Light tanks for Indian Army

Marliii

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The base design requirements in RFI points to the fact that Army is confortable of the proposal of a light tank based on IFV whose basic design should not weight beyond 18-20 tons. On that a turret with a 105 mm gun can be mounted.

In the indegeneous front, both OFBs BMP 2 and TATA's proposed FICV version matches this requirement.

Anything other than that russian sprut
 

Neeraj Mathur

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Anyone with any info on K30 Biho system from South korea. where are we on the system and order?
 

HariPrasad-1

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At the time of Ladakh standoff, I had repeatedly said that the specialised weapon hold the key
of winning the conflict. This light tank is a specialised weapon which India is trying to develop to deploy in the Himalayan region. Salvo firing capable Prahaar missile will counter the the Chinese so called 300 kilometre range artillery. The higly specific weapon for the the Himalayan region will be pralay missile which will hit the the targets on other side of the mountain with 800 kg of payload with 10 m CEP. We need it fast.
 

sorcerer

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Hanwha Defense ready to offer new light tank to Indian Army


South Korea’s Hanwha Defense is pushing a new combat vehicle with a 105mm turret mounted on its K21 chassis for the Indian Army.


Just last week, the Indian Army released Request for Information (RFI) to seek prospective vendors to procure around 350 light tanks in a phased manner under the Make in India initiative.

Indian Army plans to procure versatile combat platforms, weighing less than 25 tonnes, to sharpen its edge in mountain warfare as they will be able to exploit the limited space available in mountainous terrains by way of enhanced mobility, thus providing additional firepower.

Hanwha Defense says the vehicle has a 105mm turret mounted on a K21 infantry fighting vehicle chassis. It has strong firepower and maneuverability that enables the vehicle to perform a wider variety of tactical operations than main battle tanks.

The company also shared a promo video of its K21-105 tank, which they are classified as a medium tank.


 

WolfPack86

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INDIAN ARMY WOULD LIKE TO ACQUIRE 350 LIGHT TANKS WEIGHING LESS THAN 25 TONS
The Indian army has issued a new RFI (Request For Information) to acquire 350 light tanks weighing less than 25 tons. This request comes after the clash with the Chinese army near the disputed Pangong Lake in Ladakh and the Tibet Autonomous Region, and near the border between Sikkim and the Tibet Autonomous Region.

According to the Request For Information (RFI), the Indian army would like to have a light tank featuring a multiple, modular and upgradable weapon system with the capability to destroy and offer countermeasures to varied threats.

The new light tank should also feature multiple weapons for anti-aircraft and ground role with different calibre assisted with remote control weapon station. For ammunition, the tank should employ modern advance multipurpose ‘smart munitions’ with a gun able to fire anti-tank guided missiles. The tank should have an auxiliary power unit, preheated, environment control unit and anti-drone capability, UAV jammers, net-enabled.

Currently, the Indian army operates Russian-made main battle tank T-90S called Bhishma and T-72M1 nicknamed Ajeya. Modern heavy tanks are not designed to be deployed in mountainous regions with narrow roads and crossing points not able to support a combat vehicle with a weight of 50 tons.

China has developed the Type 15 a lightweight tank that has a maximum weight of 36 tons and offers the mobility and the firepower of a standard Main Battle Tank (MBT). In fact, the Type 15 also called VT5 is armed with one 105 mm rifled gun with a thermal sleeve and fume extractor which has a maximum firing range of 3,000 m. The gun is able to fire anti-tank missiles fitted with a tandem HEAT (High Explosive Anti-Tank) warhead able to destroy armoured or tanks protected with reactive armour (ERA). The missile has a maximum firing range of 5,000 m.

Currently, three companies have developed the concept of light tanks using tracked chassis including BAE Systems, General Dynamics, and Elbit Systems. U.S. Army has launched the MPF (Mobile Protected Firepower) program to have a new light tank for the airborne troops. Two prototypes of light tanks have already delivered to the US military for testing.

General Dynamics has developed a new light tank that weighs less than 30 tons. The light tank can be armed with a 120 or a 105 mm cannon and will have armour similar to a standard MBT. In October 2015 during the AUSA defence exhibition in Washington D.C., BAE Systems has unveiled a new concept of a light tank called Expeditionary Light Tank that could be airdropped from a C-130 aircraft. The company’s solution was based on the purpose-built M8 Armoured Gun System, modernized with mature technologies from the CV90 family of infantry fighting vehicles and the Bradley Fighting Vehicle.

Recently, the Philippines has awarded the contract for the Philippine Army's Light Tank and Wheeled Armoured Personnel Carrier Acquisition Projects to the Israeli company Elbit Systems. The new light tank for the Philippines is the Sabra which is based on the ASCOD-2 tracked chassis.

