Make in India - Domestic Defense Manufacturing

WolfPack86

Senior Member
Joined
Oct 20, 2015
Messages
8,069
Likes
11,032
Country flag
‘101 weapons identified for indigenisation under Atmanirbhar Bharat Abhiyan’
In the backdrop of stiff opposition by employees of defence production units to the Centre’s move for corporatisation of ordnance factories, the Defence Ministry has unveiled a list of 101 weapons/platforms for indigenisation with specific timelines.


To a question raised by Rajya Sabha MP N. Siva in Parliament on Monday seeking information on the Defence Ministry’s decision to restrict import under the ‘Atmanirbhar Bharat Abhiyan’, Minister of State for Defence Shripad Naik, said 101 defence weapons/platforms had been listed to provide impetus to self-reliance in defence manufacturing.


The Centre had also specified year-wise timelines with objectives of self-reliance and exports and to transform India as one of the top countries in the world in defence and aerospace sectors. There were 67 defence weapons/platforms in the list, which would be manufactured only within the country with effect from December 2020; 12 items with effect from December 2021; four with effect from December 2022; eight with effect from December 2023; eight with effect from December 2024; and two with effect from December 2025.


The Union Minister also said the import embargo entailed increased participation of Indian defence industries, both public and private sectors, in response to Mr. Siva’s query on whether the 101 items would be manufactured by defence ordnance factories or by other private manufacturers.


Ordnance factories have been promised that they will have a substantial stake in the defence industrial corridor projects in Tamil Nadu and Uttar Pradesh. The information provided in Parliament also provides clarity to prospective private investors in the proposed Tamil Nadu Defence Industrial Corridor Project under ‘Atmanirbhar Bharat Abhiyan’ (self-reliant India).


On their part, private industries already involved in production of components for defence weapons are looking for early fructification of the defence corridor project. The general opinion among the industry sector here is that Uttar Pradesh has taken a lead in giving an impetus to the defence industrial corridor project.


Meanwhile, representatives of All India Defence Employees Federation and Indian National Defence Workers Federation Bharatiya Pratiraksha Mazdoor Sangh had discussions with the officiating Chief Labour Commissioner, Ordnance Factory Board, and representatives of Ministry of Defence on Tuesday to discuss the federations’ indefinite strike opposing corporatisation planned from October 12.
 

avknight1408

Regular Member
Joined
Apr 16, 2015
Messages
717
Likes
2,215
Country flag
Govt permits 74% FDI in defence under automatic route - Economic Times


I have bad feeling about this decision. This will allow foreign companies unrestricted entry to defence sector. May become the death knell for many indigenous projects.

Already in the carbine tender PLR systems is participating claiming 'Atmanirbhar Bharat' when in fact their products are Israeli origin. That's not the indigenous MIC we hope to have.
It's a shame that India is importing basic weapons from small countries like Israel , Belgium & Czech republic.:frusty:
 

Assassin 2.0

Senior Member
Joined
Aug 13, 2019
Messages
5,377
Likes
26,869
Country flag
Already in the carbine tender PLR systems is participating claiming 'Atmanirbhar Bharat' when in fact their products are Israeli origin. That's not the indigenous MIC we hope to have.
PLR Systems is making those rifles in india with Indian raw materials and is providing local support and maintenance.
PLR Systems is in collaboration with isreali industry and are working to produce top of the line products in india and i don't find anything wrong in that we have advanced defence relationship with Isreal so why not use there technical knowledge to boost our defence forces.

Its always better to buy indian made assault rifles compared to importing from UAE.

I don't know why people think that denying indian private sector from working with foreign oems . I think india should push forward to gain every chance to have locally manufactured products and infrastructure.
 

Haldilal

लड़ते लड़ते जीना है, लड़ते लड़ते मरना है
Senior Member
Joined
Aug 10, 2020
Messages
2,871
Likes
8,640
Country flag
Ya'll Nibbiars If the GOI is serious on giving boost to indigenous industry in Def sector,support to local firms have to be given by giving them business and opportunity. Organisations can’t keep buying items on negative import list in urgent mode before ban kicks in.

Major MMJSM.
 

AZTEC

Regular Member
Joined
Aug 8, 2020
Messages
170
Likes
851
Country flag
New Defence Acquisition Procedure makes strong Atmanirbhar pitch |India Today Insight
The defence ministry’s rebranded Defence Acquisition Policy focuses heavily on self-reliance by discouraging off-the-shelf imports, ending offsets in government to government deals and increasing indigenous content in imported hardware

Defence Minister Rajnath Singh, Air Force Chief Air Chief Marshal RKS Bhadauria, Chief of Defence Staff General Bipin Rawat, Chief of the Naval Staff Admiral Karambir Singh and Chief of the Indian Army MM Naravane during the unveiling of the new Defence Acquisition Procedure (DAP)-2020 Document in New Delhi. (ANI)

Defence minister Rajnath Singh today released the government’s Defence Acquisition Procedure (DAP)-2020, a renamed version of the Defence Procurement Policy (DPP). The DAP-2020 lays down guidelines for the ministry of defence (MoD) to acquire weapons and equipment.

