Indian Navy Developments & Discussions

Neeraj Mathur

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i have a question if it has been answered before pls point me to it

in both our destroyer class we have used Ukraine engines but in our frigates like Shivalik and nilgiri class we ar installing GE engines.

is there any reason for doing this?
 

WolfPack86

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Indian Navy's lethal 'Romeo': 1st look of new MH-60R submarine hunter
Less than an year after US President Donald Trump announced that the Indian Navy would buy 24 MH-60R Sea Hawk anti-submarine warfare helicopters, Lockheed Martin released the first photograph of the aircraft in Indian markings on Friday.

Over the past week, Lockheed Martin India had been teasing on its Twitter handle that the MH-60R 'Romeo' for the Indian Navy would be unveiled as part of Navy Day celebrations on December 4.

In May, Sikorsky, a subsidiary of Lockheed Martin, signed a contract to build the MH-60R for the Indian Navy. In May, Breaking Defense, a US defence publication, reported that the US would be delivering the MH-60R on a priority basis to India. Breaking Defense reported, "… The US Navy allowed Sikorsky to take three of its brand-new MH-60R Sea Hawks and begin modifying them to Indian standards to deliver next spring." The accelerated delivery plan was attributed to the growing activities of the Chinese navy in the Indian Ocean.

The MH-60R is the primary anti-submarine and anti-surface warfare helicopter of the US Navy. It can also be used for troop transport and cargo missions. The MH-60R is the latest naval derivative of a family of helicopters derived from the iconic Sikorsky Black Hawk. The MH-60R is currently in service with the US Navy, Royal Danish Navy, Royal Australian Navy and Royal Saudi Naval Forces. It has also been ordered by Greece.

The original deal, valued at $2.6 billion, for the 24 MH-60R helicopters envisaged the sale of anti-submarine torpedoes, Hellfire anti-ship missiles and a guided rocket system to attack small boats. The MH-60R's sensors, including sonars, radar and optical systems, will provide a quantum leap in detection capability to the Indian Navy.

The MH-60R helicopters will be the first new western heavy anti-submarine helicopters to enter Indian Navy service after the British-supplied Sea King first entered service in July 1971. The Sea King remains in service with the Indian Navy, but in dwindling numbers.

The Indian Navy could end up buying far more than 24 MH-60R helicopters; the Indian Navy has a requirement for 123 such heavy-duty helicopters.
 

WolfPack86

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NAVY COULD TAKE MINESWEEPER VESSELS & HELICOPTERS ON LEASE
New Delhi: The Navy is looking at leasing an unspecified number of mine counter measure vessels (MCMVs) and naval utility helicopters (NUHs) to fill a critical gap even as it pursues a larger contract for such systems to be made in India with foreign collaboration.


The Navy, which has taken on lease two Sea Guardian drones from a US firm besides a logistics ship from an Indian private firm for travel between Kochi and Lakshadweep, is looking at leasing certain equipment, sources in the defence and security establishment said.

It took two months from the movement of the file for the drones to arrive in India.

The drones were leased while India pursues a larger tri-service procurement of 30 lethal Predator drones from the US.

Talking about future leasing plans, a Navy source said, “We have sought information for possible lease of MCMVs. We are actively looking at getting them.”

The source added that the force is looking at the option of leasing equipment wherever there is a capability gap and the time to overcome it takes longer than what is convenient.

“The leasing is not just for training and familiarisation process. There are certain areas where there is a huge capability gap. While the larger procurement process is on to fill the gaps, leasing of such equipment can be used in the interim period,” the source said.

Giving the example of MCMVs that are used to clear harbours and other critical areas of mines laid by enemy submarines and vessels, the source said countries like Russia, South Korea and even the US have such equipment which can be taken on lease.

At one point, the Navy had 12 of them, but now have zero now and are dependent on kits fitted on smaller ships to counter the threat.

The Navy has been unsuccessfully trying to procure these vessels since 2005. Attempts to procure MCMVs from South Korea’s Kangnam Corporation failed after the company was hit with controversy twice, ultimately leading to the cancellation of the project.

