Idiotic Musings From Firangistan

Discussion in 'Members Corner' started by Dovah, Nov 5, 2013.

  1. James-bond

    James-bond Regular Member

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    Chatrapathi, Akak, aditya10r and 3 others like this.
  2. Sandeep0159

    Sandeep0159 Senior Member

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    This is indeed the British version of Blue Whale game....2500 points,lmfao:pound:
     
  3. Srinivas_K

    Srinivas_K Senior Member Senior Member

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    And these guys come to India with religious tolerance and other b.s.
     
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  4. dhananjay1

    dhananjay1 Senior Member Senior Member

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    Replies to her tweet .

     
  5. Dovah

    Dovah Untermensch Moderator

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    Threads merged.

    Also @james bond, stopping spamming these low-quality, hateful and agenda-driven posts.
     
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  6. indiatester

    indiatester Senior Member Senior Member

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    https://www.independent.co.uk/news/...ow-operating-under-sharia-rules-a6910131.html

    Five Whitehall buildings held by wealthy businessmen now operating under Sharia rules
    Properties leased on condition that they cannot host any activities not sanctioned by sharia


    [​IMG]
    Admiralty House is one of the five Whitehall building now operating under Sharia rules ( Wikipedia )

    The historic Admiralty House and four other Whitehall buildings are now operating in accordance with some sharia rules – including a ban on alcohol – after they were used as part of an Islamic bond scheme.

    The properties must comply with some aspects of sharia under the terms of special bonds known as sukuk, announced by George Osborne two years ago when the UK became the first Western country to issue them.


    At least £200m of the sukuk bonds have been sold to investors in the UK and the major Islamic finance centres in the Middle East and Asia.

    Under sharia, charging interest – or usury – is forbidden. So to allow Islamic investors to receive a return on their money, the sukuk bonds pay them rental income on certain buildings instead.

    As part of the deal, the Government agreed that the nominally rented buildings would abide by certain aspects of sharia rules, so Muslim investors did not feel they were making money out of something they regard as immoral, such as a pub.

    MailOnline reported that the buildings were “now governed by sharia law”. And Andrew Bridgen, the Conservative MP for North West Leicestershire, told the website: “I do find it unbelievable government buildings are governed by sharia law. I don’t see the bars as being an essential part of Parliament but it’s the principle that matters. Most of our constituents will be absolutely amazed that the principle could ever have been authorised.”

    However, a Treasury spokesperson said: “This is not news. As the Government set out clearly in 2014, three government buildings are being used to underpin the Government’s sukuk bond, Richmond House, 22-26 Whitehall and Wellington House. “The sukuk is issued under, and governed by, English law which applies at all times.”

    In 2014, the Government cited a number of organisations, including the Executive Shariah Committee of HSBC Saudi Arabia, as saying the bonds were “sharia compliant” but suggested potential investors should seek opinions from their chosen experts.

    It was unclear which other aspects of sharia are being adhered to by the managers of the buildings concerned, but a government source said it had been agreed that serving pork in Richmond House would not affect the sharia compliance of the sukuk. “Alcohol being served hasn’t arisen, as you would expect for a government building,” the insider added.

    In January, The Times reported that a plan to relocate MPs to Richmond House to allow refurbishment work at Westminster was meeting resistance because Richmond House was dry under the terms of the sukuk agreement.

    The sukuk bonds proved hugely popular – the £200m scheme was over-subscribed 10-fold. In 2014, Chancellor George Osborne expressed the hope that it would boost London’s standing as a global financial centre.
     
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  7. Indx TechStyle

    Indx TechStyle War Mongerer Veteran Member Senior Member

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    This article is two years old though.
    by dailyo.in.
    Britain's colonial India hangover is nauseating
    To underscore it all, local media will have a field day as William and Kate next week undertake their official visit to India.
    [​IMG]
    These past few months will, in time, be regarded as the moment when the Raj came home to roost here in Britain.