The DAP-2020, which has been in the works for a year, is significantly focused on indigenisation and realising the government’s ‘Atmanirbhar Bharat (self-reliant India)’ goal. Among the highlights are the notification of a list of weapons and platforms banned from imports, the indigenisation of imported spares, and exploring the willingness of prospective foreign vendors to progressively undertake manufacturing as well as setting up of indigenous ecosystems even at the spares and sub-component levels.

The DAP which comes into effect on October 1, 2020 ends defence offsets in three categories- Government to Government deals, Inter-Governmental Agreements and resultant single vendor deals (where only one manufacturer is found to be compliant with all the requirements of the armed forces). The defence offsets policy mandates a foreign original equipment maker must invest between 30 and 50 per cent of the value of a contract in sourcing parts and components from Indian industry

As part of its plan to leverage India’s position as the world’s second-largest arms importer and kick-start an indigenous defence ecosystem, the DAP has introduced a new category of ‘Buy (Global-Manufacture in India)’. ‘Buy (Global)’ is a category where the entire platform is imported from a foreign supplier with no production in India. ‘Buy (Global-Manufacture in India)’ calls for ‘manufacturing either the entire or a part of the equipment or spares and assemblies and sub-assemblies, maintenance, repair and overhaul for the equipment through its subsidiary in India’.

The MoD reasons this is being done to encourage foreign OEMs (original equipment manufacturers) to set up ‘manufacturing/maintenance entities’ through their subsidiaries in India while enabling requisite protections to the domestic industry.

What the DAP does, or at least intends to do, is to effectively end off-the-shelf purchases, which do not have any indigenous content (IC). ‘Buy (Global)’ has traditionally been at the bottom of MoD’s desirability chart (see table enclosed), topped by Indigenously Designed Developed and Manufactured (IDDM) products. This is because off-the-shelf products involve a huge foreign exchange outgo and no technology benefits to Indian firms apart from lifelong dependence on the supplier for spares and servicing. These acquisitions, however, go through because often no competing systems are available. A case in point being the five S-400 missile systems worth $5.43 billion (Rs 40,058 crore) that India bought off the shelf from Russia and the 10 C-17 GlobemasterIII heavy lift aircraft purchased from the US for over $4 billion (Rs 29,509 crore).

In the revised ‘Buy (Global)’ category, the DAP stipulates that the OEM will need to put in Indian content to the tune of 30 per cent of the contract value. For ‘Buy (Global-Manufacture in India)’, the OEM will need to ensure that 50 per cent of the value of the contract is sourced from Indian firms. It remains to be seen how this policy will be implemented and how effective is the ‘simple and practical indigenous content verification process’ that the MoD claims to have put in place.

The way forward, according to defence ministry officials, is for foreign OEMs to set up subsidiaries in India taking advantage of the government policy announced in May this year which allows 74 per cent FDI in defence manufacturing (it was 49 per cent earlier). Foreign OEMs with a majority stake will be considered as Indian firms, eligible to participate in ‘Buy Indian’ and ‘Buy and Make Indian’ contests that were previously open only for Indian companies.

India plans to spend $130 billion (Rs 9.59 lakh crore) on military modernisation over the next five years. The government has opened up the defence industry for private sector participation to provide an impetus to indigenous manufacturing.

The DPP has been revised in 2005, 2006, 2008, 2009, 2011 and 2013, adding new categories like ‘Make’, ‘Buy and Make’ and ‘Make (Indian)’ as well as the concept of offsets and ship-building procedures since governments, over the years, have pursued ways to reduce India’s crippling dependence on imported military hardware.
 

Bhumihar

Cheeni KLPDhokebaaz
Senior Member
Joined
Jun 5, 2017
Messages
6,848
Likes
23,606
Country flag
New Defence Acquisition Procedure makes strong Atmanirbhar pitch |India Today Insight
The defence ministry’s rebranded Defence Acquisition Policy focuses heavily on self-reliance by discouraging off-the-shelf imports, ending offsets in government to government deals and increasing indigenous content in imported hardware

Defence Minister Rajnath Singh, Air Force Chief Air Chief Marshal RKS Bhadauria, Chief of Defence Staff General Bipin Rawat, Chief of the Naval Staff Admiral Karambir Singh and Chief of the Indian Army MM Naravane during the unveiling of the new Defence Acquisition Procedure (DAP)-2020 Document in New Delhi. (ANI)

Defence minister Rajnath Singh today released the government’s Defence Acquisition Procedure (DAP)-2020, a renamed version of the Defence Procurement Policy (DPP). The DAP-2020 lays down guidelines for the ministry of defence (MoD) to acquire weapons and equipment.