The first controversy broke during the UPA government when allegations that the firm had appointed ‘consultants’ for the contract, in a violation of Indian procurement rules, surfaced. The firm came back into the picture a second time when Manohar Parrikar was defence minister. It was shortlisted to tie up with Goa Shipyard Ltd (GSL) for the contract.

However, when Nirmala Sithraman became defence minister, she cancelled the contract after the company failed to commit fully on Transfer of Technology (ToT).

Other Lease Plans

Sources said NUHs could also be taken on lease under the Strategic Partnership (SP).

Addressing his annual press conference Thursday, Navy chief Admiral Karambir Singh had indicated the force is not looking at the NUHs being offered by state-run Hindustan Aeronautics Limited.

Replying to a query, Admiral Singh said the NUHs are being pursued under SP, which is aimed at providing an impetus to private defence players.

The Navy, which was in talks with HAL over the helicopter deal worth USD 3 billion, is no longer keen on acquiring the aircraft.

Navy Firm On Third Aircraft Carrier

Admiral Singh has strongly come out in support of a third aircraft carrier, saying it is needed as the Indian economy grows towards the USD 5 trillion goal.

He said the Navy will formally move the proposal to the government for a third aircraft carrier after gathering the technical information sought from various countries.

“As the Navy, we are absolutely clear of the utility of the carrier. This is because air operations are integral to naval operations, and air power at sea is required since the Navy is all about reach and sustenance,” he said.

He added: “If you are a nation that is aspiration and you want to become a USD 5 trillion economy shortly and you want to do well, you will have to go outwards and seek the world. The nation does not want to be navy tethered to shore. For that aircraft carriers are absolutely necessary.”

In February the Navy is firm on its plans for a third aircraft carrier despite Chief of Defence Staff (CDS) General Bipin Rawat’s scepticism. The Indian Navy currently operates aircraft carrier INS Vikramaditya, while INS Vikrant is under construction in Cochin and is due for commissioning in 2022.

Both vessels have a displacement (measure of a vessel’s weight) of 45,000 tonnes each and the Navy is keen on a third vessel of higher displacement.
 

WolfPack86

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Indian Defence Updates : 3 TEDBF By 2028,3 Kilo Submarine Deal,DRDO 81mm SGS,New FPA For IIR Seekers
 
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Karthi

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GRSE_from_India_holds_keel_laying_ceremony_of_2nd_Survey_Vessel_Large_Yard_3026_925_001.jpg



GRSE from India holds keel laying ceremony of 2nd Survey Vessel Large Yard 3026.

Garden Reach Shipbuilders and Engineers Ltd., (GRSE), Kolkata, laid the keel of the 2nd Survey Vessel (Large) (Yard 3026) at Kattupalli, Chennai. The Virtual Keel Laying ceremony was performed in the august presence of Vice Admiral Vinay Badhwar AVSM, NM, Chief Hydrographer to the Govt. of India. The ceremony was also attended by Rear Admiral VK Saxena, IN (Retd), Chairman & Managing Director, GRSE, other Directors and other senior officials from the Indian Navy and the Shipyard.

The ship is part of the Survey Vessels (Large) project won by GRSE (Garden Reach Shipbuilders and Engineers) in a competitive bidding process on October 18 for an order value of Rs. 2435.15 crore. The 1st ship is to be constructed within 36 months from the contract signing date with a project completion time of 54 months. Part construction of this ship is being carried out at L&T Shipyard, Kattupalli. After launching, the ship will be shifted to GRSE, Kolkata for outfitting, trials, and delivery.

The vessel is 110m long with a deep displacement of 3300 Tons and can accommodate 231 personnel. The vessel is designed for a cruising speed of 16 knots with an in-house GRSE’s Hull Form Design which imparts a superior level of operational efficiency. The Hull form of these new generations Survey Vessel also meets the stringent seakeeping and maneuvering requirements including Helicopter Operations at high sea states. The design of the ship by GRSE’s in-house Design Unit accorded “Centre of Excellence” Unit status by Council of Scientific & Industrial Research (CSIR), Ministry of Science & Technology is a significant step in the “Make in India” initiative of the Govt. of India. With their State-of-the-Art “Survey Payload” comprising of Autonomous Underwater Vehicles (AUVs), Remote Operated Vehicles (ROVs), Multi-Beam Echo Sounders etc, these Survey Ships would prove to be a game-changer in the Indian Navy’s Capabilities for Coastal and Deepwater Hydrographic Surveys aiding Maritime Operations. In their auxiliary role, they will be capable of performing limited search and rescue, limited ocean research, and operate as hospital ship/ casualty holding ships.

