Kaveri Engine

M M Bhatnagar

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Kaveri jet engine finally poised for first flight

After 20 years in the making, the Kaveri jet engine will finally take to the skies.
In 1989, Dr Mohana Rao, then a junior technician at the Gas Turbine Research Establishment (GTRE), Bangalore, immersed himself in the ambitious Kaveri programme, which was designing a jet engine for the Tejas Light Combat Aircraft. After pushing the Kaveri through two decades of heartbreak and achievement, Dr Rao is now the Director of GTRE. And his baby, the Kaveri engine, is ready to fly.

This week, a fully built Kaveri engine will be transported to a testing facility outside Moscow called the Gromov Flight Research Institute. Here, a giant IL-76 aircraft will have one of its four engines replaced with a Kaveri. Russian and GTRE experts will then evaluate the Kaveri’s performance while the IL-76 flies.

Before the actual flight tests, Russian experts at Moscow’s Central Institute of Aviation Motors will run ground checks on the Kaveri’s performance, in conditions that simulate altitudes up to 15 kilometers (49,200 feet).

Business Standard visited the Kaveri ground test bed at GTRE, Bangalore, where Russian experts are finishing “pre-acceptance checks” on the Kaveri engine that is headed for their facilities in Russia. The giant turbofan engine, suspended from a ceiling bracket, was being revved up gradually. As it roared to a deafening crescendo, engineers monitored the Kaveri’s power output, watching carefully from behind a bullet-proof glass window.

“The Kaveri’s development is complete”, confirmed Dr Mohana Rao, “In ground testing at GTRE it met the performance parameters laid down in 1998. The next step is to confirm that it performs during flight. A 50-person GTRE team will travel with the engine to Moscow and participate in the flight trials over the next 3-4 months.”

India has no facilities for altitude-testing and flight-testing jet engines. GTRE estimates it will take several hundred crore rupees to create such test facilities in India. Meanwhile, each test campaign in Russia costs Rs 50-60 crores.

For the DRDO (GTRE is a DRDO laboratory) even a successful Kaveri flight will be a bittersweet end to one of India’s most savagely criticised development programmes. A measure of success, on the one hand, in an ambitious technological leapfrog to building a modern jet engine, something only a few countries can do. On the other hand, the Kaveri has failed to provide an engine for the Tejas, even after spending Rs 3000 crores.

“The reason was two-fold”, explains Mohana Rao. “The Kaveri turned out 15% heavier than we planned. From the planned 1100 kg, its final weight has gone up to 1265 kg.”

Meanwhile, the Tejas fighter also turned out heavier than planned, demanding a more powerful engine; the Kaveri’s maximum thrust of 65 Kilo Newtons (KN) is simply not enough. The air force has chosen American GE 404-IN engines, which produce 80 KN at full power, to power the first 20 Tejas fighters. And subsequent Tejas will get about 95 KN of thrust from a new-generation engine: the General Electric GE-414 and the Eurojet EJ200 engines are currently being evaluated.

But GTRE is undeterred, having produced a high-tech turbofan jet engine in a country that has never produced even a motorcycle or car engine.

“We need more thrust without increasing the size of the engine”, says Mohana Rao. “That means getting better technologies from a more experienced foreign partner. We have chosen (French aero-engine major) Snecma. The Defence Ministry has approved the tie-up.”

Business Standard has learned that Rolls Royce, and General Electric declined to partner GTRE, apparently unwilling to part with cutting-edge technology. US major, Pratt & Whitney, was willing only to provide consultancy. With only Russia’s NPO Saturn and Snecma in the game, the MoD has opted for Snecma.

source
 

Tridev123

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Is this a recent report?.
They did take the Kaveri to Russia for testing some years back but the results were not that satisfactory. The engine was found wanting in high altitude performance.

There has been no new news on the Kaveri. I have my doubts. Please confirm the date of the report.
 

VIP

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Is this a recent report?.
They did take the Kaveri to Russia for testing some years back but the results were not that satisfactory. The engine was found wanting in high altitude performance.

There has been no new news on the Kaveri. I have my doubts. Please confirm the date of the report.
No, he has just quoted the 1st post this very thread. It was posted in 2009
 

Tridev123

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No, he has just quoted the 1st post this very thread. It was posted in 2009
I thought so.
Bro, they need to seriously give more attention to the project. There has been no fresh budget allocation or even plans to revive the project. It is a very technically challenging project and probably as difficult as a nuclear weapons program. That is why so few countries are capable of mass producing good turbofan engines. The technology is highly guarded.