In Europe, the Turkish company FNSS has designed the Kaplan fitted with a two-man turret armed with a standard NATO 105mm rifled gun which can fire both AP (Armor Piercing) and HE (High Explosive) ammunitions. The South Korean company Hanwha has also developed a light tank concept of light based on the K-21 IFV (Infantry Fighting Vehicle) fitted with a two-man turret CT-CV 105HP designed by the Belgian company John Cockerill.
 

HariPrasad-1

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INDIAN ARMY WOULD LIKE TO ACQUIRE 350 LIGHT TANKS WEIGHING LESS THAN 25 TONS
The Indian army has issued a new RFI (Request For Information) to acquire 350 light tanks weighing less than 25 tons. This request comes after the clash with the Chinese army near the disputed Pangong Lake in Ladakh and the Tibet Autonomous Region, and near the border between Sikkim and the Tibet Autonomous Region.

According to the Request For Information (RFI), the Indian army would like to have a light tank featuring a multiple, modular and upgradable weapon system with the capability to destroy and offer countermeasures to varied threats.

The new light tank should also feature multiple weapons for anti-aircraft and ground role with different calibre assisted with remote control weapon station. For ammunition, the tank should employ modern advance multipurpose ‘smart munitions’ with a gun able to fire anti-tank guided missiles. The tank should have an auxiliary power unit, preheated, environment control unit and anti-drone capability, UAV jammers, net-enabled.

Currently, the Indian army operates Russian-made main battle tank T-90S called Bhishma and T-72M1 nicknamed Ajeya. Modern heavy tanks are not designed to be deployed in mountainous regions with narrow roads and crossing points not able to support a combat vehicle with a weight of 50 tons.

China has developed the Type 15 a lightweight tank that has a maximum weight of 36 tons and offers the mobility and the firepower of a standard Main Battle Tank (MBT). In fact, the Type 15 also called VT5 is armed with one 105 mm rifled gun with a thermal sleeve and fume extractor which has a maximum firing range of 3,000 m. The gun is able to fire anti-tank missiles fitted with a tandem HEAT (High Explosive Anti-Tank) warhead able to destroy armoured or tanks protected with reactive armour (ERA). The missile has a maximum firing range of 5,000 m.

Currently, three companies have developed the concept of light tanks using tracked chassis including BAE Systems, General Dynamics, and Elbit Systems. U.S. Army has launched the MPF (Mobile Protected Firepower) program to have a new light tank for the airborne troops. Two prototypes of light tanks have already delivered to the US military for testing.

General Dynamics has developed a new light tank that weighs less than 30 tons. The light tank can be armed with a 120 or a 105 mm cannon and will have armour similar to a standard MBT. In October 2015 during the AUSA defence exhibition in Washington D.C., BAE Systems has unveiled a new concept of a light tank called Expeditionary Light Tank that could be airdropped from a C-130 aircraft. The company’s solution was based on the purpose-built M8 Armoured Gun System, modernized with mature technologies from the CV90 family of infantry fighting vehicles and the Bradley Fighting Vehicle.

Recently, the Philippines has awarded the contract for the Philippine Army's Light Tank and Wheeled Armoured Personnel Carrier Acquisition Projects to the Israeli company Elbit Systems. The new light tank for the Philippines is the Sabra which is based on the ASCOD-2 tracked chassis.

In Europe, the Turkish company FNSS has designed the Kaplan fitted with a two-man turret armed with a standard NATO 105mm rifled gun which can fire both AP (Armor Piercing) and HE (High Explosive) ammunitions. The South Korean company Hanwha has also developed a light tank concept of light based on the K-21 IFV (Infantry Fighting Vehicle) fitted with a two-man turret CT-CV 105HP designed by the Belgian company John Cockerill.
They should make Design and give a contract to some one like Kalyani or L & T who can deliver this very fast like L & T did in the case of K9 Vajra.
 

airstrike99

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1620539914821.png


summary:

indian mechanised forces procurement be like:

step 1 ) make GSRQ in 1976

step 2) approve the project by DRDO after 7 years in 1983 ( "IF Its nOT accORdINg tO oUr 1976 GsRQ reqUIRemeNTs, thEN itS cancELLED ")

step 3) give 3 years to complete. i.e by 1986

step 4) tell that " liGHt TAnkS nOt reQuirED " in 2 years. i.e by 1985. but don't cancel the project(along with the requirements)

step 5) change requirements once in every 3 years (for example 90mm gun to 105 mm gun). even though you already told that its not required and you are not going to buy.

step 6) once again tell that you don't need light tanks, but continue the project anyway.

step 7) scientific advisor to defence minister cringes so hard and tells to shut it down in 1994

step 8) " ITs alREADy 1996, why is tHE LIghT taNK nOT aCCORdinG to THE laTEST InterNATional STANDards "

step 9) cancel the project

step 10) issue a new RFI in 2021 for light tanks even though you know that you would reject any indigenous light tank, just to acquire the russian sprut 2S25SD along with some ( $:lehappy:"coRRUpTIOn ..? wHAT does THAT meAN")


will-1.jpg
 

WolfPack86

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India sets eyes on Russian Sprut light tanks to counter China, gets rare access to trials
New Delhi:
India has set its eyes on procuring the Russian-made Sprut-SDM1 light tanks, to counter China in the mountainous terrain along the Line of Actual Control (LAC), and will also take part in the trials of the system starting late summer.

