China Economy: News & Discussion

Blademaster

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Well Elon is making another bad bet by ditching India and chasing China in a mirage type of way. India will not be so accommodating the next time Elon comes knocking on the door. Indian companies will fill the void and GoI will make sure to block any Chinese EVs from making footholds in the Indian market. GoI should unilaterally raise tariffs on all Chinese goods by 100-200% and force Indian companies to buy wares elsewhere or make those products in India.
 

Azaad

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The last time China dominated world trade it resulted in UK exporting opium to China to correct the trade imbalance thanks to millions of Hanjian who collaborated with them & tens of millions of addicts to sustain that business resulting in the Opium Wars which culminated in the Qing Dynasty losing considerable territory & sovereignty over much of its empire inaugurating what's now known as the Century of Humiliation which incidentally was extended when the CCP took over lasting up until date.

Wonder what will happen this time around ?

 

MiG-29SMT

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Mexico, Chile and Brazil have hiked — and in some cases more than doubled — duties on steel products from China over the past several weeks. Colombia may be about to follow suit.


The levies may seem out of turn, given how the Asian superpower has entrenched itself in Latin America in recent years. China has become the biggest buyer of raw materials from the region and a major investor. At the same time, Latin America has given China another market to sell its goods as it faces stiff US and European tariffs. It’s sending nearly 10 million tons of steel a year, valued at $8.5 billion, to Latin America — a huge jump from a mere 80,500 tons in 2000, according to regional steel association Alacero.

Now, that relationship is being tested by a global turn toward protectionism, and a flood of Chinese imports that threatens to put Latin American steel producers out of business and risk a combined 1.4 million jobs.

“This is an important test of China’s interests and intentions,” said Margaret Myers, director of the Asia and Latin America Program at the Inter-American Dialogue. It’s also a “test of Latin American resolve in challenging what is a critical economic partner.”

Brazil will soon introduce a tariff-rate quota system to stop predatory pricing of imported alloy. While the official announcement didn’t mention China, last year’s 62% surge in Chinese shipments to 2.9 million tons is behind the measure, said people briefed on the matter.

“It’s a sign to the world that Brazil has rules — it’s not a no man’s land,” said Marco Polo de Mello Lopes, the head of industry association Aco Brasil, who held talks with the government for nine months before it announced the new rules.

Pushing back against China, however, can be fraught with risks — particularly for smaller export-driven economies that rely on Chinese demand for their raw material sales, from cherries to copper.

There are plenty of examples of Beijing suspending purchases and investments in reaction to what it sees as unfair and unilateral measures. There was a brief period during which China banned soybean products from Argentina in response to wide-ranging anti-dumping measures. Following the 2018 arrest of a Huawei executive in Vancouver, China blocked canola shipments from two Canadian companies.

China’s Ministry of Commerce didn’t reply to a request for comment on the recent tariffs imposed by Latin American nations.

Read More: How China Beat Out the US to Dominate South America

For the self-proclaimed leader of the Global South, there’s also a broader symbolic risk that comes with a potential united front against its exports.

“In some ways, these developing countries are the better bellwether of global trade sentiment towards China,” said Christopher Beddor, deputy China research director at Gavekal Dragonomics. “They suggest the protectionist walls against Chinese goods are going up in many disparate places, not just rich countries.”

Existential Crisis

Latin America’s trade relationship with China has, in many ways, also had a positive impact on the region.

Chile’s economy, for instance, has benefited greatly from sending raw materials to China and buying back processed or manufactured goods. The country’s free-trade strategy — including bilateral accords with China and the US — opened up huge markets for its grapes, wines, salmon, wood pulp and minerals, helping it become one of the region’s most prosperous nations.

But like other commodity export-driven economies, Chile has struggled to compete in downstream markets — such as turning raw lithium into battery components or iron ore into steel products.

For Brazil, having the world’s best deposits of iron ore isn’t enough to make its steel mills competitive with China, even as it’s developed some manufacturing capacity.