GRSE continues to be the epitome of indigenous design and construction of warships. Recently, following the call for “Atmanirbharta”, a state-of-the-art Modern Hull Block Complex and Indigenous Underwater CNC Plasma Cutting Facility were virtually inaugurated by the Hon’ble Raksha Mantri Shri. Rajnath Singh at the RBD Unit of GRSE, to augment the existing infrastructure at the Main Unit of the Shipyard. GRSE’s strategies revolve around shifting to smart manufacturing or Industry 4.0 with innovations in Automation, Robotics, and the Industrial Internet of Things.

GRSE presently has a strong order book of over Rs 26,000 crores and is currently executing three major shipbuilding projects, namely the P17A Project for 3 Advanced Stealth Frigates, 4 Survey Vessels (Large) and 8 Anti-Submarine Warfare Shallow Water Crafts. The 1st P17A Ship is expected to be launched in Dec this year, well ahead of schedule. GRSE delivered the Fast Patrol Vessel (FPV) ICGS Kanaklata Barua, the 105th Warship delivered by the Shipyard, to the Indian Coast Guard in June 2020, despite challenges in operations in a manpower-intensive industry during pandemic times thus reaffirming our motto “Infinite Passion meets Unwavering Commitment”. The Shipyard also plans to deliver two more warships in the coming months.
 

SUPERPOWER

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Navy Week Special.. enjoy this beautiful video Wonderful video of INS Vikramaditya to give us a virtual tour. Released today by the Navy as part of their navy week which starts today and ends on 4th December. If you're interested, watch it.... *Pan tilt and move your phone as the video plays to get the 360° VR tour*. See this on TV or laptop and rotate the video. You will be awestruck
 

WolfPack86

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INDIAN NAVY WANTS TO JOIN IAF IN FIGHTER JET SHOPPING
Decision follows indigenous development proposal by Defence Research and Development Organisation


The Navy is looking to combine its multi-role carrier-based fighter jet procurement tender along with the IAF tender for 114 fighters that is under way. The development comes following a decision to cut down the numbers to be procured following the indigenous development proposal by the Defence Research and Development Organisation (DRDO).

“We have the MiG-29K operating from the Vikramaditya and will operate from the Indigenous Aircraft Carrier (IAC)-I. To replace them, we have taken up a case for the Multi-Role Carrier Borne Fighters (MRCBF) which we are trying to do along with the IAF,” Navy Chief Admiral Karambir Singh said last week without elaborating. “The Navy has approached the IAF and we are awaiting their response,” another Navy official said on condition of anonymity.

On the Navy’s fighter procurement plans, Adm. Singh said the new development has been the Twin Engine Carrier Based Deck Fighter (TEBDF) which the DRDO and the Aeronautical Development Agency (ADA) have offered. He said they are working together to make sure that happens. It then “will have an indigenous deck based fighter for the Navy”.

Adm. Singh said many lessons have been learn from the Naval TEJAS MK-1 program like the arrestor hook and under carriage and so on and more lessons are being learnt through the Shore-Based Test Facility (SBTF) in Goa. “My hope is that the TBDRF would be able to enter service sometime in the early 2030s.”

Cutting Down Numbers

In 2017, the Navy has floated a Request For Information (RFI) to global fighter manufacturers and the response is being evaluated. However, with the new jet under development and also factoring in budgetary constraints, the Navy is in the process of cutting down the number of fighters from 57 to around 36. The final decision is awaited.

To further optimise the process, it is now looking to combine it with the IAF. However, it has to be seen how this is taken forward as the IAF RFI was open to both single and twin-engine fighters while the Navy has a stated requirement for a twin-engine jet to operate off its carriers.

The Navy has 45 Russian MiG-29K and it had said earlier there will not be enough aircraft to operate from both carriers. The response to the RFI from Boeing with its F-18 Super Hornet and Dassault Aviation with its Rafale jets are being evaluated. Both companies had said their jets can operate off the ski-jump of the Vikramaditya and in future the IAC-I Vikrant.