    Last November, this country witnessed the extraordinary spectacle of its prime minister giving a warm-up speech at Wembley Stadium to 60,000 UK citizens whose hearts were throbbing expectantly for the main act: the arrival on stage of Narendra Modi.

    For a British prime minister – a Conservative one at that – to enthusiastically greet this foreign leader and be so welcoming of how dearly British-Indians regard both him and India was a watershed event. Only David Cameron – one of the smartest politicians the UK has ever produced – would have the nous to do that, and do it without reaping the storm of criticism that one would expect from Britain's jingoistic press.

    And this week, the news here has been filled with two stories that even more starkly highlight the reversing relationship the British have with the people they once lorded over.

    Tata Steel's decision to pull out of the UK – with the possible loss of 40,000 jobs – has sparked a paroxysm of national anxiety. Watching Tata's European head, Koushik Chatterjee – with his desi accent and trademark Bengali side-parting – nonchalantly speak of Britain as a busted flush was a sight I never expected to see while growing up.

    To observe the British media and political class jittering as envoys were dispatched to Mumbai, wondering whether the Indians would be merciful, was to witness the moment when the British finally, with great anguish and humiliation, began their slow collective transition into reality and a post-imperial sense of themselves.

    The media here has already excitedly found a possible Indian saviour, the Punjabi magnate Sanjeev Gupta, who's shown an interest in buying the Tata plants – but he would want the sort of massive subsidies that the UK government could not give Tata, and would surely downsize the operations anyway.

    If it wasn't galling enough for the Brits to watch Indians pull the plug on their industrial base this week, and then haggle over the the leftovers, they also had to deal with a report on the British education system which revealed that Indian kids in the UK outperform white British ones by a staggering 50 per cent.

    While in the past some would have regarded such a statistic as proof of what an open society Britain is, a place where immigrants are accepted and their children able to thrive, the figures have this week been universally interpreted as a national crisis, proof that something is chronically wrong with Britain. Afterall, what is Britain coming to if the cards here aren't reliably stacked against the darkies?

    To be so comprehensively outsmarted by a people who arrived in the UK with nothing – no money, education or ability to speak English in many cases – is a difficult fact for the British to digest.

    There has been much talk of the systemic dysfunction of British schools – the same schools that Indian kids have no problem excelling in – and bizarre widespread allegations that somehow "standards have dropped", because brown kids can meet them while white ones can't.

    Indians overtaking Brits at school is only a microcosm of the wider reversal of fortunes the two peoples are experiencing in the world today. And global reality is something the British – a people who acquired a grossly inflated sense of themselves as they stumbled fortuitously into their very brief empire – find excruciating to comprehend now that colonial arrogance cannot pass muster anymore.

    The empire underlies the self-loathing that permeates British society. Left-wing Brits are disgusted that Britain had an empire, while right-wing ones are appalled that Britain lost one. In both cases, the legacy of the empire is a neurosis that delusionally places Britain at the centre of human history: as the country that's responsible for all that is either right or wrong with the world.

    The fact that the rest of mankind regards the British and their history as largely irrelevant is too painful to accept. For both the Left and the Right, their obsession with the empire – be it proud or shame-ridden – is merely a narcissistic fantasy with which to prop up their very shaky sense of national self-esteem.

    The Brits are obsessed with India in a way that Indians certainly aren't with them. Wodehouse-reading Anglophiles are an increasing rarity in India now, whose young and thrusting population look within themselves for inspiration, and to China and the USA when glancing for it abroad. But there's an embarrassing and tragic yearning for India in Britain these days – an India that's long gone, if it ever existed at all.