Take miner Vale SA, which extracts rich iron ore from the red earth of the Brazilian Amazon. Much of it is shipped 10,000 miles to the Chinese port of Qingdao and fed into any one of the country’s hundreds of massive steel mills. There it’s blasted and shaped into basic alloy products.

The problem is when some of that steel makes the return trip, it arrives to Brazilian manufacturers at a heavy discount to prices charged by local steel mills owned by Gerdau, CSN and ArcelorMittal.

In Colombia, where Chinese shipments are coming in at a 50% discount, steelmaker Paz del Río has asked the government to raise import tariffs and help it return to profitability, Chief Executive Officer Fabio Galán said in an interview last month. The influx of Chinese alloy is not only risking jobs but it has completely displaced imports from Brazil and Mexico, according to the company. In the year through April, 92% of steel wire imports came from China and Russia.

“The biggest risk is that steel becomes another go-to example for the argument that China is exporting its excess capacity,” said Beddor. “It’s especially an issue because steel might prompt developing countries to accept that narrative in a way they would not regarding, say, electric vehicles.”

At the same time, Chinese investors have also been a key partner for Latin American nations looking to take their commodity-driven economies further downstream. The country has become a big spender in Latin America and the Caribbean, investing $187.5 billion in between 2003 and 2022 in industries such as energy, transport and mining, according to a report from the Inter-American Dialogue.

Though Chinese spending in the region has slowed of late, investments have continued in key industries. Industrial and Commercial Bank of China has grown in Argentina. In Brazil, electric car juggernaut BYD Co. is building its first factory outside Asia, and is planning to announce another in Mexico by year-end. In Chile, BYD and Tsingshan are developing lithium cathode factories. Since 2005, China Development Bank and China-Export Import Bank have provided $136 billion in loan commitments to the region.

Read More: Giving Up China Is Hard, Even for Argentina’s Anarcho-Capitalist

With the recently imposed tariffs, Latin American nations may be betting that China is now so entrenched in the region that Beijing won’t engage in reprisals. President Xi Jinping is expected to make his first trip to South America in five years, for the APEC and G-20 leaders’ summits, putting renewed focus on relationships in the region.

In addition, while the amount of Chinese steel entering Latin America is significant for the region and harmful for local mills, it’s about 1% of the billion metric tons that Chinese mills churn out each year. That may minimize the risk of irking Beijing.

“These countries potentially have more leverage than they have in the past because they are more critical as a destination for a lot of these goods,” said Myers. “That said, they’re still hugely dependent on China. So everybody’s going to be walking this fine line.”

‘Band-Aid’

For Latin America’s steel-making nations, the levies still aren’t a perfect solution.

For example, the new stiff tariffs in Chile will push up costs in the all-important mining industry that uses steel balls to grind down ore.

“There is a need to show a response to the dilemmas caused by economic globalization,” said Francisco Urdinez, director of Nucleo Milenio Iclac, a Chile-based think tank that studies Sino-Latin American relations. “But it’s not a fundamental solution. It’s just a band-aid that ends up generating redistribution from consumers to producers.”

Then of course, there’s the issue of steel dumping, the practice of selling the product for far less than local competitors. Raising tariffs won’t be enough to stop it in Brazil, said Humberto Barbato, who heads the nation’s electronics industry association, Abinee, a significant steel consumer. Instead, the government should prioritize the purchase of products with local content, he said. “The Chinese have a lot of flexibility to change the price.”

Though top Brazilian steelmaker Gerdau applauded the country’s new tariff-rate quota, CEO Gustavo Werneck warned it wouldn’t solve the long-term problem of competitiveness in the local industry such as the high cost of energy.

“China is going to make exports a major source of finance” for the country’s transition from industrialization to a more consumption-driven economy, Werneck told journalists at a press conference.

In all, Latin America’s steel protections are much more limited than the tariffs former President Donald Trump implemented during his administration. That only makes it more likely that China may simply try to defend the cases in the World Trade Organization, according to University of Queensland Associate Professor Scott Waldron.

“Any counter-measures will be limited,” said Beddor.

