Indian Navy Developments & Discussions

sorcerer

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Thales Selected by Lockheed Martin to deliver ALFS Dipping Sonars to US Navy and FMS Customers


Thales has delivered more than 300 ALFS sonars to the U.S. Navy since the early 2000s and this new contract with Lockheed Martin will continue to support the Navy’s readiness strategy. The navies of India, Denmark and Greece will receive their first deliveries of the ALFS sonar system through direct U.S. Foreign Military Sales of the MH-60R platforms.
 

Anandhu Krishna

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It seems after vaccine episode everyone wake up from their slumber. Imagine the investment made in P8, C130,C 17,Chinook,Apache. Now they want to shove F 16 MMRCA down our throat. They will hold us by our balls and we will dance to their tune.

Indigenous, French,Israel and Russia should be our primary axis for defence procurement.
yes, yes and a big YES
 

sorcerer

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ALH Mk-III helicopter successful in deck trial on Coast Guard ship [details]

The sense of gloom that's been pervading any news coming from India took a momentary pause when the Indian Coast Guard shared its latest achievement on social media handles and also through official channels.


"In a sea-air coordinated Op, first-ever successful landing and deck trial of newly inducted 'State-of-the-Art' ALH Mk-III helicopter on ICG ship undertaken off Chennai on 26 April 21. A landmark event in ship integration of this indigenously-built helicopter," shared the ICG, Ministry of Defence.

 

RAM

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http://www.indiandefensenews.in/2021/05/images-of-indias-military-base-in.html


Recent spy shots have revealed India is in advanced stages of building a naval and air base in Mauritius. The defence facility, for which India requested access in 2015, is on North Agalega Island and will serve as an air and naval staging point for surveillance around south-west Indian Ocean. A joint US-UK base already exists at Diego Garcia in Mauritius.


A Lowy Institute report, which compared the most recent images from Google Earth to the same location as seen in 2014, said a new 3000-metre runway is now clearly visible with considerable apron overshadows. The project, the report said, entails a new airport, port and logistics and communication facilities. So far, project details have been kept tightly under the wraps by both India and Mauritius.

The imagery also shows what looks like barracks and fields which could be used as parade grounds or sporting facilities located near the north end of the runway. These images do not readily show evidence of fuel storage facilities or communications and intelligence installations. Such equipment and facilities are expected to be visible in future imagery, the report said.

The Lowy Institute report also refers to India’s failed attempt to build a new naval and air facility on Seychelles’ Assumption Island to develop its military access to the south-west Indian Ocean and Mozambique Channel.






Images of India’s Military Base In Mauritius Revealed
 
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sorcerer

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India close to inking another mega deal for P-8I sub-killers with the US | India News - Times of India

NEW DELHI: India is now close to inking the $2.42 billion deal with the US for six more advanced P-8I submarine-hunting aircraft, which will take the total value of lucrative Indian defence contracts bagged by Washington in the last 15 years to around $25 billion.
The State Department and Pentagon on Friday notified the US Congress about the impending deal for the six P-8I aircraft and related equipment to India.


 
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WolfPack86

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Faced with budget crunch, Navy could relook at long-term modernisation plans, lease vessels
New Delhi:
The Navy will have to recalibrate its immediate and long-term capital requirements, particularly in view of the threats from China after over a nine-month standoff in eastern Ladakh, a top Naval officer said.

This will likely include reassessing the numbers for landing platform docks (LPDs) and minesweepers originally planned by the Navy, among other items, for which the acceptance of necessity (AoN) has already been accorded.


In the wake of a dwindling capital budget in the last few years, the Navy cut down its plans to be a 200-warship force — down to 175 — and reduced the numbers of some of its long-term planned procurements.

During a press meet in 2019, Navy chief Admiral Karambir Singh had pointed out that the Navy’s share of defence budget fell from 18 per cent in 2012-13 to 13 per cent in 2019-20. “It is a fact that our budget has decreased. We have projected this. Our hope is that we will get some money and accordingly we will prioritise,” Singh had said.

The force cut down the number of LPDs it was seeking to buy to two from the planned four, and the number of minesweepers to eight from 12, aside from cutting down on other fleet auxiliary ships.




The Navy also decided to procure only six Kamov KA-31 early warning helicopters against the 10 planned originally, and brought down the number of additional P-8I aircraft it sought to buy from the US to six from 10. Moreover, it reportedly planned to close the cadet training ship programme.

The Navy also decided to procure only six Kamov KA-31 early warning helicopters against the 10 planned originally, and brought down the number of additional P-8I aircraft it sought to buy from the US to six from 10. Moreover, it reportedly planned to close the cadet training ship programme.

However, irrespective of the Navy’s plans to bring down the numbers of its planned procurements as envisaged in its Maritime Capability Perspective Plan (MCPP) for 2012-2027, the AoNs for many of its big ticket procurements were already approved. Since the AoNs exist for certain planned procurements, there is possibly of going back to the original numbers planned.

“…there is a need for a relook and a reassessment of the Navy’s immediate and long term capital requirements as planned earlier, for which there would be a requirement of more funds,” said the officer quoted above.


The officer declined to comment on the specifics of which other capital procurements would need a reassessment.

In the capital budget for 2021-2022, the Navy saw an increase of 24.6 per cent at Rs 33,000 crore from its previous year’s allocations, but it was much lower than the force’s projected requirement of Rs 70,920.78 crore.


The Army saw an increase of 12.6 per cent and the Air Force saw a hike of 22.9 per cent in their capital budgets for 2021-22 as compared to the previous fiscal.

Speaking about the 15th Finance Commission’s proposals, which suggested raising funds from defence land monetisation, the officer said it is yet to be seen how the concept can be materialised.


