Indian Navy Developments & Discussions

Killbot

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He said coastal defence... AMCA from airbase runway will takeoff with more load that Teddy from aircraft-carriers skyjump.

I'm not saying they'll use it. But it can. Other than Su-30, AMCA would be out 2nd most high payload fighter.
More than MWF at sea level?

edit: NVM, MWF payload is +/-7.5 tons
 

Lonewolf

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He said coastal defence... AMCA from airbase runway will takeoff with more load that Teddy from aircraft-carriers skyjump.

I'm not saying they'll use it. But it can. Other than Su-30, AMCA would be out 2nd most high payload fighter.
Don't forget teddy , without wing folding and lighter landing gear .
 

Bleh

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More than MWF at sea level?
Don't forget teddy , without wing folding and lighter landing gear .
2 tons more (same external load), plus possibly more fuel (presently unknown how much 4ton to 6.5ton have been heard)!.. It has twice the thrust, but due to small conventional wings the payload increment won't be proportional.

ORCA (land Teddy basically) with its delta-canard would easily do 10tons.
 

SARTHAK

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Or we could just use MWF. Cheaper flying costs, higher payload, higher availability etc, etc.
yes ,that will be good ,but i hve a condition for it, ALL sensors of amca SHALL be ported to tejas mk2(which is almost confirmed except conformal antenne)

confirmed specs

dcmaws (upgraded) to be fitted on tejas mk2 ,it is basically a less advanced version of f35 eots das
rwr ng- tender issued to drdo (it will have ,issile cueing capability at wvr range without turning on the radar ,when used with dcmaws ,it will be lethal,also rwr will be interferometric based
sensor fusion
net centric warfare
GaN jammers
rcs lower than mk1a (<0.4)
low band jammers
retractable fuel probe
 

vasusuman

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vasusuman

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For all those know may not be aware of Importance location of Lakshadweep Islands,let me clarify.FYI,we have v strong Naval bases here.

1.For all the Oil Tankers,which load oil from Persian Gulf(meaning all of Gulf countries as S Arabia,Kuwait,UAE,Iran,Iraq,etc) and going to East Asia- they have to pass close to these Islands as shortest route,no other option is there.They can avoid coming close to S Kerala, but avoiding these Islands will be totally non economical.

These Islands show v Maritime Traffic n this is the place where Coast Guard/Navy checks ship's identities.

2.Andaman n Nicobar Is - After Lakshadweep,the closest point they come to India is A&N Island,S part of which is India Point - should they want to Use Singapore St to cross to East Asia.Most of ships do.
But during conflict times should they want to avoid Singapore n Malacca St,they will go South of Sumatera Is lands n use Sunda/Lombok St.In this case A&N Islands wont be so effective.

Lakshdweep Islands - has v strategic value n also great tourism opportunity.

Importance of Lakshadweep Islands.jpg
 

Gerlat

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Indian Navy will get INS Karanj on March 10, destroys target in just a blink of eyes

its an article in Newstrack..so not posting the link
Target with what ? Any update on torpedoes ? Thanks.
 

WolfPack86

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Explainer: Turkey turning ‘supplier’ for navies of India, Pakistan?
On Tuesday, the Hindustan Times reported Hindustan Shipyard Limited, the Visakhapatnam-based shipbuilder, was expecting a major Indian Navy contract by this year-end.

The contract involves the construction of five 'fleet support ships', which have the vital role of resupplying warships at sea with spare parts, fuel, food, weapons and other equipment. In June 2019, Hindustan Shipyard had selected TAIS, a consortium of Turkish shipbuilding companies, as its partner for the fleet support ship project. The Turkish consortium was selected over offers from Russian and German companies.


According to the original agreement, TAIS would provide Hindustan Shipyard assistance in design and supply of machinery to build the five ships. The total value of the contract to Hindustan Shipyard would be about $2.3 billion, with the builder estimated to take about eight years to complete all five vessels.

