Future Infantry Combat Vehicle (FICV)

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I think l&t will win ficv order. It is already building k9 thunder and has that factory ready. It could start building ficv there fast.

But given the large numbers required .two venders might be selected just like atags.
This is just a glimpse of what our Pvt defence sector can do.maybe they are having technical inputs or JV with someone but they have to start from somewhere.when I said look at the side armour what I meant was,that the armour can be scaled up or down according to the needs.it can also use rubber tracks if it wants to reduce weight further just like GD's ASCOD or BAE's CV 90(one platform multiple variants) though they don't have amphibious variant.have to watch out for TATA and M&M also.heard KALYANI is also in fray.
 

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Frankly, I don't really know... By what I deduced from the description, possibly a frame with composite armour modules.
Bro,what they meant could be complete composite monocoque shell,that is not like body on frame type.apart from weight reduction,the use of composite will also help in aiding the amphibious characteristic of the ICV.DRDO has successfully managed to mould composite in single large piece for roof of the hull.usually small pieces are joined together for large sections.benefits are better strength, durability & rigidity and also very few countries have the technology and to mould composite in single large piece.this could also help in our naval (MCMV) and various other projects also.
 

WolfPack86

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‘Technology will be a key driver of future wars, Indian Army is on track’: Army Chief Naravane – Exclusive Q&A ahead of DefExpo 2020

Future wars are going to be not only network-centric but also complex. And, the Indian Army is prepared for it. It has a long -term perspective plan which is based on the analysis of likely threats and with the changing threats the perspective plan changes accordingly. According to the Army Chief Gen M M Naravane, “For the Indian Army whether it recruitment or acquisition of the defence equipment — Quality and not the quantity is the mantra.” On the eve of the 11th edition of Defence Expo 2020 in Lucknow, Gen Naravane in an interaction with Huma Siddiqui says that the modernisation of the Indian Army is on track.

What is the progress of modernisation in Indian Army? And the current statuses of projects like the Future Infantry Combat Vehicles (FICV), Future Ready Combat Vehicle (FRCV), Close Quarter Battle (CQB) Carbines, and Rifles to be made in India.


Rifles:
A case for procurement of 6,71,427 Assault Rifles for Indian Army is being progressed on an Inter-Government Agreement (IGA), wherein a Joint Venture, Indo Russia Rifles Private Ltd (IRRPL) has been formed between OFB & Kalashnikov. RFP for this case has been issued & is being progressed as per laid down procedures.

CQB Carbine: Scheme for CQB Carbine for immediate requirement of 93,895 carbines under Fast Track Procurement is at an advanced stage. For balance requirement, the case is in progress separately.

FRCV: The Request for Information was uploaded in November 2017 with the date of submission as June 30, 2018. We have received responses of four OEMs for the complete platforms. The process for ratification of Qualitative requirements for the FRCV is currently under progress. The FRCV project is progressing as per the guidelines of the Strategic Partnership Model.

FICV: Interactions are presently taking place to progress the case expeditiously. Various options are being considered. A fresh RFI for Project FICV has been prepared and will be shared with the industry in some time. Keeping with the pace of phasing out of existing platforms, and efforts are on to achieve its induction by 2026-27.

How is the Army getting ready for future warfare?
Future conflicts are likely to be more violent and unpredictable and battle spaces severely contested, seamlessly connected, and constrained by indeterminable factors. Technology will become the key driver of future wars. The spectrum of conflict having broadened has brought almost all the organs of the state within the ambit of conflict. The response, therefore, will have to be planned and integrated at the apex level.

Cyberspace is likely to be fiercely contested in future with threats of Cyber-attacks to critical national infrastructure. Non-kinetic, non-contact means are likely to see more engagements. Battle of narratives, climate change leading to mass migrations and competition for natural resources, ideologically driven radicalised ‘Proxies’ are likely to enhance the operating space. The Armed Forces would need to be conscious about the dynamic and rapid technological advancements in space, its militarisation and increasing integration of space capabilities with future warfighting.

There is a need to protect the country’s security interests which will increase and hence geo-strategic imperatives dictate possession of commensurate capabilities.

How well is the Army prepared?
We are closely monitoring the security situation, assessing manifestations of future threats & analysing the changing character of conflict, updating our doctrines and response options in the process. We have a well-established system of capability building through Long Term Perspective Plans which is being pursued vigorously within the given budgetary envelope. Numerous measures in terms of procurement through emergency powers, Fast Track Procurement, Inter-Governmental Agreements and Foreign Military Sales are being optimally exploited to bridge capability gaps.

