Project- 75(I). Next gen subs. RFP issued

Dark Sorrow

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The software may have been developed using some US tool, but the software itself is french to avoid hack.
As all the civilian Boeing are developped using the french catia software, but they are american product.
I will say you are not from computer science background.

You don't actually write code. You draw models and functional implementation of these models. Software like Ansys SCADE and Matlab/Simulink generate code automatically for target hardware.

This generated code is the software deployed on every mission computer.

Software like catia are used in mechanical design. Once the design is fixed you can go without such software but you still need code to be deployed mission computer.

American licensing terms are infectious and this way the enforce ITAR along with semiconductors.

Just a tidbit Germans have stated stealing French clients.

Lockheed Martin Aeronautics to Use Siemens Xcelerator for All New Programs
 
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binayak95

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None of the diesel submarines impress me honestly. They look cool on paper and probably could claim a silent hit in exercises but in reality, they will never make a dent in outcome of a war. They can’t reach the operational area on time or without being detected. They can’t dive deep enough nor can ever outrun its predators. A billion dollar sitting duck. I don’t always do submarines but when I do, it’s SSN.
EH what? Diesel subs are best for shallow water, home water operations - not all navies need long ranged submarines to escort expeditionary forces. SSNs are inherently noisier than diesel electrics - not that the noise cannot be addressed but its inherently harder.

And dent in outcome of a war? Which war are you talking about that saw peer states fighting with nuke subs? Most cold war encounters and even modern day exercises see Diesel Electrics often trump SSNs.

For navies on a budget (and I'd argue even the USN) SSKs make a hell lot more sense.
 

binayak95

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Lets not things for granted.
We can take on PN and PAF is because of the combined effort of all branches of IN.
Their is no one single wonder weapon.
PN is arming itself to the teeth with some potent platform
  1. Hangor-class submarine
  2. Zulfiquar-class frigate
  3. Tughril-class frigate
  4. Sea Sultan ASW
  5. Jinnah-class frigate (in-future)
Submarines are one field where IN lacked traditionally.
If we have to keep our edge over PN we need to invest more on IN and acquire more cutting edge platforms.

Nothing in life is permanent except change.
And all of them are not worth the pier space they occupy, bleh.
 

MonaLazy

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Indian P76 submarines impeded by rudderless P75I programme
12th August 2022 - 02:40 GMT | by Neelam Mathews in Delhi
RSS

Naval Group is assisting India’s construction of six Scorpenes. They are years late, with two yet to be commissioned. (IN)

India wants to build submarines domestically, but its efforts are consequently beset by all sorts of difficulties and delays.


Last year’s RfP for six Project 75I conventional submarines for the Indian Navy (IN), rejected by OEMs for such reasons as its unlimited liability clause, will now get a corrigendum from the MoD that addresses their concerns.

The RfP deadline has been extended to 30 November, Shephard learned. Furthermore, a contract is unlikely to be awarded before 2024, when India’s elections will be held.

Of the 24 conventional submarines in the IN’s fleet plan, six were contracted to Naval Group under P75, six will be built under P75I, and 12 are to be built wholly in India as Project 76.

Naval Group was awarded the P75 contract for six Kalvari-class Scorpenes 17 years ago, and the type was supposedly involved in a data leak storm. However, the French company pulled out of P75I.

The OEM said it could not meet conditions related to the P75I’s air-independent propulsion (AIP) system. Yet in April, it offered to build two AIP-capable SSKs in Surabaya for the Indonesian Navy.

Meanwhile, Jose Maria Ridao, Spain’s Ambassador to India, recently said that Navantia would be ready to provide an AIP-equipped submarine.

Elsewhere, the Defence Research and Development Organisation said its land-based prototype AIP will be ready once the first Kalvari comes in for a refit in 2025.

‘This is not simple. It requires form, fit and space adjustment and lots of trials,’ said a navy engineer. Despite scepticism, retired commodore Anil Jai Singh, VP of the Indian Maritime Foundation, said, ‘This is completely doable.’

However, the IN’s indigenous design for a dozen Project 76 diesel-electric submarines is being impeded by P75I’s delays.

C.V Krishnan, a defence observer, said, ‘[Serious] work on it will start only after P75I, as some of the technology for P76 is to come from the P75I ... The IN wants proper technology transfer for one project.’