“The monetisation of defence land will yield some funds, which would be used up immediately for some immediate procurement. But this way, we will lose the land and the funds too will be exhausted immediately,” the officer said.


Considering leasing vessels
The Navy could also be looking at leasing vessels as an interim measure. This includes diving support vessels that can also double up as a submarine rescue vessel.

“The Navy is looking at leasing different kinds of vessels, including diving support vessels and other smaller ships,” said the officer quoted above.

The force is also looking at leasing small fuelling tankers, which can be used for support trips and other logistical purposes.

Besides, the Navy is in the process of gathering information from other countries from where it could lease minesweepers and naval utility helicopters as a stop-gap arrangement, even as it will continue to pursue the original contract for such systems to be made in India with foreign collaboration, said sources.

The Navy currently has on lease two Sea Guardian drones from a US firm, and a logistics ship from an Indian private firm for travel between Kochi and Lakshadweep.
 

Dark Sorrow

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Faced with budget crunch, Navy could relook at long-term modernisation plans, lease vessels
New Delhi:
The Navy will have to recalibrate its immediate and long-term capital requirements, particularly in view of the threats from China after over a nine-month standoff in eastern Ladakh, a top Naval officer said.

This will likely include reassessing the numbers for landing platform docks (LPDs) and minesweepers originally planned by the Navy, among other items, for which the acceptance of necessity (AoN) has already been accorded.


In the wake of a dwindling capital budget in the last few years, the Navy cut down its plans to be a 200-warship force — down to 175 — and reduced the numbers of some of its long-term planned procurements.

During a press meet in 2019, Navy chief Admiral Karambir Singh had pointed out that the Navy’s share of defence budget fell from 18 per cent in 2012-13 to 13 per cent in 2019-20. “It is a fact that our budget has decreased. We have projected this. Our hope is that we will get some money and accordingly we will prioritise,” Singh had said.

The force cut down the number of LPDs it was seeking to buy to two from the planned four, and the number of minesweepers to eight from 12, aside from cutting down on other fleet auxiliary ships.




The Navy also decided to procure only six Kamov KA-31 early warning helicopters against the 10 planned originally, and brought down the number of additional P-8I aircraft it sought to buy from the US to six from 10. Moreover, it reportedly planned to close the cadet training ship programme.

The Navy also decided to procure only six Kamov KA-31 early warning helicopters against the 10 planned originally, and brought down the number of additional P-8I aircraft it sought to buy from the US to six from 10. Moreover, it reportedly planned to close the cadet training ship programme.

However, irrespective of the Navy’s plans to bring down the numbers of its planned procurements as envisaged in its Maritime Capability Perspective Plan (MCPP) for 2012-2027, the AoNs for many of its big ticket procurements were already approved. Since the AoNs exist for certain planned procurements, there is possibly of going back to the original numbers planned.

“…there is a need for a relook and a reassessment of the Navy’s immediate and long term capital requirements as planned earlier, for which there would be a requirement of more funds,” said the officer quoted above.


The officer declined to comment on the specifics of which other capital procurements would need a reassessment.

In the capital budget for 2021-2022, the Navy saw an increase of 24.6 per cent at Rs 33,000 crore from its previous year’s allocations, but it was much lower than the force’s projected requirement of Rs 70,920.78 crore.


The Army saw an increase of 12.6 per cent and the Air Force saw a hike of 22.9 per cent in their capital budgets for 2021-22 as compared to the previous fiscal.

Speaking about the 15th Finance Commission’s proposals, which suggested raising funds from defence land monetisation, the officer said it is yet to be seen how the concept can be materialised.


“The monetisation of defence land will yield some funds, which would be used up immediately for some immediate procurement. But this way, we will lose the land and the funds too will be exhausted immediately,” the officer said.


Considering leasing vessels
The Navy could also be looking at leasing vessels as an interim measure. This includes diving support vessels that can also double up as a submarine rescue vessel.

“The Navy is looking at leasing different kinds of vessels, including diving support vessels and other smaller ships,” said the officer quoted above.

The force is also looking at leasing small fuelling tankers, which can be used for support trips and other logistical purposes.

Besides, the Navy is in the process of gathering information from other countries from where it could lease minesweepers and naval utility helicopters as a stop-gap arrangement, even as it will continue to pursue the original contract for such systems to be made in India with foreign collaboration, said sources.

The Navy currently has on lease two Sea Guardian drones from a US firm, and a logistics ship from an Indian private firm for travel between Kochi and Lakshadweep.
Its high time to reduce army personal count and divert this fund to air-force, navy and other new branched tri-service command like Armed Forces Special Operations Division, Defence Space Agency and Defence Cyber Agency.
Gone are the days when army used to dominate battlefield. Modern wars are decided by air-force and to certain extent navy.
 

sorcerer

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Orbiter 4 finds maritime surveillance and patrol uses, says Aeronautics

Orbiter 4 can take off and land on any vessel; it has ‘already been fully integrated into the operational environment of navy vessels, and meets the requirements of navy operations’, Aeronautics claimed, adding: ‘Operated by only three personnel, it is easy to use, maintain, and carries a low logistical footprint.’


According to Shephard Defence Insight, India-based Mahindra Defence has an MoU with Aeronautics Group to offer a maritime version of the Orbiter 4 UAS for the Indian Navy.


 
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This is great. More than 260 SDRs of different types are being procured under the Indigenously Designed Developed and Manufactured category already. Vedanta Group’s Pune-based Sterlite Tech, a digital networks and telecom solutions company, bagged a Rs.3,500 crore contract from the Indian Navy deal to design, build, operate and maintain the NAVNET. The multi-year contract includes design, execution, operations and maintenance of the NAVNET. Sterlite Tech will build a robust integrated communications network that would provide a secure, reliable and seamless digital highway to the Indian Navy for administrative and operational applications.
 

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