Already, he said, officials have “started to curb steel production, and that is likely to be the primary focus going forward, rather than how to retaliate against upset trade partners.”

--With assistance from Joe Deaux, Fabiola Zerpa, Simone Iglesias, Fran Wang, James Mayger and Jenni Marsh.

Most Read from Bloomberg Businessweek
 

rockdog

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Top auto exporters from China in first quarter 2024:

1. Chery
2. MG
3. BYD
4. Tesla
5. Geely
6. ChangAn
7. Haval
8. Baojun
9. Jetour
10. Kia

Kia is interesting because its presence in China's domestic market is small unlike Tesla (the other top foreign exporter.) So China is mostly an exporter hub for Kia.
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CEO of CATL.

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rockdog

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Adani Power’s Godda Plant Becomes Fully Operational

Ahmedabad, 27 July 2023:
Adani Power Jharkhand Limited (APJL), a wholly owned subsidiary of Adani Power Limited, part of the diversified Adani Group has achieved Commercial Operations Date of its second unit of its 2 X 800 MW Godda Ultra-supercritical thermal power plant ("Godda USCTPP") on 26th June, 2023, at Godda district in Jharkhand, India. The reliability run rest, including commercial operation tests of 2nd Unit of Godda power plant was completed on 25th June 2023 in the presence of BPDB and Power Grid Corporation of Bangladesh (PGCB) officials. Earlier this year, on April 6th, the first unit of the power plant, with 800 MW capacity, also achieved its COD. Power supply from Godda USCTPP to Bangladesh's grid will further enhance energy security in Bangladesh.



1.png



At 23:30 local time on June 25th, the second unit of the India Guda 2X800MW ultra supercritical coal-fired power plant project, which was EPC contracted by Shandong Electric Power Construction Third Company, successfully completed 14 days of reliable operation. All systems of the unit operated well, and all parameter indicators were excellent.
The Guda Project in India is one of the major energy cooperation projects between India and Bangladesh identified during the Prime Minister's visit to Bangladesh. It is India's first ultra supercritical thermal power plant. After the project is completed, it will provide power to Bangladesh through dedicated transmission lines, filling the electricity gap of about 170 million people in Bangladesh. At the same time, it will further promote the construction of the Bangladesh China India Myanmar Economic Corridor and promote regional capacity interconnection. This project is the seventh large-scale thermal power project undertaken by the company in India through EPC general contracting, and also the first large-scale power plant EPC project undertaken by a Chinese company in India since 2010. On April 5th, Unit 1 of the project successfully completed 14 days of reliable operation.
During the project construction process, the execution team unified their thinking, strengthened their confidence, and successfully completed the construction tasks of the two units in a safe, high-quality, and efficient manner. During the trial operation of the unit, the monitoring instrument input rate was 100%, the protection input rate was 100%, and the thermal control automatic input rate was 100%, which won the common recognition and unanimous praise of all parties, demonstrating the core advantages of the company's EPCO entire industry chain and the efficient construction organization ability of an international first-class EPC contractor.
 

SexyChineseLady

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Will the Han obey Master CCP or turn Hanjian for more renminbis?
Chinese firms do not have a choice in India :(

Indian government had crushed FDI from China so in 2024 it is down about 90% from 2021 and there are now less than 300 large and medium sized Chinese firms in India compared to 1000 before 2021. The trend is rapidly going even further downward.

Most of China's FDI is going to ASEAN, Mexico and Eastern Europe. The China-India investment environment is pretty sad right now :(

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MiG-29SMT

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At least you have learn to see the reality, but let me tell you someting recycling is not new, and that is not the main issue, recycling has existed in all human history, even nature recycle our mess, at slower speed though but it does, however the problem is economical.

Ask your self if BYD sells an electric car let us say in Mexico or Brazil do they recycle the car?

At least in Mexico I have not hear they do.

It is economical because when they sell you the car, the recycle expenses are not included if you research how many batteries are recycle you will find the true, very little is done in reality and CATL is not saying any thing new, the americans nd Germans have the technology too, however publicicly they say the recycle in reality very little is done because recycling costs.