Krishnan added that if the P76 does get stuck, then the programme could seek an OEM consultant under a government-to-government agreement. No royalties would then need to be paid.

Sujeet Samaddar, founder of Peninsula Foundation, noted: ‘If a country can build and sail two nuclear subs, I don’t see a reason why it can’t make conventional subs, provided it has a fully autonomous framework, staffed by professionals.’


What is that tech from P75I that needs to go into P76? Li-Ion batteries?
 

Vamsi

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Indian P76 submarines impeded by rudderless P75I programme
12th August 2022 - 02:40 GMT | by Neelam Mathews in Delhi
RSS

Naval Group is assisting India’s construction of six Scorpenes. They are years late, with two yet to be commissioned. (IN)

India wants to build submarines domestically, but its efforts are consequently beset by all sorts of difficulties and delays.


Last year’s RfP for six Project 75I conventional submarines for the Indian Navy (IN), rejected by OEMs for such reasons as its unlimited liability clause, will now get a corrigendum from the MoD that addresses their concerns.

The RfP deadline has been extended to 30 November, Shephard learned. Furthermore, a contract is unlikely to be awarded before 2024, when India’s elections will be held.

Of the 24 conventional submarines in the IN’s fleet plan, six were contracted to Naval Group under P75, six will be built under P75I, and 12 are to be built wholly in India as Project 76.

Naval Group was awarded the P75 contract for six Kalvari-class Scorpenes 17 years ago, and the type was supposedly involved in a data leak storm. However, the French company pulled out of P75I.

The OEM said it could not meet conditions related to the P75I’s air-independent propulsion (AIP) system. Yet in April, it offered to build two AIP-capable SSKs in Surabaya for the Indonesian Navy.

Meanwhile, Jose Maria Ridao, Spain’s Ambassador to India, recently said that Navantia would be ready to provide an AIP-equipped submarine.

Elsewhere, the Defence Research and Development Organisation said its land-based prototype AIP will be ready once the first Kalvari comes in for a refit in 2025.

‘This is not simple. It requires form, fit and space adjustment and lots of trials,’ said a navy engineer. Despite scepticism, retired commodore Anil Jai Singh, VP of the Indian Maritime Foundation, said, ‘This is completely doable.’

However, the IN’s indigenous design for a dozen Project 76 diesel-electric submarines is being impeded by P75I’s delays.

C.V Krishnan, a defence observer, said, ‘[Serious] work on it will start only after P75I, as some of the technology for P76 is to come from the P75I ... The IN wants proper technology transfer for one project.’

Krishnan added that if the P76 does get stuck, then the programme could seek an OEM consultant under a government-to-government agreement. No royalties would then need to be paid.

Sujeet Samaddar, founder of Peninsula Foundation, noted: ‘If a country can build and sail two nuclear subs, I don’t see a reason why it can’t make conventional subs, provided it has a fully autonomous framework, staffed by professionals.’


What is that tech from P75I that needs to go into P76? Li-Ion batteries?
Why can't they build the 1st 6 boats of P-76 with the tech they recieved from Kalvari Class
 

MonaLazy

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Why can't they build the 1st 6 boats of P-76 with the tech they recieved from Kalvari Class
Not entirely sure, but I think we don't have Li-Ion battery tech- that & proven at-sea AIP are the two requirements of P75I.


Advantages of lithium-ion batteries

Relying on lithium-ion batteries as a replacement for the lead-acid batteries would negate the need for AIP, while improving the underwater endurance of a submarine. Lithium-ion batteries have inherent advantages over lead-acid batteries such as higher power density, lighter weight and lower maintenance costs given absence of need for gas charging or water filling.

US defence website The Drive explained the advantages of lithium-ion batteries in an article in 2017. Lithium-ion batteries "keep up their output even when their charge runs low, they are lighter than lead-acid batteries, they can be charged exceptionally fast... and they can store much more energy. Compared to the AIP system they aim to replace, endurance should be similar, while the overall boat’s propulsion system design will be less complex and bulky. Not just that, but lithium-ion batteries can provide large output on demand, allowing the boat to dash mush faster while dived..." The Drive reported.

In short, a submarine with lithium-ion batteries has greater underwater endurance and can run faster than a comparable ship that has lead-acid batteries.