Nature of future military and non-military security, therefore, implies the imperative need for the Army to be prepared for multi-spectrum challenges. It needs to remain prepared and trained to fight a conventional war, while continuing to deploy large numbers to guard our multi-front borders, countering proxy war and fighting insurgencies, and also provide troops to UN and out of the area contingency (OOAC) missions, all at the same time.

What are the Army’s expectations from Defence Expo 2020?
The DefExpo is one of the largest gathering of defence professionals globally (35 international delegations). It showcases the Indian Defence Ecosystem as an emerging hub to meet the defence needs of the region and the globe and allow DPSUs/ Indian Pvt Industry/ MSMEs/ Start-Ups/ Garage Innovators to showcase their expertise/ Products to Armed Forces of the region / World.

The army expects substantial contribution from the private sector, foreign and domestic, in exploiting emerging technologies to enable long term and holistic solutions to the country’s security needs to include — Resource Generation; Boost Defence Exports, ‘Make in India’ in the Defence sector.

Most importantly, it will give a fillip to defence minister Rajnath Singh’s desire to build a defence manufacturing hub of US $ 26 billion 2025.

The expo also provides a platform for users/ Field Commanders to interact/ familiarize with emerging technologies (non-contact and disruptive) so as to enable the Indian Army to fight future wars.

It will also strengthen defence and manufacturing partnerships (bi-lateral and multilateral).
 

Bajirao

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‘Technology will be a key driver of future wars, Indian Army is on track’: Army Chief Naravane – Exclusive Q&A ahead of DefExpo 2020

Future wars are going to be not only network-centric but also complex. And, the Indian Army is prepared for it. It has a long -term perspective plan which is based on the analysis of likely threats and with the changing threats the perspective plan changes accordingly. According to the Army Chief Gen M M Naravane, “For the Indian Army whether it recruitment or acquisition of the defence equipment — Quality and not the quantity is the mantra.” On the eve of the 11th edition of Defence Expo 2020 in Lucknow, Gen Naravane in an interaction with Huma Siddiqui says that the modernisation of the Indian Army is on track.

What is the progress of modernisation in Indian Army? And the current statuses of projects like the Future Infantry Combat Vehicles (FICV), Future Ready Combat Vehicle (FRCV), Close Quarter Battle (CQB) Carbines, and Rifles to be made in India.


Rifles:
A case for procurement of 6,71,427 Assault Rifles for Indian Army is being progressed on an Inter-Government Agreement (IGA), wherein a Joint Venture, Indo Russia Rifles Private Ltd (IRRPL) has been formed between OFB & Kalashnikov. RFP for this case has been issued & is being progressed as per laid down procedures.

CQB Carbine: Scheme for CQB Carbine for immediate requirement of 93,895 carbines under Fast Track Procurement is at an advanced stage. For balance requirement, the case is in progress separately.

FRCV: The Request for Information was uploaded in November 2017 with the date of submission as June 30, 2018. We have received responses of four OEMs for the complete platforms. The process for ratification of Qualitative requirements for the FRCV is currently under progress. The FRCV project is progressing as per the guidelines of the Strategic Partnership Model.

FICV: Interactions are presently taking place to progress the case expeditiously. Various options are being considered. A fresh RFI for Project FICV has been prepared and will be shared with the industry in some time. Keeping with the pace of phasing out of existing platforms, and efforts are on to achieve its induction by 2026-27.

How is the Army getting ready for future warfare?
Future conflicts are likely to be more violent and unpredictable and battle spaces severely contested, seamlessly connected, and constrained by indeterminable factors. Technology will become the key driver of future wars. The spectrum of conflict having broadened has brought almost all the organs of the state within the ambit of conflict. The response, therefore, will have to be planned and integrated at the apex level.

Cyberspace is likely to be fiercely contested in future with threats of Cyber-attacks to critical national infrastructure. Non-kinetic, non-contact means are likely to see more engagements. Battle of narratives, climate change leading to mass migrations and competition for natural resources, ideologically driven radicalised ‘Proxies’ are likely to enhance the operating space. The Armed Forces would need to be conscious about the dynamic and rapid technological advancements in space, its militarisation and increasing integration of space capabilities with future warfighting.

