Indian Army SIG Sauer 716 assault rifle.

vampyrbladez

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@1:15 the reporter says the second 72K batch has been ordered but I'm not sure if that's true @Gessler


+ the rifle really doesn't look too unwieldy in service, it just looks off because of the long hand guard, if there was some light, pistol grip and sights fitted it would look well proportioned
Second batch of 72,000 Sig 716i has been ordered.

According to Colonel Aman Anand, Army spokesperson, all infantry battalions deployed at key locations have got this weapon while in other infantry, 50 per cent of troops have it.
Approximately 1 lakh 44 Sig Sauer rifles have been given to Indian troops, government sources said.
https://www.google.com/amp/s/www.an...fles-from-indian-soldiers20210313224642?amp=1

The army recently procured 72,500 Sig Sauer assault rifles from the US, and the Centre has ordered a second batch of 72,500.
https://www.google.com/amp/s/www.th...eli-borne-operations/article34067221.ece/amp/
 

WolfPack86

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Army to equip all infantry battalions, not just frontline troops, with US Sig Sauer rifles
Chaubatia (Uttarakhand): With the much awaited deal for AK 203 getting delayed, the Army is equipping its over 400 infantry battalions with the American Sig Sauer assault rifles, procured under fast-tracked process (FTP), as against the original plan to arm only its frontline troops with the latest weapon.

The Army had initially bought the Sig 716 G2 Patrol assault/battlefield rifles, chambered for the 7.62×51 mm rounds, in 2019 under FTP for frontline soldiers — posted at the borders and involved in counter-terrorism and counter-insurgency operations.

However, all infantry battalions are now getting equipped with the American rifles, sources in the defence establishment said.

This will replace some of the obsolete Indian Small Arms System (INSAS) 5.56×45 mm rifles in use for over two decades.

According to the plan, at least two companies (about 100 soldiers each) in all the infantry battalions are being given the Sig 716 — irrespective of whether they are in the field or at peace stations.

The quantity will, however, differ with some of the battalions getting more weapons and the others.

Each infantry battalion of the Army has four companies, commonly referred to as the Alfa, Bravo, Charlie and Delta companies.

However, certain battalions have their own unique names. For example, 1 Mahar as the Whiskey, X Ray, Yankee and Zulu company. 13 Kumaon does not have a Charlie company but is called Rezang La company in honour of the fallen soldiers of C company.

ThePrint had in December 2020 reported that while the initial lot of the modern assault rifles from the US was sent to those guarding the Line of Control with Pakistan and for counter-terrorism operations in Kashmir, troops at the LAC in the northern sector in Ladakh are also being equipped with it now.

In December, the Defence Acquisition Council had accorded approval for the procurement of additional 72,400 Sig 716 rifles for approximately Rs 780 crore. This was also done under FTP and is part of the option clause of the original deal signed in 2019.

Shoot to kill
The Sig 716 rifles are more accurate and lethal than the INSAS because it has a higher caliber — 7.62 mm as against 5.56 mm.

It was in the 1980s that the Indian Army sought a lighter assault rifle chambered to fire the 5.56×45 mm cartridge. It was meant to provide relief to the Indian soldiers who fought the Siachen battle and the LTTE in Sri Lanka with the 5.1 kg Ishapore 7.62×51 mm rifle, but the INSAS has faced constant issues since its introduction in 1998.

At that time, the Army’s logic was that the rifle should injure an enemy soldier. This meant at least 2-3 other soldiers will be required to take away the injured soldier. However, with warfare tactics changing and the Army getting involved in counter-terrorism and counter-insurgency operations too, the force wanted a high caliber weapon that is a “shoot to kill system”.

SiG 716 an instant hit with soldiers
Weighing just 3.82 kg without the magazine, the American rifles were welcomed by the infantry soldiers that ThePrint spoke to.

They explained the rifle has an effective kill range of 600 metres and with greater accuracy than that of the INSAS.

With corking from behind than the side, which is the case in most of the small arms, the rifle becomes ambidextrous.

Even though the butt of the rifle is not collapsible, it comes with six adjustable positions, and hence comes handy in operations.

While the 2019 order for the Sig rifles included a limited set of ammunition, the Army is now using the Ordnance Factory Board rounds meant for the SLR rifles of the late 1980s.

“The Sig 716 is good for operations at the border and also in CI/CT. With a shorter barrel than that of the INSAS, it is good for room intervention operation and for urban warfare,” an officer explained.

AK 203 to be the mainstay of Army
The formal process to replace the INSAS began over a decade ago, but never saw the light of the day. Among the many reasons was the fact that the Army changed specifications for the replacement twice.

It first wanted a dual-caliber rifle which could shoot two types of cartridges — the AK-47 bullet and the INSAS bullet, much to the dismay of every small arms manufacturer in the world. The Army eventually scrapped the process and then demanded a modified INSAS.

However, in 2018, India and Russia announced a deal to jointly manufacture the AK 103, which was then upgraded to AK 203.