LIB safety regulations
In terms of fire risk, LIBs are currently encountering serious fire safety concerns in a variety of industries, including the consumer electronics, automotive, aviation, and marine sectors.



New battery technologies
Current LIBs rely on two essential metals – cobalt and nickel – that harm the people who mine them, as well as the environment. IBM has recently developed a new type of battery that’s free of cobalt, nickel, and other heavy metals, avoiding the environmental and humanitarian issues related to lithium-ion technology.

When optimised for performance, the battery has a higher power density than lithium-ion, meaning potentially smaller batteries that could be transformative for technology like electric aircraft.


In addition, the new battery independently developed by Tesla is a combination of dry battery technology and a supercapacitor. The combination of these two technologies has the potential to increase energy density, and hence driving range, as well as increase charging speed.

There are studies for developing solid-state battery technology. Today’s best-in-class LIB cells contain a liquid electrolyte. Solid-state batteries, which include a solid electrolyte instead of a liquid one, have the potential to achieve a higher energy density. In combination with the new battery pack and battery module developments, the endurance of battery could significantly be extended.

Saft R&D is working on developing solid-state battery technology. It is focusing on two main material types: polymers and inorganic compounds, aiming at the synergy of physicochemical properties such as processability, stability, and conductivity.

Submarines of Japan & South Korea
“In March 2020, the JMSDF (Japanese Maritime Self Defence Force) became the first navy in the world to operationalise lithium-ion battery technology on submarines onboard its newest submarine, JS Ouryo, the 11th of the Soryu class submarines commissioned in March 2020. Lithium-ion batteries will also power the 12th and last of the Soryu class and the forthcoming Tiagei class, the first of which was launched in November 2020. Many more navies are expected to follow suit with the South Korean Navy’s new KSS-III submarines, currently under construction also being fitted with this technology,” says Indian Navy veteran Commodore Anil Jai Singh.

According to the former submariner, “The South Koreans are planning to go a step further than the Japanese. While the Japanese have done away with their Stirling engine based Air-independent Propulsion (AIP) system onboard the Ouryo and its successor, the South Koreans are planning to reconfigure their fuel cell AIP system to operate in conjunction with the lithium-ion batteries on board. This will greatly enhance both, the speed and the endurance of diesel-electric submarines (SSK). Most other submarine manufacturers are expected to follow suit with each of them in various stages of developing Li-ion battery systems for their respective designs.”
 

Srinie

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The great Indian Armed Forces GSQRS saga continues (Since it is Ruskis take it with a grain of salt )
 

WolfPack86

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KSS-III submarine
The KSS-III submarine, also classified as the Dosan Ahn Changho-class submarines - is a series of diesel-electric attack submarines currently being built for the Republic of Korea Navy (ROKN), jointly by Daewoo Shipbuilding & Marine Engineering (DSME) and Hyundai Heavy Industries (HHI).[4] The KSS-III is the final phase of the Korean Attack Submarine program, a three-phased program to build 27 attack submarines for the ROKN, between 1994–2029.[22]

The KSS-III initiative consists of the development of nine diesel-electric attack submarines, capable of firing submarine-launched ballistic missiles (SLBM), to be built in three batches, between 2014–2029.[4][23]

A total of three submarines of the first batch of the series have been launched, with the first submarine, ROKS Dosan Ahn Changho, being commissioned on 13 August 2019.[2]

Design[edit]
Background[edit]

The design of the KSS-III was jointly designed by Daewoo Shipbuilding & Marine Engineering (DSME) and Hyundai Heavy Industries (HHI) - two of South Korea's largest shipbuilding enterprises; preparations for the design began in 2007.[24][25] The KSS-III are the largest submarines to ever be built by South Korea and are reportedly based on the design of the German-origin Type 214 submarine - developed by ThyssenKrupp Marine Systems (TKMS) and license-built by both DSME and HHI, between 2002-2020.[26][27]

Batch-I[edit]
The Batch-I series is the first phase of the KSS-III program - consisting of the construction of three attack submarines - with the first two to be built by DSME and the third one to be built by HHI.[28]