    The bookshops here are bursting with sentimental tomes about the Raj, while the dynamic ever-evolving actuality of modern-day India is largely ignored. And the television series Indian Summers is now into its second season: an abysmal piece of nostalgia about the last days of the empire. Shot in Malaysia, it bewildering portrays Shimla as steamy and tropical, not the chilly outpost the Brits chose precisely because it reminded them of home, and is full of pen-pushing babus conflicted by their desire for independence while admiring the merits of British civilisation, and sweaty gin-swilling Brits lusting after the natives while trying to reconcile the responsibilities of ruling them with the increasing realisation that the Indians are – lo and behold! – human beings just like themselves. Complete tosh.

    To underscore it all, William and Kate, the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge, will next week undertake their official visit to India, giving the British media endless colourful photo opportunities of their future king and queen reconnecting with the vast exotic land that, but for a tryst with destiny, they would have been crowned emperor and empress of.

    The Brits will be rapt before their TV screens, dreaming weepily of the alternate reality in which this would be the case. Indians will enjoy it too, of course, having the closest couple Britain has to Beyonce and Jay-Z amble admiringly about their country, advertising its wares to the world.

    This sort of mushy nonsense is staple fare in Britain. The BBC is constantly producing documentaries, all of them either desperately searching for some dim reflection of the British in India – in its railways, architecture or tea plantations – or following wide-eyed Brits, babbling in wonder as they take a whistle-stop tour of a lush and magical land that defies description. None of them tell the British public what it really needs to know: how to deal effectively with Indians.

    David Cameron, however, does seem to know. Unlike other minorities here, British-Indians are actively encouraged by his government to develop and deepen their relationship with their country of origin: Cameron's compering of the Wembley Modi-fest was all about that. The reason is, of course, the OCI status they are entitled to that gives them a massively privileged commercial position in India that no other British citizens have.

    Britain has an NRI population of 1.5 million – the biggest Indian population outside of India – and these people are a strategic national asset, with a ready access to the Indian market that the British government is shrewdly seeking to leverage. British-Indians are Britain's, and the European Union's, strongest foothold in India and the wider Asian economy.


    The irony of it all is that when British-Indians wake up – as, I think, the British government is nudging them to – and start regarding themselves as an extension of India rather than as a minority fitting quietly into Britain, their dual status will supercharge their already conspicuous success.

    The British would benefit greatly from this as a whole, but also be confronted with the reality that their former imperial subjects now enjoy an almost colonial position of power and privilege in their own country.

    This phenomenon will agonise the Brits. But they will console themselves, as ever, with schmaltzy historical-dramas or the works of William Dalrymple, plunging their heads into the sand as they delude themselves that they are – like some pining, long-forgotten party to a one-night stand with someone who was way out their league – the ones who uniquely understand India and matter most to her.
     
  8. Indx TechStyle

    Indx TechStyle War Mongerer Veteran Member Senior Member

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  9. Kshatriya87

    Kshatriya87 Senior Member Senior Member

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    .
    [​IMG]
    …………………………………………………………………...
     
  10. Kshatriya87

    Kshatriya87 Senior Member Senior Member

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    ‘Britain Would Collapse If It Tried to Pay Back the Money it Drained From India’
    Britain drained more than 9 trillion pounds from India over 173 years, says economist Utsa Patnaik.

    Britain would collapse if it tried to pay back the money it drained from India, eminent economist Utsa Patnaik said at a conference at Jawaharlal Nehru University, New Delhi on Wednesday.

    Delivering the inaugural lecture at the three-day Sam Moyo Memorial Conference on “Land and Labour Questions in the Global South”, Utsa Patnaik said that the estimated drain from India to Britain over the period from 1765 to 1938 was a whopping 9.184 trillion pounds, several times the size of the UK’s GDP today.

    Patnaik, who is Professor Emerita at the Centre for Economic Studies and Planning (CESP), JNU, said that the policies followed by Britain during its colonial rule in India were so disastrous that per capita food grains availability in India declined drastically from 197.3 kg per year in 1909-14 to 136.8 kg per year in 1946.

    This was because the system was strongly income-deflating (reducing the purchasing power of the people), which enabled the squeezing out of export goods from a poor population. The result was a fall in per capita food availability and declining nutritional intake.