On 3 March 2019, Prime Minister Narendra Modi inaugurated an Indo-Russian joint venture, under which AK-203 will be manufactured at the Korwa Ordnance Factory in Uttar Pradesh’s Amethi district.

However, cost negotiations for the over 6 lakh rifles got stuck. This forces the Army to go in for emergency procurement of the SiG 716 rifles in 2019 and again in 2020.

Under the deal, the first 20,000 AK 203 rifles, which will be the mainstay of the armed forces for years to come, will be imported from Russia at a cost of about $1,100 (or Rs 80,000) a piece, depending on the conversion rate.
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Jaymax61

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The INSAS has horrible build quality. Given the huge number of rivets.
Have some one like Punj Llyod hire a design engineer from the west and build a new AR /HK/Sig inspired design for a gas operated 7.62. Design rights will be with India and with pvt manufacturing we ll have a control on production quality. There are literally hundred of design engineers in the west who can design a decent rifle in months. Instead we use the same beaten path and pay through our nose.
 

vampyrbladez

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Have some one like Punj Llyod hire a design engineer from the west and build a new AR /HK/Sig inspired design for a gas operated 7.62. Design rights will be with India and with pvt manufacturing we ll have a control on production quality. There are literally hundred of design engineers in the west who can design a decent rifle in months. Instead we use the same beaten path and pay through our nose.
This is exactly what UAE did with Caracal.

http://www.sadefensejournal.com/wp/the-caracal-car816-the-new-desert-assault-rifle/

Now thay are directly competing with H&K , Dasan Machineries, Sig Sauer, CZ, etc.
 

WolfPack86

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Indian army replaces Insas with Sig Sauer assault rifles
The army has begun replacing its Indian small arms system (Insas) rifles with American Sig Sauer assault rifles, procured recently under fast-track procedures.

These American-made rifles are easier to handle and offer better accuracy and a longer range — 600 metres compared with the Insas rifle’s 400 metres — sources said.

Officials said the army was supplying the Sig Sauer to its infantry battalions, particularly troops involved in counter-terrorism operations and those on the frontiers with Pakistan and China.


“Frontline troops along with soldiers in other infantry commands are being equipped with the newly procured rifles to boost their capability. Several units have started firing practice with the latest weapon,” an army official said.

The army recently procured 72,500 Sig Sauer assault rifles from the US, and the Centre has ordered a second batch of 72,500.

Indian soldiers have for over two decades mainly used Insas rifles made by the Ordnance Factory Board, amid complaints that they jammed frequently. Another shortcoming was that the Insas rifle’s 5.56mm bullet did not always kill the target in one shot.

The Sig Sauer bullet is bigger at 7.26mm. “The Sig Sauer has an effective killing range of 600 metres against around 400 metres for the Insas,” the army official said.

“Another advantage is that the Sig Sauer is more accurate and lethal because it has a higher calibre than the Insas.”
 

Wisemarko

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If you like build quality of civilian and cheaper 716i, you should really checkout SIG Patrol G2.
Although one cannot go wrong with any SIG, it is likely that decision to favor civilian market focused 716i over pure military/LE G2 is cost. G2 is over $1800 plus all the bells and whistles compared to $1100 or so for 716i.

The cost is high also because short stroke piston models are usually more expensive over DI models.

Hope India adopts entire SIG lineup for 5.56 and sidearm. I would love to see SIGs made in India!
 

samsaptaka

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Why would you in the world of self loading rifles and 30round box magazines still stab a person in close range when you can shoot him with a bullet which flies at 3000ft/sec?
And even if you come up with the excuse of your gun jamming... Your sidearm is there for that reason.
A bayonet is an outdated weapon and it's use is of a foregone era. It doesn't matter how many family members you have in the service, unless they've experienced an actual CQC situation much less a bayonet charge their opinions are still invalid. The purpose of the bayonet was never to inflict casualties, it was supposed to be used for psychological shock and cause mass routing of the enemy by a force that could close the gap. This concept has become obsolete today considering the prominence of urban warfare, the rapidness and speed of modern combat, the advancement in information collection and networking technology and tactics, improved small arms designs and optics etc. Plus the battlefield isn't going to wait for an entire section to affix bayonets.

Even if we were to gloss all over that, the bayonet training we teach is practically useless in combat and rather centered around building a soldier's psychology rather than realistic training. The time spent training a soldier in something you can bet he'll never use in his life could have spent in far more valuable and productive skills like advanced weapons handling, small unit tactics, small arms technical education or even actual realistic hand to hand training which isn't a step by step process.

Overall it needs to be done away with, there are far better ways to build a killer instinct in a soldier, which itself is incompatible with modern warfighting. Indian soldiers struggle as it is to handle their weapons and maneuver on the battlefield, we do not have the luxury to waste time and resources in antiquated weapons and tactics.
Every last weapon counts when you are fighting for your life. Easy for arm chair generals to say 'bayonets are old fashioned'. When you are down to your last bullet in your foxhole or defending a mountain top, you sure as hell would use your bayonet to make a last stand. Agreed that training tactics can be refined, but if you do away with the bayonet then you should atleast replace it with combat knife and its associated cqb training etc...
 