The Batch-I design possesses a length of 83.5 metres (273 ft 11 in), with a breadth of 9.6 m (31 ft 6 in) and a draught of 7.62 m (25 ft 0 in) - with a displacement of 3,358 tonnes (3,305 long tons) while surfaced and 3,750 tonnes (3,690 long tons) while submerged; they are the first submarines with a displacement of 3,000 tonnes to ever be built by South Korea.[29][16][30][31] According to DSME, over 76% of the submarine's components were procured from within South Korea.[31]

The Batch-I design has an estimated speed of about 12 knots (22 km/h; 14 mph) while surfaced, and 20 knots (37 km/h; 23 mph) while submerged - and possesses a cruising range of around 10,000 nautical miles (19,000 km; 12,000 mi), at economic speed, along with a crew complement of 50.[32] The design further incorporates an indigenously-designed fuel-cell powered air-independent propulsion (AIP) module - which enables the submarine to conduct long-distance underwater operations for up to 20 days.[33]

The design accommodates six Korean Vertical Launching System (K-VLS) cells, located behind the submarine's sail - for carrying six Hyunmoo 4-4 submarine-launched ballistic missiles (SLBM), along with six 533-millimetre (21 in) forward-firing torpedo tubes, located at the bow.[34] Coincidentally, the KSS-III is the first ever AIP-equipped attack-submarine, capable of launching submarine-launched ballistic missiles.[19]

Batch-II[edit]
The Batch-II series constitutes the second phase of the KSS-III program - and is noted to possess multiple improvements in terms of design, armament and automation, over the Batch-I series.[35]

The Batch-II design possesses a length of 89 m (292 ft), with a breadth of 9.6 m (31 ft), along with an estimated displacement of around 3,600 t (3,500 long tons).[36][37] According to DSME, the Batch-II series will be equipped with "a greater level of South Korean technology" - with over 80% of the submarine's parts to be domestically sourced.[38][39]

Similar to the Batch-I, the Batch-II will also reportedly have a top speed of 20 knots (37 km/h; 23 mph) and a crew complement of 50.[36]

A notable feature of the Batch-II submarines is its lithium-ion battery technology (LiB); the Batch-II series will be equipped with lithium-ion batteries - developed by Samsung SDI (and supplied by Hanwha Defense), apart from the AIP system.[40] Compared to previous lead-acid batteries which are generally used to power other conventionally-powered submarines, the new lithium-ion batteries will reportedly allow the KSS-III to cruise at greater speeds with a greater period of underwater endurance, life-expectancy and durability.[41] Incidentally, Korea is only the second country in the world to field submarines equipped with lithium-ion batteries; the first is Japan - which utilizes lithium-ion battery technology aboard its Sōryū-class submarines.[42]

The design also incorporates ten (K-VLS) cells (compared to six on the Batch-I) - which are presumably to carry the Hyunmoo 4-4 ballistic missiles and the future Chonryong land-attack cruise missile.[43]

Instrumentation[edit]
Armament[edit]

  • Torpedoes – The KSS-III is equipped with six 533 mm (21 in) forward-firing torpedo tubes, for firing the "Tiger Shark" heavyweight torpedoes, developed by LIG Nex1.[44][45]
  • Missiles – The Batch-I submarines are equipped with six K-VLS cells, capable of launching the Hyunmoo 4-4 ballistic missiles - which is estimated to possess a range of around 500 km (310 mi).[40][46] In stark contrast, the Batch-II submarines will be equipped to ten K-VLS cells - presumably for carrying the Hyunmoo 4-4 - as well as the future Chonryong land-attack cruise missile, currently in development.[43][47]
  • Weapon Handling System – The Batch-I vessels are also equipped with a "Weapons Handling and Launch System" (WHLS) - developed by UK-based naval conglomerate Babcock International.[16]
Sensors[edit]
The Batch-I series is currently equipped with an assortment of different sensors and equipment, including:

  • Combat Management Suite – A "Naval Shield Integrated Combat Management System" (ICMS), developed by Hanhwa.[48]
  • Sonar – A sonar suite, developed by LIG Nex1, comprising:-[49]
    • Flank-array sonar (FAS)
    • Towed-array sonar
    • Intercept-passive sonar
    • Continuous-active sonar (CAS)
    • Mine-avoidance sonar, developed by Thales[15]
  • Electronic warfare – "Pegaso" radar electronic support-measures (RESM), developed by Indra.[50]
  • Other systems
Construction[edit]
Batch-I[edit]