1.1. American Battery Technology Company


Founded:
2011

Location: Reno, Nevada, United States
1.2. American Manganese Inc. (RecycLiCo Battery Materials Inc.)


Founded:
1987

Location: Surrey, British Columbia, Canada
1.3. Ecobat


Founded:
1994

Location: Dallas, Texas, United States

1.4. Ganfeng Lithium Group Co., Ltd.


Founded:
2000

Location: Xinyu, Jiangxi Province, China

1.5. LG Energy Solution Ltd.


Founded:
2020

Location: Seoul, South Korea

1.6. Li-Cycle Holdings Corp.


Founded:
2016

Location: Toronto, Ontario, Canada

1.7. Lithion Recycling Inc. (Lithion Technologies)


Founded:
2018

Location: Montreal, Québec, Canada
1.8. Redwood Materials, Inc.


Founded:
2017

Location: Carson City, Nevada, United States

1.9. Retriev Technologies, Inc. (Cirba Solutions)


Founded:
1984

Location: Ohio, United States

1.10. Umicore N.V.


Founded:
1989

Location: Brussels, Belgium







1. SNAM INDUSTRIES:
SNAM INDUSTRIES is an Indian-based company specializing in waste management and recycling services.
5. Semco Infratech Pvt. Ltd.:
Semco Infratech Pvt. Ltd. is an Indian-based company with a diverse portfolio



A Review of the Current Methods and Global Developments
Today, only 5% of the world’s lithium-ion batteries are thought to be recycled across the globe
, with dramatic environmental and financial implications for the projected 8 million tons of waste.

At ReLitio, we lead the responsible recycling of lithium batteries in Mexico. Our mission is to promote efficient and safe recycling, protecting the environment and reducing the carbon footprint. With advanced technology, we optimize our processes to generate a positive impact on the conservation of the planet and a sustainable future. Join our cause and be part of the change towards a cleaner and more responsible world. Recycle with us and make a difference!

that is what you have to see is the technology exists, nothing new by CATL even Relitio from Mexico can do it, and the main recycling companies of batteries are american however there are chinese companies of course, but the question is why only 5% costs mean in money and energy companies have to spend, and now consider EVs are not even popular in most of the world, most cars are regular cars with ICEs what are sold in the world.


Same applies to solar panels


Most solar plants are located in remote areas, so the logistics and transportation is expensive, and once dismantled there is hardly any money from each individual part,” says Srinivas Vedula from EPragathi, a Bengaluru-based e-waste recycling company. “Plus, the solar glass has no value.”

Mirza, who is the official contractor for Ayana Renewable Power’s plants across India’s solar parks, including in Pavagada, says he sells dismantled parts to traders but admits: “We don’t know what they do with it.”

Wooden pallets with discarded solar panels and waste wood piled around them

Stacks of broken solar panels at a site of Fusion Sprint Recycler. Photograph: Atif Mirza
Because authorised e-waste contractors are often unwilling to handle the waste in accordance with the CPCB protocol, a network of informal operators – who dismantle, aggregate, transport and recycle panels – have stepped in to fill the gap.

 
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rockdog

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Chinese firms do not have a choice in India :(

Indian government had crushed FDI from China so in 2024 it is down about 90% from 2021 and there are now less than 300 large and medium sized Chinese firms in India compared to 1000 before 2021. The trend is rapidly going even further downward.

Most of China's FDI is going to ASEAN, Mexico and Eastern Europe. The China-India investment environment is pretty sad right now :(

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BYD pick-up


 

rockdog

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In the first four months of 2024, China's exports of # Russia # passenger cars increased by 37% year-on-year, reaching 237000 units, with an export amount of 3.5 billion US dollars, a year-on-year increase of 27.5%. Statistics show that from January to April 2024, China exported 237100 passenger cars to Russia, an increase of 37% from 173700 vehicles in the same period last year. In January this year, China exported 54100 vehicles to Russia, 44800 vehicles in February, 58900 vehicles in March, and 79400 vehicles in April, the highest value since November 2023.
 

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