There is a need to protect the country’s security interests which will increase and hence geo-strategic imperatives dictate possession of commensurate capabilities.

How well is the Army prepared?
We are closely monitoring the security situation, assessing manifestations of future threats & analysing the changing character of conflict, updating our doctrines and response options in the process. We have a well-established system of capability building through Long Term Perspective Plans which is being pursued vigorously within the given budgetary envelope. Numerous measures in terms of procurement through emergency powers, Fast Track Procurement, Inter-Governmental Agreements and Foreign Military Sales are being optimally exploited to bridge capability gaps.

Nature of future military and non-military security, therefore, implies the imperative need for the Army to be prepared for multi-spectrum challenges. It needs to remain prepared and trained to fight a conventional war, while continuing to deploy large numbers to guard our multi-front borders, countering proxy war and fighting insurgencies, and also provide troops to UN and out of the area contingency (OOAC) missions, all at the same time.

What are the Army’s expectations from Defence Expo 2020?
The DefExpo is one of the largest gathering of defence professionals globally (35 international delegations). It showcases the Indian Defence Ecosystem as an emerging hub to meet the defence needs of the region and the globe and allow DPSUs/ Indian Pvt Industry/ MSMEs/ Start-Ups/ Garage Innovators to showcase their expertise/ Products to Armed Forces of the region / World.

The army expects substantial contribution from the private sector, foreign and domestic, in exploiting emerging technologies to enable long term and holistic solutions to the country’s security needs to include — Resource Generation; Boost Defence Exports, ‘Make in India’ in the Defence sector.

Most importantly, it will give a fillip to defence minister Rajnath Singh’s desire to build a defence manufacturing hub of US $ 26 billion 2025.

The expo also provides a platform for users/ Field Commanders to interact/ familiarize with emerging technologies (non-contact and disruptive) so as to enable the Indian Army to fight future wars.

It will also strengthen defence and manufacturing partnerships (bi-lateral and multilateral).
Reality: t-90,bmp-2......wet dream:frcv,ficv......except 6 diesel submarine not a sigle strategic partnership project will succeed..these two projects should be executed like atags but negligence towards indian design still very strong in army.air force and navy are no exception......i think modi unintentionally gifted a big excuse to army generels for importing foreign arms in the name of 'make in india'..otherwise when our spg operating drdo designed jvpc,why we still importing carbine for army.army converted 'make in india' into 'paint in india'...
 

IndianHawk

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Reality: t-90,bmp-2......wet dream:frcv,ficv......except 6 diesel submarine not a sigle strategic partnership project will succeed..these two projects should be executed like atags but negligence towards indian design still very strong in army.air force and navy are no exception......i think modi unintentionally gifted a big excuse to army generels for importing foreign arms in the name of 'make in india'..otherwise when our spg operating drdo designed jvpc,why we still importing carbine for army.army converted 'make in india' into 'paint in india'...
The thing is that ficv frcv involve Tata , l&t and Mahindra now.

These guys carry weight in bureaucracy as well as political class. They will fight tooth and nail for orders and they will influence any one that needs to be influenced.

So I have hope that Indian private sector could wrestle these contracts either by hook or crook.
 

Mikesingh

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Army to get 156 BMP-2/2k for over Rs 1000 cr

PIB, June 2


In a major boost to ‘Make in India’ initiative of the Government, Acquisition Wing of Ministry of Defence (MoD) with the approval of Raksha Mantri Shri Rajnath Singh, has today placed an Indent on Ordnance Factory Board (OFB) for supply of 156 BMP 2/2k Infantry Combat Vehicles (ICV) with upgraded features for use of the Mechanised Forces of the Indian Army. Under this Indent, the ICVs will be manufactured by Ordnance Factory, Medak in Telangana at an approximate cost of Rs 1,094 crore.

The BMP-2/2K ICVs are going to be powered by 285 horse power engines and are lower in weight which will make them highly mobile to meet all tactical requirements of mobility in the battlefield. These ICVs will be able to reach a speed of 65 kilometres per hour (kmph) with easy steering ability in cross country terrain. They will have amphibious capabilities to travel at 07 kmph in water. These are designed to overcome slope of upto 35° cross obstacles of 0.7 metre and have lethal firepower capability.

With the induction of these 156 BMP 2/2K ICVs, planned to be completed by 2023, the existing deficiency in the Mechanised Infantry Battalions will be mitigated and the combat capability of the Army will be further enhanced.


Stopgap acquisition?
 

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