The DAP-2020, which has been in the works for a year, is significantly focused on indigenisation and realising the government’s ‘Atmanirbhar Bharat (self-reliant India)’ goal. Among the highlights are the notification of a list of weapons and platforms banned from imports, the indigenisation of imported spares, and exploring the willingness of prospective foreign vendors to progressively undertake manufacturing as well as setting up of indigenous ecosystems even at the spares and sub-component levels.

The DAP which comes into effect on October 1, 2020 ends defence offsets in three categories- Government to Government deals, Inter-Governmental Agreements and resultant single vendor deals (where only one manufacturer is found to be compliant with all the requirements of the armed forces). The defence offsets policy mandates a foreign original equipment maker must invest between 30 and 50 per cent of the value of a contract in sourcing parts and components from Indian industry

As part of its plan to leverage India’s position as the world’s second-largest arms importer and kick-start an indigenous defence ecosystem, the DAP has introduced a new category of ‘Buy (Global-Manufacture in India)’. ‘Buy (Global)’ is a category where the entire platform is imported from a foreign supplier with no production in India. ‘Buy (Global-Manufacture in India)’ calls for ‘manufacturing either the entire or a part of the equipment or spares and assemblies and sub-assemblies, maintenance, repair and overhaul for the equipment through its subsidiary in India’.

The MoD reasons this is being done to encourage foreign OEMs (original equipment manufacturers) to set up ‘manufacturing/maintenance entities’ through their subsidiaries in India while enabling requisite protections to the domestic industry.

What the DAP does, or at least intends to do, is to effectively end off-the-shelf purchases, which do not have any indigenous content (IC). ‘Buy (Global)’ has traditionally been at the bottom of MoD’s desirability chart (see table enclosed), topped by Indigenously Designed Developed and Manufactured (IDDM) products. This is because off-the-shelf products involve a huge foreign exchange outgo and no technology benefits to Indian firms apart from lifelong dependence on the supplier for spares and servicing. These acquisitions, however, go through because often no competing systems are available. A case in point being the five S-400 missile systems worth $5.43 billion (Rs 40,058 crore) that India bought off the shelf from Russia and the 10 C-17 GlobemasterIII heavy lift aircraft purchased from the US for over $4 billion (Rs 29,509 crore).

In the revised ‘Buy (Global)’ category, the DAP stipulates that the OEM will need to put in Indian content to the tune of 30 per cent of the contract value. For ‘Buy (Global-Manufacture in India)’, the OEM will need to ensure that 50 per cent of the value of the contract is sourced from Indian firms. It remains to be seen how this policy will be implemented and how effective is the ‘simple and practical indigenous content verification process’ that the MoD claims to have put in place.

The way forward, according to defence ministry officials, is for foreign OEMs to set up subsidiaries in India taking advantage of the government policy announced in May this year which allows 74 per cent FDI in defence manufacturing (it was 49 per cent earlier). Foreign OEMs with a majority stake will be considered as Indian firms, eligible to participate in ‘Buy Indian’ and ‘Buy and Make Indian’ contests that were previously open only for Indian companies.

India plans to spend $130 billion (Rs 9.59 lakh crore) on military modernisation over the next five years. The government has opened up the defence industry for private sector participation to provide an impetus to indigenous manufacturing.

The DPP has been revised in 2005, 2006, 2008, 2009, 2011 and 2013, adding new categories like ‘Make’, ‘Buy and Make’ and ‘Make (Indian)’ as well as the concept of offsets and ship-building procedures since governments, over the years, have pursued ways to reduce India’s crippling dependence on imported military hardware.
Cronies brainstorming their minds to find loopholes.


 

avknight1408

Regular Member
Joined
Apr 16, 2015
Messages
717
Likes
2,215
Country flag
OFB kicked out. Solar industries to make new grenades for army.
:balleballe:


Economic times - In a first for private sector, Defence Ministry places order for 10 lakh hand grenades


My post in Pinaka thread about solar industries.

Solar industries plant near nagpur spread across 2000 acres. Looks massive.
Screenshot_20201001-170842.jpg
 

Bhumihar

Cheeni KLPDhokebaaz
Senior Member
Joined
Jun 5, 2017
Messages
6,848
Likes
23,606
Country flag
OFB kicked out. Solar industries to make new grenades for army.
:balleballe:


Economic times - In a first for private sector, Defence Ministry places order for 10 lakh hand grenades


My post in Pinaka thread about solar industries.

Solar industries plant near nagpur spread across 2000 acres. Looks massive.
View attachment 61148
aw hell yeah a pvt company hope they do us proud.
 

ezsasa

Mod
Joined
Jul 12, 2014
Messages
15,621
Likes
48,930
Country flag

Latest Replies

Global Defence

New threads

Articles

Top