But our indigenous efforts are not enough at all. Money allotted is peanuts compared to the funds allocated for jet engines development in countries like China.
Materials science is a very key part in developing high performance jet engines. Other than the public sector and government institutions I see almost no research being done in aerospace technologies in the private sector. The GTRE should share whatever knowledge that they have on jet engines with private companies who are good in engineering. Like L&T or even Godrej & Boyce. Why not ask L& T to develop a high performance jet engine. Give them technical help in the beginning from institutions like GTRE. Also maybe fund them for prototype building. They may take a decade to deliver. But at least a sincere effort will be made.

Or at least ask our R & AW to try to steal the technology from other countries. Everybody does that especially China. Hire ex employees of global jet engine companies like Rolls Royce, General Electric, Pratt & Whitney, Snecma etc. Pay them very high salaries.

And to add to the pessimism we do not have any flying test bed in the country. I hope the Government takes the issue seriously.
 

Karthi

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FB_IMG_1600316403482.jpg





IAF and ADA have confirmed that India’s first 5th generation AMCA fighter jet will come in Mark-1 and Mark-2 configuration with 40 jets to come in Mark-1 to be configured with F414-INS6 engines which generate 98kN Class of Wet Thrust which will also power Tejas Mk2 jet and also Carrier based TEDBF jet but GE’s plans to offer its F414 Enhanced Engine with uprated Class of Wet Thrust to India for AMCA Mark-2 could be turned down even if GE agrees for full Transfer of Technology (ToT) as demanded by India for local manufacturing of India in a Joint venture setup, as planners are now considering much more advance engines options for the AMCA Mark-2 fighter jet.

Reliable sources close to idrw.org for the first time has confirmed that any variants of F414 or EJ-200 engines will simply not be acceptable for the IAF since these engines were never developed keeping in mind the reduced thermal signature technology required for Stealth fighter jets in the rear end and nor can be classified as to be used for 5.5 Generation AMCA which India plans for its Mark-2 version. 5.5 Generation AMCA will require an engine that is not only equipped with next-generation but also radical state-of-the-art jet engine technology that has future growth potential for usage on 6th generation Manned and Unammned programs.

Thermal Management System and Increased electrical power generation capability coupled with an intelligent power management system with usage of advanced composite materials are some of the technologies which IAF/ADA are considering and this simply can’t come from existing engines which were conceived nearly 20-25 years back even if upgraded with newer technologies since many of new features require many deep core modifications which are simply not possible.

AMCA Mark-1 will be 5th generation aircraft that will carry many new technologies that are usually classified for a 5th Generation fighter jet aircraft like frontal stealth characters, DSI intakes, 360° multi-spectrum sensors, and next-generation AESA Fire control Radar and EW technology. Since India is little late to join the 5th Generation fighter jet bandwagon, when other countries are already planning for 6th generation fighter jets post-2030, IAF and ADA have decided to incorporate many new features of the 6th generation fighter jets in AMCA Mark-2 when it enters production in 2035.

AMCA Mark-2 will be classified as a 5.5th Generation aircraft not only because of new engines nor because it will have Basic 5th Generation technology but it has been planned to feature some of the 6th generation technology which most countries are currently planning which includes directed-energy weapons and Distributed Aperture Sensor (DAS) and host of new features which are under development like Automatic Ground Collision Avoidance System will help regain control of the aircraft in case the pilot loses consciousness or is incapacitated. A helmet-mounted sensor will alert ground control, which will be able to take over the aircraft’s controls to safely land the aircraft which ADA called “Artificial intelligence-based application”.

India is also in talks with Rolls-Royce which previously worked with GE for the development of the F136 engine for F-35 which is now powered by the F135 engine which was developed by Pratt & Whitney. Rolls-Royce has promised to jointly develop a new engine that is not based on the EJ-200 engine which powers Eurofighter Typhoon but has remained mum if it will be based on technology developed for the now-abandoned F136 engine for the F-35 program. Rolls-Royce already is working on a new engine to power the BAE lead Tempest 6th gen fighter jet program which will have its planned flight in 2030 and induction post-2040.