This will be a first for Russia because no other country has witnessed trials of a product that is under development.


According to sources in the security and defence establishment, India is keen on the 18-tonne Sprut because it shares the gun of the T-90 tank and fires the same kind of ammunition. India is currently operating T-90 and T-72 tanks, which are also Russian-origin, besides Arjun.

This will mean logistics and maintenance systems of the Sprut tanks will not have to be drastically different for the Armoured Corps.

While it is largely believed that the Russian forces have already inducted Sprut, sources said the tanks are still undergoing trials and are in the last stages of development.




Russia’s approval to include India in the trials of the light tanks — which can be airlifted, parachuted with crew inside and can even disembark from a ship — came after Defence Minister Rajnath Singh spoke about India’s need for light tanks during his visit to Russia in August 2020.

As reported by ThePrint then, Russia had offered India the light Sprut SDM1 tanks during Singh’s visit. The move came as India had deployed the T-90 tanks, weighing about 46 tonnes, in Ladakh during the prolonged standoff with China.

This was besides the T-72 tanks, which weigh around 45 tonnes, deployed earlier. Conversely, China had deployed its new lightweight tanks, Type 15, besides other armoured elements.


After India’s request, sources familiar with the matter said, discussions were held at various levels within the Russian establishment and a final go-ahead for inclusion in trials was given by the “very top”.

Accordingly, a team of the Indian Army will visit Russia later this year, and witness the firing and mobility trials of the tank.


Meanwhile, India has also floated a Request for Information (RFI) for 350 light tanks, which should not weigh more than 25 tonnes. This weight criteria will rule out many of the light tanks currently available in the market.

Capabilities of Sprut-SDM1
Sprut-SDM1 is the only light amphibious fighting vehicle in the world that possesses the
firepower of a main battle tank, a 125mm main gun. The other unique future is the ability to fire a cannon afloat, sources said.

Other similar products are Chinese Type 15 light tank and the Turkish Kaplan MT medium tank. However, both these tanks have 105mm main guns unlike the Sprut’s 125mm main gun.

Furthermore, only the Sprut-SDM1 can fire guided missiles and has a potent armament suite that includes a 125mm gun, a 7.62mm remote-controlled machine gun and a 7.62mm coaxial machine gun.

The tank’s onboard guided missile weapon system can engage armoured targets, including explosive reactive armour (ERA)-equipped ones at ranges up to 5km, besides being able to engage low-flying helicopters by the roof-mounted machine-gun mount.

“The Sprut is a genuine light tank in terms of weight. The Chinese and Turkish tanks are heavier. Sprut should give greater mobility and combat edge over its rivals. The trials would show whether it lives up to the promise or not,” a source told ThePrint.

The Sprut can also travel over a distance of 500 km without refuelling and can be transported by military transport aircraft and landing ships besides being parachuted with a crew inside the vehicle.

Competition from the ‘desi’ light tank
While India has set its eyes on the Russian Sprut, the Defence Research and Development Organisation (DRDO) and Larson & Toubro are in talks with each other to possibly convert another tank — the K9 Vajra 155mm/52 calibre Tracked Self-Propelled Howitzer — into a light- or medium-weight tank that could be used in mountain regions like Ladakh.

DRDO and L&T are looking to reduce the tank’s weight by replacing the heavy 155mm gun with a 105mm or 120mm gun.

This will also change the tank’s turret design and the overall weight will reduce from its current 47 tonnes. More weight-reducing technology and material can also be used, which is expected to make the tank at least 10 tonnes lighter.

The aim is for the Vajra tank to actually weigh around 30 to 35 tonnes or somewhere close, which can be deployed in the mountains.

Armoured Corps first pitched for light tanks in 2009
The Armoured Directorate of the Army had first moved a proposal for light tanks in 2009. However, the Army’s top brass shot down the proposal as they felt that light tanks were not needed.

“The proposal had been kept in cold storage since then. But the Ladakh tensions showed how light tanks can play a critical role in areas where traditional main battle tanks cannot operate,” noted a source.

“Why did China deploy light tanks besides its heavier variants. This is despite the fact that China has a flatter terrain along the LAC than India, which is more mountainous. The tanks in front provide the infantry with the biggest fire power and light tanks are needed for the mountains,” he told ThePrint.

India has had light tanks in the past, which were used during the 1947-48 Kashmir operations (M 5 Stuart tank weighing about 16 tonnes) and then the 1962 and 1971 wars (PT 76 tanks weighing around 15 tonnes).

However, these paved the way for heavier tanks as the focus has been fixed on Pakistan and the plains ever since.
 

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