In fact, a Navy team was to visit the US Naval Air Station in Maryland early this year to witness a demonstration from Boeing on the compatibility of its F-18 Super Hornet to take off and land from the decks of Indian carriers. However, the visit was deferred due to the pandemic.
 

Narasimh

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Only the Indian Navy is adopting this Digital Camo Pattern. Army is going for a multicam variant, no DCP. IAF has introduced its own Digital Camo Pattern for the Garuds which is not at all common with this Navy camo.
I don't see any commonality. Moreover, I don't see why Navy crews even need disruptive camouflage? They go to combat in a boat. Said boat does not have this camo pattern. Maybe in littoral environments it makes some sense to have this on a boat, but the Navy isn't using it there either. In a rubber dinghy or RHIB, a VBSS squad might make use of it, but again, it should be fire retardant for that role, which it is not.




Meanwhile, this is how the US Navy thinks of its current camo uniform (its hilarious):
looks like the USN was concerned with cloth material not being fire retardant rather than camo design. Is the new IN uniform made of same material?
 

WolfPack86

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NAVY MAY TAKE LIGHT UTILITY HELICOPTERS ON LEASE
Vendors have been approached by the Navy to know if choppers would be available on short-term lease


NEW DELHI: After maritime surveillance drones, the Navy is considering taking light utility helicopters on lease to plug a vital capability gap in frontline warships. The plan is to use the newly instituted lease option in the procurement policy as a make-shift arrangement as a program to manufacture naval utility helicopters in India under the strategic partnership model is still lingering.

Sources said that foreign vendors have been approached by the Navy to understand if such choppers – typically used to transport supplies and personnel between ships with a secondary surveillance role – would be available for short term lease.

The Navy is looking to lease 12-18 choppers on an urgent basis where the maintenance would be done by the vendor but the helicopters would be operated by a service crew. While formal tenders to initiate the process are yet to be issued, the Navy is looking at a four-year lease to meet immediate needs.

There is an acute shortage of such helicopters in the Navy that had been relying on its ageing fleet of Chetak choppers for a ship borne role. With the indigenous Advanced Light Helicopters (ALH) unable to operate from smaller vessels due to their size, frontline warships being commissioned suffer a distinct capability gap.

Sources said that plans as of now are to take just the choppers on lease, which would later be retrofitted with light weapons by the Navy, as per its requirement. The choppers are likely to be armed only with a machine gun during the lease period.

The Navy has been pursuing a Rs 21,000 crore Make in India contract to acquire Naval Utility Helicopters (NUH) but the program has been delayed after complications over the entry of public sector unit Hindustan Aeronautics Ltd (HAL).



While the Navy is not in favour of HALs inclusion, arguing that there is a dire need to establish alternative capability in the private sector to manufacture modern aircraft, HAL has been pushing the case for an naval version of the Advanced Light Helicopter (ALH).

The navy is already operating the ALH in a utility role but requires 111 helicopters for deployment onboard ships to carry out multiple roles, including surveillance and ferrying supplies. The requirement is urgent and a specialised chopper is needed that can be quickly deployed and retrieved and can be stored in the space constrained hangar onboard all vessels.

The process to acquire the choppers is already in advanced stages with four Indian companies shortlisted who can partner with a foreign technology provider to make the helicopters domestically.
 

Rassil Krishnan

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NAVY COULD TAKE MINESWEEPER VESSELS & HELICOPTERS ON LEASE
New Delhi: The Navy is looking at leasing an unspecified number of mine counter measure vessels (MCMVs) and naval utility helicopters (NUHs) to fill a critical gap even as it pursues a larger contract for such systems to be made in India with foreign collaboration.


The Navy, which has taken on lease two Sea Guardian drones from a US firm besides a logistics ship from an Indian private firm for travel between Kochi and Lakshadweep, is looking at leasing certain equipment, sources in the defence and security establishment said.

It took two months from the movement of the file for the drones to arrive in India.

The drones were leased while India pursues a larger tri-service procurement of 30 lethal Predator drones from the US.

Talking about future leasing plans, a Navy source said, “We have sought information for possible lease of MCMVs. We are actively looking at getting them.”