Rolls-Royce has promised India full Intellectual property rights (IPRs) for the proposed engine and full Transfer of Technology (ToT) for the proposed joint venture engine for the AMCA Mark-2 but as per information provided to idrw.org, India will need to spend nearly $2.5 to $3 Billion in initial investment for Prototypes and ground/flight trials of the new engines plus manufacturing and procurement cost besides. but India will get an engine that is future-ready not only for AMCA Mark-2 but also for what will come out after the AMCA program in 2040.

idrw.org
 

samsaptaka

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Rolls-Royce has promised India full Intellectual property rights (IPRs) for the proposed engine and full Transfer of Technology (ToT) for the proposed joint venture engine for the AMCA Mark-2 but as per information provided to idrw.org, India will need to spend nearly $2.5 to $3 Billion in initial investment for Prototypes and ground/flight trials of the new engines plus manufacturing and procurement cost
Babus will never allow that much investment of money in something that will not give them instant kick backs :mad2:
 

shade

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I thought so.
Bro, they need to seriously give more attention to the project. There has been no fresh budget allocation or even plans to revive the project. It is a very technically challenging project and probably as difficult as a nuclear weapons program. That is why so few countries are capable of mass producing good turbofan engines. The technology is highly guarded.

But our indigenous efforts are not enough at all. Money allotted is peanuts compared to the funds allocated for jet engines development in countries like China.
Materials science is a very key part in developing high performance jet engines. Other than the public sector and government institutions I see almost no research being done in aerospace technologies in the private sector. The GTRE should share whatever knowledge that they have on jet engines with private companies who are good in engineering. Like L&T or even Godrej & Boyce. Why not ask L& T to develop a high performance jet engine. Give them technical help in the beginning from institutions like GTRE. Also maybe fund them for prototype building. They may take a decade to deliver. But at least a sincere effort will be made.

Or at least ask our R & AW to try to steal the technology from other countries. Everybody does that especially China. Hire ex employees of global jet engine companies like Rolls Royce, General Electric, Pratt & Whitney, Snecma etc. Pay them very high salaries.

And to add to the pessimism we do not have any flying test bed in the country. I hope the Government takes the issue seriously.
Nobody cares lol.
The whole "total war is a thing of the past", "two front war is not even remotely possible" etc thinking pre-dominates, which is why pouring money into kaveri or other R&D intensive projects will never get any interest.
 

mattster

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There are only 4 or 5 companies in the world that can produce a jet engine - RR, GE, Pratt & Whitney , Safran, Saab/Volvo and one or 2 Russian companies but Russian engines are maintenance nightmare

Its not just a question of money - India will be challenged to just manufacture any jet engine from scratch. Because it involves so many specialized companies and suppliers; unless you have invested the manufacturing and scientific & research base, you just cant do it.

The only new country that I can see that can building a somewhat state of the art fighter jet-engine from a clean sheet new design is Japan.
 

no smoking

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Rolls-Royce has promised India full Intellectual property rights (IPRs) for the proposed engine and full Transfer of Technology (ToT) for the proposed joint venture engine for the AMCA Mark-2 but as per information provided to idrw.org, India will need to spend nearly $2.5 to $3 Billion in initial investment for Prototypes and ground/flight trials of the new engines plus manufacturing and procurement cost besides. but India will get an engine that is future-ready not only for AMCA Mark-2 but also for what will come out after the AMCA program in 2040.
For a "Full TOT", this amount is deliberately understated.
 

johnq

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I would suggest making a close-air-support aircraft similar to A-10, but with lower wing loading (more wing area) for high altitude usage, using two non-afterburning Kaveri engines. This would help create a tough aircraft that can support the soldiers, while also help paying for the research to develop the Kaveri engine further. Kaveri engine only had issues with the afterburner thrust, not otherwise.
 

WolfPack86

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No Engine tech transfer yet, Rafale makers didn’t deliver on offsets, says CAG
Coming down heavily on the government’s offset policy for defence procurement, the national auditor cited the example of the 36 Rafale fighter jets bought from Dassault Aviation and said that the French manufacturer has not delivered on its promises regarding transfer of technology.


In a statement issued Wednesday, after its latest reports were tabled in Parliament, the Comptroller and Auditor General (CAG) said: “…it was found that the foreign vendors made various offset commitments to qualify for the main supply contract but later, were not earnest about fulfilling these commitments.”


Referring to the Rafale deal in this context, the CAG said: “For instance, in the offset contract relating to 36 Medium Multi Role Combat Aircraft (MMRCA), the vendors M/s Dassault Aviation and M/s MBDA initially proposed (September 2015) to discharge 30 per cent of their offset obligation by offering high technology to DRDO” (Defence Research and Development Organisation).