Fire and groove

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Every last weapon counts when you are fighting for your life. Easy for arm chair generals to say 'bayonets are old fashioned'. When you are down to your last bullet in your foxhole or defending a mountain top, you sure as hell would use your bayonet to make a last stand. Agreed that training tactics can be refined, but if you do away with the bayonet then you should atleast replace it with combat knife and its associated cqb training etc...
When I'm running out of ammunition, I'm exfiltrating off the battlefield to fight another day or worst comes to worst using my knife with my hands, because I planned my logistics, my retreating point and I stored enough ammunition. You don't need training to learn how to use a knife, pointy end goes into the enemy rinse and repeat, it's literally the greatest advantage of using a knife. Don't confuse movie logic for tactical reasoning, a soldier out of ammunition is pretty much combat ineffective on the battlefield. Bravado and a bayonet doesn't help when the enemy sits at standoff distance (which they can and will). If you think the Chinese will charge you straight up a mountain top to close the distance today you're very mistaken.
EVEN THEN, If their support-by-fire doesn't gun you down, their assaulting men (with loaded rifles and grenades) pulling security will as his mate forces you out with a grenade into your foxhole or bunker. This isn't 1962, please don't make the assumption that we're gonna run out of ammunition that easily or that the Chinese are gonna throw themselves at our bunkers again.
Like I said before, the excessive time spent training a soldier to use a bayonet can be spent teaching far more important things for combat. We don't teach our jawans sub-section tactics but apparently bayonet training takes priority.
 

Killbot

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When I'm running out of ammunition, I'm exfiltrating off the battlefield to fight another day or worst comes to worst using my knife with my hands, because I planned my logistics, my retreating point and I stored enough ammunition. You don't need training to learn how to use a knife, pointy end goes into the enemy rinse and repeat, it's literally the greatest advantage of using a knife. Don't confuse movie logic for tactical reasoning, a soldier out of ammunition is pretty much combat ineffective on the battlefield. Bravado and a bayonet doesn't help when the enemy sits at standoff distance (which they can and will). If you think the Chinese will charge you straight up a mountain top to close the distance today you're very mistaken.
EVEN THEN, If their support-by-fire doesn't gun you down, their assaulting men (with loaded rifles and grenades) pulling security will as his mate forces you out with a grenade into your foxhole or bunker. This isn't 1962, please don't make the assumption that we're gonna run out of ammunition that easily or that the Chinese are gonna throw themselves at our bunkers again.
Like I said before, the excessive time spent training a soldier to use a bayonet can be spent teaching far more important things for combat. We don't teach our jawans sub-section tactics but apparently bayonet training takes priority.
Ammo can be airdropped. You want soldiers to learn how to restrain and capture enemy combatants. Jiu Jitsu is the way to go.
 

Gessler

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Can't wait to see Garuds replace their 5.56 STAR-21 with SIG716s as Marksman rifle. The 716 with a VFG, Bipod & Mepro X6 magnifier would look killer. .308 round on AR-10 platform would finally do justice to 6x magnification.

Air Force & Navy also received few thousand 716s so its just a matter of time before we see that combo.

How much longer do I have to wait to see Garud 716s in a similar configuration as the Brit L129A1?



All the pieces are there, just put them together FFS !!! :shoot:
 

Emperor Kalki

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Are our soldiers also properly trained for using the bolt release?
Now this might sound like a dumb question, but I have seen some videos of SF firing their tavors and all, and when it comes to reloading I have only seen them using the charging handle to chamber the new round and never the bolt release. Or is it just that they prefer to do it that way or is there any specific reason?
Can anybody give a sure answer?
 

Hariharan_kalarikkal

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Are our soldiers also properly trained for using the bolt release?
Now this might sound like a dumb question, but I have seen some videos of SF firing their tavors and all, and when it comes to reloading I have only seen them using the charging handle to chamber the new round and never the bolt release. Or is it just that they prefer to do it that way or is there any specific reason?
Can anybody give a sure answer?
There was a video of a Sikh soldier using bolt release during previous yudh abhyas(on an m4a1), also one where the soldiers were being briefed on the bolt release by an US army soldier, although I cannot be sure on SF, if my memory serves right I have seen an instance on Maj Aryas show where an SF operative using bolt release, I cannot be sure lemme go do some digging
 

FalconSlayers

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Are our soldiers also properly trained for using the bolt release?
Now this might sound like a dumb question, but I have seen some videos of SF firing their tavors and all, and when it comes to reloading I have only seen them using the charging handle to chamber the new round and never the bolt release. Or is it just that they prefer to do it that way or is there any specific reason?
Can anybody give a sure answer?
Those who have smoked half of Pakistan’s population with AK-47s will love to use the charging handle only.
 

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