Indian Army SIG Sauer 716 assault rifle.

ManhattanProject

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Do you have any of your family members in the army? If yes then ask about a Bayonet to them. A Bayonet is a bayonet.
Well for the Indian infantry that still carries 1960s equipment, bayonets will still make sense. And for the average indian infantry dude i guess having it doesnt really hurt.
 

vampyrbladez

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From JointEx DUSTLIK-II
View attachment 81741
The Uzbek troops did not bring any guns.

Uzbeki : Bhai pen bhool gaya exam ke liye. Ek dena...

Bharatiya : Bhai mere sare pens Trimax (Sig 716i) hai , tu Ball Pen (INSAS) se likh le....

Uzbeki : Haat BC. Isse accha pencil se likhunga...

:)
 

ezsasa

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Why would you in the world of self loading rifles and 30round box magazines still stab a person in close range when you can shoot him with a bullet which flies at 3000ft/sec?
And even if you come up with the excuse of your gun jamming... Your sidearm is there for that reason.
Have any of the major armies officially discarded bayonets? I don’t think there are many.

Bayonet continues to be the last resort.

As far as Indian army is concerned, since mountain warfare is a critical element and supply lines on mountains are not guaranteed always, bayonet will continue to be part of the military tradecraft. there were enough instances during Kargil conflict where troops were down to their last bullet (ref: Col. Lalit rai speech) .

one military conflict in Asian tropics where western forces are involved, they’ll start singing songs on bayonets. perceptions change as per the recent memories.
 

abingdonboy

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Uzbek troops use US-made rifles during Exercise Dustlik with Indian Army
@1:15 the reporter says the second 72K batch has been ordered but I'm not sure if that's true @Gessler


+ the rifle really doesn't look too unwieldy in service, it just looks off because of the long hand guard, if there was some light, pistol grip and sights fitted it would look well proportioned
 

Gessler

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@1:15 the reporter says the second 72K batch has been ordered but I'm not sure if that's true @Gessler
Got DAC clearence, didn't hear anything about deal signing unless I missed/misremembered something (all these clearances, approvals & dose of desi patrakaar writing thoroughly confuse the status of most programs).

+ the rifle really doesn't look too unwieldy in service, it just looks off because of the long hand guard, if there was some light, pistol grip and sights fitted it would look well proportioned
And that long handguard is a good thing - when you're firing from behind cover, you'd rather rest the free-floating handguard on the cover than resting the barrel, which would hurt your zero and make the rifle less and less accurate over time.

[/QUOTE]
 

Fire and groove

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Do you have any of your family members in the army? If yes then ask about a Bayonet to them. A Bayonet is a bayonet.
A bayonet is an outdated weapon and it's use is of a foregone era. It doesn't matter how many family members you have in the service, unless they've experienced an actual CQC situation much less a bayonet charge their opinions are still invalid. The purpose of the bayonet was never to inflict casualties, it was supposed to be used for psychological shock and cause mass routing of the enemy by a force that could close the gap. This concept has become obsolete today considering the prominence of urban warfare, the rapidness and speed of modern combat, the advancement in information collection and networking technology and tactics, improved small arms designs and optics etc. Plus the battlefield isn't going to wait for an entire section to affix bayonets.

Even if we were to gloss all over that, the bayonet training we teach is practically useless in combat and rather centered around building a soldier's psychology rather than realistic training. The time spent training a soldier in something you can bet he'll never use in his life could have spent in far more valuable and productive skills like advanced weapons handling, small unit tactics, small arms technical education or even actual realistic hand to hand training which isn't a step by step process.

Overall it needs to be done away with, there are far better ways to build a killer instinct in a soldier, which itself is incompatible with modern warfighting. Indian soldiers struggle as it is to handle their weapons and maneuver on the battlefield, we do not have the luxury to waste time and resources in antiquated weapons and tactics.
 

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