The source added that the force is looking at the option of leasing equipment wherever there is a capability gap and the time to overcome it takes longer than what is convenient.

“The leasing is not just for training and familiarisation process. There are certain areas where there is a huge capability gap. While the larger procurement process is on to fill the gaps, leasing of such equipment can be used in the interim period,” the source said.

Giving the example of MCMVs that are used to clear harbours and other critical areas of mines laid by enemy submarines and vessels, the source said countries like Russia, South Korea and even the US have such equipment which can be taken on lease.

At one point, the Navy had 12 of them, but now have zero now and are dependent on kits fitted on smaller ships to counter the threat.

The Navy has been unsuccessfully trying to procure these vessels since 2005. Attempts to procure MCMVs from South Korea’s Kangnam Corporation failed after the company was hit with controversy twice, ultimately leading to the cancellation of the project.

The first controversy broke during the UPA government when allegations that the firm had appointed ‘consultants’ for the contract, in a violation of Indian procurement rules, surfaced. The firm came back into the picture a second time when Manohar Parrikar was defence minister. It was shortlisted to tie up with Goa Shipyard Ltd (GSL) for the contract.

However, when Nirmala Sithraman became defence minister, she cancelled the contract after the company failed to commit fully on Transfer of Technology (ToT).

Other Lease Plans

Sources said NUHs could also be taken on lease under the Strategic Partnership (SP).

Addressing his annual press conference Thursday, Navy chief Admiral Karambir Singh had indicated the force is not looking at the NUHs being offered by state-run Hindustan Aeronautics Limited.

Replying to a query, Admiral Singh said the NUHs are being pursued under SP, which is aimed at providing an impetus to private defence players.

The Navy, which was in talks with HAL over the helicopter deal worth USD 3 billion, is no longer keen on acquiring the aircraft.

Navy Firm On Third Aircraft Carrier

Admiral Singh has strongly come out in support of a third aircraft carrier, saying it is needed as the Indian economy grows towards the USD 5 trillion goal.

He said the Navy will formally move the proposal to the government for a third aircraft carrier after gathering the technical information sought from various countries.

“As the Navy, we are absolutely clear of the utility of the carrier. This is because air operations are integral to naval operations, and air power at sea is required since the Navy is all about reach and sustenance,” he said.

He added: “If you are a nation that is aspiration and you want to become a USD 5 trillion economy shortly and you want to do well, you will have to go outwards and seek the world. The nation does not want to be navy tethered to shore. For that aircraft carriers are absolutely necessary.”

In February the Navy is firm on its plans for a third aircraft carrier despite Chief of Defence Staff (CDS) General Bipin Rawat’s scepticism. The Indian Navy currently operates aircraft carrier INS Vikramaditya, while INS Vikrant is under construction in Cochin and is due for commissioning in 2022.

Both vessels have a displacement (measure of a vessel’s weight) of 45,000 tonnes each and the Navy is keen on a third vessel of higher displacement.
IT CANT BE US NAVY'S MINESWEEPERS AS THE US NAVY'S CURRENT MINESWEEPERS ARE AGING TO ALMOST RETIREMENT AND THEIR PROPOSED REPLACEMENT THE LCS WHICH WAS CONCEPTUALIZED AS A MULTI PURPOSE SHIP WITH ONE OF ITS TASK AS MINESWEEPING HAS BEEN A COLOSSAL DUD AND WASTE OF OPPORTUNITY .DONT BELIEVE ME LOOK AT THE NEWS REGARDING THE MINESWEEPING VESSELS IN THE US NAVY.

READ ABOUT THE SHIPS LEFT AND THE ONES TO BE INDUCTED IN THIS ROLE IN THE FUTURE.THE US NAVY NEEDS WORKHORSE SHIPS ITSELF IN FILLING ITS MINESWEEPING DUTIES ,SO HOW WILL IT HAVE LEEWAY TO LEASE US THEIR SHIPS.
 

Haldilal

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Ya'll Nibbiars Operation Cactus November 1998-hijacked ship 'progress light', having Maldivian VIPs as hostage, being persuaded to stop by small calibre naval gunfire.
EooqBAcVEAEtDD7.jpeg
 

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