The project to build the fleet support ships with Turkish assistance was delayed and faced uncertainty, in part due to Turkey's vocal support for Pakistan's stance on Jammu and Kashmir. On Monday, Hindustan Times quoted a source as saying, "The agreement with the Turkish consortium will kick in after HSL gets an order from the Indian Navy. If all goes well, that could happen by October 2021. Several Indian vendors will also be involved in the project." The Hindustan Times also reported "... the Turkish side has decided to go ahead with transfer of technology from the initial stages and back the 'Make in India' initiative..."

While less glamorous and menacing in appearance than sleek destroyers and mammoth aircraft carriers, the fleet support ships will be a key element in enabling the Indian Navy to stay at sea. Their importance has only increased as the Indian Navy has embraced the concept of 'mission-based deployment' of warships, with vessels remaining stationed away from base for several months.

Moreover, the five fleet support ships would be among the largest ships of the Indian Navy. Hindustan Times reported, "The vessels will be 230 metres long and have a displacement of 45,000 tonnes," which would make them just smaller than aircraft carriers.

Pakistan link

A successful deal with Hindustan Shipyard would mark the biggest venture by Turkey into India's arms market. However, Turkey is already a key supplier to Pakistan.

In 2018, the Pakistan Navy commissioned the PNS Moawin, a fleet support ship, built with assistance from Turkish company STM. The Moawin is significantly smaller than the ships being offered to the Indian Navy, having a displacement of around 17,000 tonnes. In 2016, STM won a $350 million contract to upgrade Pakistan's fleet of French-designed Agosta 90B submarines with new sonars, periscopes, electronics and self-defence systems.

In 2018, Pakistan announced a contract with Turkey to build four 'MILGEM' class corvettes for the Pakistan Navy. Corvettes are small warships, displacing around 2,000 tonnes and that carry missiles and torpedoes for anti-ship and anti-submarine warfare and also air-defence roles. The MILGEM contract, valued at $1.5 billion, was in 2018, described as Turkey's largest defence export deal. A shipyard in Istanbul is building two MILGEM ships, while two are being built in Karachi. The four MILGEM class ships for Pakistan will, reportedly, carry a Chinese-built medium-range surface-to-air missile system.

Over the last decade, Turkish arms companies have spread their wings to emerge as an exporter of affordable weaponry. They have been most famous for sales of drones. However, Turkish companies have also sold small naval patrol craft and remote-controlled gun systems to countries in the Middle East and Asia.
 

WolfPack86

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Pawan Hans in talks with Indian Navy for Copter requirement
State-owned helicopter operator Pawan Hans is in talks with the Indian Navy to supply on lease utility choppers that are urgently needed to plug a critical gap that threatens to dull operational capability.

With plans to acquire new utility choppers stuck due to delays in the procurement process, the Navy has been looking at an option to lease 12-16 choppers on an immediate basis, a number that could possibly go significantly up if the model works.

Sources have told ET that Pawan Hans is projecting itself as a reliable option to the Navy, leveraging on the fact that it has an existing fleet of choppers fit for the role and operational hub co-located with a major naval base in Mumbai.

While the Navy is yet to decide on how to go ahead, a leasing contract could significantly increase the attractiveness of Pawan Hans for investors. The helicopter company is currently up for disinvestment of all government stake, with at least four bids received by private parties.

Pawan Hans did not respond to a query by ET on its talks with the Navy. The Navy is facing an acute shortage of helicopters, with its fleet of Chetak choppers nearing the end of service life. It does have the indigenous Advanced Light Helicopters (ALH) in service but the choppers are unable to operate from all platforms.

The Navy has been trying to push ahead a ₹21,000 crore Make in India contract to acquire new Naval Utility Helicopters (NUH) but the programme has been delayed after complications over the entry of public sector unit HAL.

Given that the planned procurement would take at least six years before the first chopper is delivered, the Navy has been looking at the option of leasing choppers to plug this gap, which would later be retrofitted with light weapons as per its requirement.

As reported, the Navy had approached foreign vendors in December to understand if such choppers can be made available for short-term lease. The requirement projected was for 12-16 helicopters where the leasing company could maintain the aircraft that would be operated by a Navy crew. Sources said while several leasing companies operate with fairly large fleet size, it would not be easy for them to offer choppers to the Navy, given the risk of operational flying and the challenges in getting such machines insured.
 