The CAG said: “DRDO wanted to obtain Technical Assistance for the indigenous development of engine (Kaveri) for the Light Combat Aircraft. Till date, the Vendor has not confirmed the transfer of this technology.”


The CAG statement does not mention any evaluation of the 50 per cent offset clause that was at the centre of a political firestorm before the 2019 general elections due to the involvement of an Anil Ambani-led Reliance firm on the Indian side.


On August 22, based on a report that the CAG had dropped the audit of the Rafale offset deal, Congress leader Rahul Gandhi had tweeted: “Money was stolen from the Indian exchequer in Rafale.”


When contacted by The Indian Express, an India representative of Dassault Aviation did not comment on the CAG’s statement.


In its statement, the CAG said that from 2005 till March 2018, 46 offset contracts were signed with foreign vendors totalling Rs 66,427 crore.


“Under these contracts, by December 2018, Rs 19,223 crore worth of offsets should have been discharged by the vendors. However, the offsets claimed to have been discharged by them was only Rs 11,396 crore, which was only 59 per cent of the commitment. Further, only 48 per cent (Rs 5,457 crore) of these offset claims submitted by the vendors were accepted by the Ministry,” the CAG noted.


The offset policy was adopted by India in 2005 for all capital defence purchases above Rs 300 crore made through imports. The foreign vendor, or Original Equipment Manufacturer (OEM), was required to invest at least 30 per cent of the value of the purchase in India’s defence or aerospace sectors.


There are several ways for OEMs to meet their offset obligations, including Foreign Direct Investment (FDI), offering free transfer of technology to Indian firms, and purchase of eligible products manufactured by Indian firms. To discharge these obligations, OEMs need to select Indian organisations as partners.


However, the CAG noted that obtaining technology transfer has been a particular failure. It said that “90 per cent of the investment by the vendors was in the form of direct purchase of goods and services from the Indian industry”. Besides, it said, “of the total value of offsets only 3.5 per cent was contracted to be discharged through FDI”.


The audit, CAG said, “did not find a single case where the foreign vendor had transferred high technology to the Indian industry”. It said that “the defence sector is ranked 62nd out of the 63 sectors in India in terms of FD” and there was “hardly any equipment supplied ‘in kind’ to the Indian industry by the foreign vendor”.


“Thus, the objectives of the offset policy remain largely unachieved, even after more than a decade of its adoption,” CAG stated, adding that “the (Defence) Ministry needs to review the policy and its implementation”.
 

Roshan

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No Engine tech transfer yet, Rafale makers didn’t deliver on offsets, says CAG
Coming down heavily on the government’s offset policy for defence procurement, the national auditor cited the example of the 36 Rafale fighter jets bought from Dassault Aviation and said that the French manufacturer has not delivered on its promises regarding transfer of technology.


In a statement issued Wednesday, after its latest reports were tabled in Parliament, the Comptroller and Auditor General (CAG) said: “…it was found that the foreign vendors made various offset commitments to qualify for the main supply contract but later, were not earnest about fulfilling these commitments.”


Referring to the Rafale deal in this context, the CAG said: “For instance, in the offset contract relating to 36 Medium Multi Role Combat Aircraft (MMRCA), the vendors M/s Dassault Aviation and M/s MBDA initially proposed (September 2015) to discharge 30 per cent of their offset obligation by offering high technology to DRDO” (Defence Research and Development Organisation).


The CAG said: “DRDO wanted to obtain Technical Assistance for the indigenous development of engine (Kaveri) for the Light Combat Aircraft. Till date, the Vendor has not confirmed the transfer of this technology.”


The CAG statement does not mention any evaluation of the 50 per cent offset clause that was at the centre of a political firestorm before the 2019 general elections due to the involvement of an Anil Ambani-led Reliance firm on the Indian side.


On August 22, based on a report that the CAG had dropped the audit of the Rafale offset deal, Congress leader Rahul Gandhi had tweeted: “Money was stolen from the Indian exchequer in Rafale.”


When contacted by The Indian Express, an India representative of Dassault Aviation did not comment on the CAG’s statement.


In its statement, the CAG said that from 2005 till March 2018, 46 offset contracts were signed with foreign vendors totalling Rs 66,427 crore.