    In India, just as also happened in many countries in the Caribbean, local producers were set to work to produce commodities – particularly primary commodities which the colonial powers could never produce themselves in their home countries. The colonial powers then proceeded to appropriate these commodities.

    In the Indian case, this appropriation took the form of getting Indian peasants and labourers to produce an enormous global export surplus which earned gold and foreign exchange. “But the whole of this global export surplus earnings disappeared into the account of the Secretary of State for India in London. Not a penny of it, of sterling or financial gold, was allowed to flow back to the colonised country. Then how did the producers get paid? Very clever. They got paid out of their own taxes!” said Patnaik.

    Surplus budgets were being operated systematically in British-ruled India for the best part of 200 years. “When you tax a population and you do not spend all the taxation within the country, but you set aside a third or more for purchasing export goods, the operation of such surplus budgets deflates mass incomes. It puts a tremendous squeeze on the peasantry.”

    “No country in the world today in the Global South has a per capita food availability as low as the level India had reached by the year 1946.”

    The amount of wealth drained out of India by Britain can be calculated by estimating the present value of the commodity export surplus - the estimate of 9.184 trillion pounds has been arrived at by calculating the present value at a relatively low 5 percent interest rate.

    Branko Milanovic talks about the ethics of global north to the global south. “He says Britain should return the money it drained from India. But the fact is that this is impossible. Britain would collapse; it does not have the capacity to pay even a fraction of what it drained over 200 years.”

    Income deflating policies have resulted in food availability in India declining

    The main form that the neo-imperialist policies of income deflation which are current today are taking is contractionary fiscal policy supported by a whole range of other measures to attack small and middle scale agricultural production.

    For example, the share of rural expenditure in capital expenditure by the centre and states combined has declined sharply since mid-1990s, as Praveen Jha has shown.

    The growth rates of public development expenditure by the centre and the states saw a very sharp contraction in the first half of the 1990s. That was when the structural adjustment and income-deflating programmes were coming in, in a very strong way under Dr. Manmohan Singh. It subsequently went up, but even as late as 2000-05, the growth rate was lower than it was during the 1980s. Then it shoots up from 2005-06 to 2010-11, because of the impact of the global economic crisis and the enormous rise in food prices. Again, in 2010-11 to 2014-15, when Chidambaram was the Finance Minister, he pulled back very sharply, and the growth rate of central expenditure again declined sharply. When you have this kind of income deflating policy, the people will be forced to cut back on their food expenditure and their nutritional standards will come down.

    In the pre-reform period, the food grain availability was rising, with fluctuations – it increased from about 452 grams per capita per day in 1972 to 494 grams per capita per day in 1990. But with the onset of neoliberal reforms, more land was diverted to grow export-oriented crops, and trade was liberalised, while fiscal compression reduced employment and incomes of the mass of the population. There was a withdrawal of government support for procurement at minimum prices. As a result of all these, there has been a steep decline in food availability in the recent decades – it stood at 447 grams per head per day in 2013.
     
  11. Indx TechStyle

    Indx TechStyle War Mongerer Veteran Member Senior Member

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    Holy Crap! British Artist Magnus Irvin Will Cast Your Anus In Bronze (NSFW)
    [​IMG]
    WTFARK VIA RIOT TV
    Magnus Irvin makes customized bronze anuses for $1,900 a pop.


    Chocolates casted in butthole!!
    :hail::hail::hail::hail:
     
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  12. Haldiram

    Haldiram Senior Member Senior Member

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    Britain banega Pakistan :troll:

     
  13. TejasMK3

    TejasMK3 Regular Member

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    These guys run propaganda campaigns against India for Child marriage and other nonsense while they go ahead and sexualize kids, In a few years they will say it's okay to be a pedophile... "sexual freedom", it is quite a common past time in those places already anyway. (Oh and child marriage actually legal in some states in the U.S)
     

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