WolfPack86

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Airbus in talks with Indian Navy to lease out Panther helicopters
Bengaluru: European Aviation giant Airbus is in talks with the Indian Navy to lease out Panther helicopters for its warships as the force looks at bridging the capability gap it faces when it comes to the rotary wing, Rémi Maillard, president of Airbus India and the company’s managing director for South Asia, told ThePrint.

The development comes as the nearly $3 billion plan to procure 111 Naval Utility Helicopters (NUH) staggers on due to multiple reasons.

“We are ready to offer leasing options and this is an excellent opportunity to meet the short-term immediate operational requirements, especially in the Indian Ocean. We believe there is a capability gap in the Indian Ocean Region and we would be delighted to offer our helicopters to the Indian Navy,” Maillard told ThePrint in an interview at Aero India 2021.

The Narendra Modi government has allowed the armed forces to procure military equipment on lease under the Defence Acquisition Procedure (DAP) 2020.

Airbus is also likely to lease out two A330 multi-role tanker transport (MRTT) to the IAF.

Asked if leasing makes sense for an armed force, Maillard said it does, complementary to the procurement process. “The advantage of leasing is that you can quickly access the capability. Many countries are doing that. We provide leasing capabilities as well,” he added.

Asked about the numbers being talked about for leasing of the choppers, he said talks have not moved to that stage yet.

“We have not received the RFP (Request for Proposal), but we are very keen on supporting the Navy. We are in talks with the Navy, we have an excellent relationship with the Navy, and we have already discussed about this leasing opportunity,” the top Airbus official said.

‘Leasing the initial step’
The AS565 MBe naval version of Airbus’ Panther family of helicopters is an all-weather, multi-role medium rotorcraft, designed for operations from ship decks, offshore locations and land-based sites.

The aircraft is made for a multitude of naval and coast guard missions such as maritime surveillance, search and rescue, casualty evacuation, offshore patrolling and counter-terrorism.

The Navy has been desperate to replace its Chetak helicopters of 1960s vintage with NUHs.

The NUHs are to be utilised for multiple roles, including search and rescue, casualty evacuation and low-intensity maritime operations, besides torpedo drops.

There has been a push from the HAL to include its helicopter as one of the contenders for the Naval contract, but the proposal has met with resistance from the Navy.

The leasing of the Panthers comes even as the French government and Airbus have offered to set up an assembly line for the helicopter in India.

“Leasing is the initial step. We remain committed to the defence procurement process but we are also keen on offering a leasing opportunity to meet the operational requirement in the meantime,” Maillard said.

On the verge of getting defence contracts
The Airbus, which has had a presence in India for over five decades, has not bagged any major defence contract in years.

However, this could change as India is likely to sign a deal with Airbus for the manufacturing of C295 transport aircraft as a replacement for the IAF’s Avro fleet.

“It is correct that we did not get any contract recently. But our relationship goes back to 50 years ago when we had cooperation with the HAL (Hindustan Aeronautics Limited) for Cheetah and Chetak helicopters. We have had a good relationship with Indian partners and forces,” Maillard said.

Talking about the campaigns ahead, he said the first was the C295, which “can be a gamechanger for India, the IAF and Airbus”. “This is because that will be first final assembly line of an aircraft in India,” he added.

“The demand is for 56 aircraft. The first 16 would be assembled at the Airbus facility in Spain. The rest 40 will be manufactured, assembled and tested and maintained in India with our partner TATA. We believe we will be the trigger to develop a total aerospace ecosystem in India,” he said.

The Airbus executive said the project will create “15,000 skilled jobs in India”.

“C295 is the capability that the IAF requires. It is versatile, reliable and a combat-proven platform. We are hopeful that we will be able to sign this contract and start our partnership with TATA and also start construction of Indian assembly line,” he added.

Maillard said Airbus has made a competing offer — “a very attractive offer” — to the Union Ministry of Defence.

“It makes a lot of sense for India, for the IAF… I am hopeful that it will go through soon. I am positive, I am optimistic and I know it is for the best,” he said.
 

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