“Under these contracts, by December 2018, Rs 19,223 crore worth of offsets should have been discharged by the vendors. However, the offsets claimed to have been discharged by them was only Rs 11,396 crore, which was only 59 per cent of the commitment. Further, only 48 per cent (Rs 5,457 crore) of these offset claims submitted by the vendors were accepted by the Ministry,” the CAG noted.


The offset policy was adopted by India in 2005 for all capital defence purchases above Rs 300 crore made through imports. The foreign vendor, or Original Equipment Manufacturer (OEM), was required to invest at least 30 per cent of the value of the purchase in India’s defence or aerospace sectors.


There are several ways for OEMs to meet their offset obligations, including Foreign Direct Investment (FDI), offering free transfer of technology to Indian firms, and purchase of eligible products manufactured by Indian firms. To discharge these obligations, OEMs need to select Indian organisations as partners.


However, the CAG noted that obtaining technology transfer has been a particular failure. It said that “90 per cent of the investment by the vendors was in the form of direct purchase of goods and services from the Indian industry”. Besides, it said, “of the total value of offsets only 3.5 per cent was contracted to be discharged through FDI”.


The audit, CAG said, “did not find a single case where the foreign vendor had transferred high technology to the Indian industry”. It said that “the defence sector is ranked 62nd out of the 63 sectors in India in terms of FD” and there was “hardly any equipment supplied ‘in kind’ to the Indian industry by the foreign vendor”.


“Thus, the objectives of the offset policy remain largely unachieved, even after more than a decade of its adoption,” CAG stated, adding that “the (Defence) Ministry needs to review the policy and its implementation”.
i was going to post this, what does this mean? will congis jump up again like they did before the 2019 elections?
 

Dessert Storm

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No Engine tech transfer yet, Rafale makers didn’t deliver on offsets, says CAG
Coming down heavily on the government’s offset policy for defence procurement, the national auditor cited the example of the 36 Rafale fighter jets bought from Dassault Aviation and said that the French manufacturer has not delivered on its promises regarding transfer of technology.


In a statement issued Wednesday, after its latest reports were tabled in Parliament, the Comptroller and Auditor General (CAG) said: “…it was found that the foreign vendors made various offset commitments to qualify for the main supply contract but later, were not earnest about fulfilling these commitments.”


Referring to the Rafale deal in this context, the CAG said: “For instance, in the offset contract relating to 36 Medium Multi Role Combat Aircraft (MMRCA), the vendors M/s Dassault Aviation and M/s MBDA initially proposed (September 2015) to discharge 30 per cent of their offset obligation by offering high technology to DRDO” (Defence Research and Development Organisation).


The CAG said: “DRDO wanted to obtain Technical Assistance for the indigenous development of engine (Kaveri) for the Light Combat Aircraft. Till date, the Vendor has not confirmed the transfer of this technology.”


The CAG statement does not mention any evaluation of the 50 per cent offset clause that was at the centre of a political firestorm before the 2019 general elections due to the involvement of an Anil Ambani-led Reliance firm on the Indian side.


On August 22, based on a report that the CAG had dropped the audit of the Rafale offset deal, Congress leader Rahul Gandhi had tweeted: “Money was stolen from the Indian exchequer in Rafale.”


When contacted by The Indian Express, an India representative of Dassault Aviation did not comment on the CAG’s statement.


In its statement, the CAG said that from 2005 till March 2018, 46 offset contracts were signed with foreign vendors totalling Rs 66,427 crore.


“Under these contracts, by December 2018, Rs 19,223 crore worth of offsets should have been discharged by the vendors. However, the offsets claimed to have been discharged by them was only Rs 11,396 crore, which was only 59 per cent of the commitment. Further, only 48 per cent (Rs 5,457 crore) of these offset claims submitted by the vendors were accepted by the Ministry,” the CAG noted.


The offset policy was adopted by India in 2005 for all capital defence purchases above Rs 300 crore made through imports. The foreign vendor, or Original Equipment Manufacturer (OEM), was required to invest at least 30 per cent of the value of the purchase in India’s defence or aerospace sectors.


There are several ways for OEMs to meet their offset obligations, including Foreign Direct Investment (FDI), offering free transfer of technology to Indian firms, and purchase of eligible products manufactured by Indian firms. To discharge these obligations, OEMs need to select Indian organisations as partners.


However, the CAG noted that obtaining technology transfer has been a particular failure. It said that “90 per cent of the investment by the vendors was in the form of direct purchase of goods and services from the Indian industry”. Besides, it said, “of the total value of offsets only 3.5 per cent was contracted to be discharged through FDI”.


The audit, CAG said, “did not find a single case where the foreign vendor had transferred high technology to the Indian industry”. It said that “the defence sector is ranked 62nd out of the 63 sectors in India in terms of FD” and there was “hardly any equipment supplied ‘in kind’ to the Indian industry by the foreign vendor”.


“Thus, the objectives of the offset policy remain largely unachieved, even after more than a decade of its adoption,” CAG stated, adding that “the (Defence) Ministry needs to review the policy and its implementation”.
That's a catch 22 for the govt. If they place further orders, there is danger of the French not fulfilling the committments in future too. If orders are not placed then we stand to lose a lot of investment in training and infrastructure plus the cost of operating a small fleet.
 

Chinmoy

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No Engine tech transfer yet, Rafale makers didn’t deliver on offsets, says CAG
Coming down heavily on the government’s offset policy for defence procurement, the national auditor cited the example of the 36 Rafale fighter jets bought from Dassault Aviation and said that the French manufacturer has not delivered on its promises regarding transfer of technology.


In a statement issued Wednesday, after its latest reports were tabled in Parliament, the Comptroller and Auditor General (CAG) said: “…it was found that the foreign vendors made various offset commitments to qualify for the main supply contract but later, were not earnest about fulfilling these commitments.”


Referring to the Rafale deal in this context, the CAG said: “For instance, in the offset contract relating to 36 Medium Multi Role Combat Aircraft (MMRCA), the vendors M/s Dassault Aviation and M/s MBDA initially proposed (September 2015) to discharge 30 per cent of their offset obligation by offering high technology to DRDO” (Defence Research and Development Organisation).


The CAG said: “DRDO wanted to obtain Technical Assistance for the indigenous development of engine (Kaveri) for the Light Combat Aircraft. Till date, the Vendor has not confirmed the transfer of this technology.”


The CAG statement does not mention any evaluation of the 50 per cent offset clause that was at the centre of a political firestorm before the 2019 general elections due to the involvement of an Anil Ambani-led Reliance firm on the Indian side.


On August 22, based on a report that the CAG had dropped the audit of the Rafale offset deal, Congress leader Rahul Gandhi had tweeted: “Money was stolen from the Indian exchequer in Rafale.”


When contacted by The Indian Express, an India representative of Dassault Aviation did not comment on the CAG’s statement.


In its statement, the CAG said that from 2005 till March 2018, 46 offset contracts were signed with foreign vendors totalling Rs 66,427 crore.


“Under these contracts, by December 2018, Rs 19,223 crore worth of offsets should have been discharged by the vendors. However, the offsets claimed to have been discharged by them was only Rs 11,396 crore, which was only 59 per cent of the commitment. Further, only 48 per cent (Rs 5,457 crore) of these offset claims submitted by the vendors were accepted by the Ministry,” the CAG noted.


The offset policy was adopted by India in 2005 for all capital defence purchases above Rs 300 crore made through imports. The foreign vendor, or Original Equipment Manufacturer (OEM), was required to invest at least 30 per cent of the value of the purchase in India’s defence or aerospace sectors.


There are several ways for OEMs to meet their offset obligations, including Foreign Direct Investment (FDI), offering free transfer of technology to Indian firms, and purchase of eligible products manufactured by Indian firms. To discharge these obligations, OEMs need to select Indian organisations as partners.


However, the CAG noted that obtaining technology transfer has been a particular failure. It said that “90 per cent of the investment by the vendors was in the form of direct purchase of goods and services from the Indian industry”. Besides, it said, “of the total value of offsets only 3.5 per cent was contracted to be discharged through FDI”.


The audit, CAG said, “did not find a single case where the foreign vendor had transferred high technology to the Indian industry”. It said that “the defence sector is ranked 62nd out of the 63 sectors in India in terms of FD” and there was “hardly any equipment supplied ‘in kind’ to the Indian industry by the foreign vendor”.


“Thus, the objectives of the offset policy remain largely unachieved, even after more than a decade of its adoption,” CAG stated, adding that “the (Defence) Ministry needs to review the policy and its implementation”.
Old news repacked.
 

Abhay Rajput 02

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That's a catch 22 for the govt. If they place further orders, there is danger of the French not fulfilling the committments in future too. If orders are not placed then we stand to lose a lot of investment in training and infrastructure plus the cost of operating a small fleet.
Nobody will give you the crown jewel of aviation. That too in such a low price.
 

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