On 26 December 2012 - South Korea's Ministry of National Defense (MND) contracted DSME to build the first two Batch-I submarines - at an estimated cost of USD $1.56 billion.[16] On 30 November 2016 - the MND contracted HHI to build the third submarine of the series.[28]

The construction of the first submarine began in November 2014, with a "steel-cutting" ceremony at DSME's shipyard in Okpo, South Korea[52] The submarine, christened as the Dosan Ahn Chnagho, was launched in an elaborate ceremony on 14 September 2018 - an event that was attended by senior representatives from South Korea's government and military, including South Korean president Moon Jae-in.[52] Dosan Ahn Changho began its sea trials in June 2019 and was commissioned into the ROKN on 13 August 2021.[52]

Work on the second submarine began - with the laying of its keel in July 2016.[28] Christened as the Ahn Mu, the submarine was launched on 10 November 2020.[53] It is scheduled to be delivered by 2022.[53]

The construction of the third and final submarine began in June 2017, at HHI's shipbuilding facility in Ulsan, South Korea.[28] Christened as the Shin Chae-ho, the submarine was launched on 28 September 2021.[54] It is scheduled to be delivered by 2024.[54]

Batch-II[edit]
On 11 October 2019, South Korea's Defense Acquisition Program Administration (DAPA) contracted DSME to design and build the first Batch-II submarine - at an estimated cost KRW ₩1.11 trillion.[55] On 10 September 2019, DSME was again contracted to build the second Batch-II submarine - at an estimated cost of ₩985.7 billion.[56]

The construction of the first submarine - the Lee Bong-chang, began in August 2021 and is scheduled to be delivered to the ROKN in 2026.[57] The construction of the second submarine began in December 2021 and is scheduled to be delivered to the ROKN by 2028.[58]

Export variants[edit]
DSME-2000[edit]

At the 2019 convention of the "International Maritime Defense Industry Exhibition" (MADEX), held at Busan, South Korea, DSME unveiled the DSME-2000 - a 2,000 t (2,000 long tons), diesel-electric variant of the KSS-III, as an export-oriented design for foreign navies.[59]

The DSME-2000 possesses a length of 70.3 m (230 ft 8 in) and a diameter of 6.3 m (20 ft 8 in), with a crew complement of 40, with additional space for about 10 special forces commandos.[14] The design has an estimated speed of 10 knots (19 km/h; 12 mph) while surfaced, and 20 knots (37 km/h; 23 mph) while submerged and possesses a cruising range of around 10,000 nmi (19,000 km; 12,000 mi), at cruising speed.[14]

The DSME-2000 displaces at 2,000 tonnes and is larger than South Korea's Jang Bogo-class submarine (based on the Type 209/1400 design) and the Son Won-il class (based on the Type 214 design), but is smaller than the Dosan Ahn Changho class.[59]

The design incorporates an arrangement of eight 533 mm (21.0 in) forward-firing torpedo tubes, with a pack of 16 torpedoes - although this can be combined with an assortment of naval mines and anti-ship missiles.[59] The submarine's design also features a flexible weapon launching system - which can be tailored according to the customer's requirements.[14]

Similar to the KSS-III, the DSME-2000 will also be equipped with an AIP module and lithium-ion batteries.[14] The design also includes an assortment of equipment, including -

DSME-3000[edit]
DSME has offered a 3,000-tonne variant of the KSS-III, known as the DSME-3000 to the Indian Navy, under the latter's Project-75 (India) (P-75I) submarine procurement initiative.[60] The DSME-3000 is noted to be quite similar to the KSS-III, featuring a displacement of about 3,300 t, with a length measuring 83.5 m (273 ft 11 in) and a beam measuring 9.7 m (31 ft 10 in).[61] The DSME-3000 was first displayed to the public at the 2021 convention of the "International Maritime Defense Industry Exhibition" (MADEX), held at Busan, South Korea.[60]

The DSME-3000 will be equipped with lithium-ion batteries and a fuel-cell powered AIP system, as on the KSS-III; however, the variant being offered to India lacks the K-VLS cells, which are standard on both Batch-I and Batch-II submarines being built for the Republic of Korea Navy.[60]

DSME entered the competition in April 2019 and was later shortlisted as a finalist, along with four other international shipyards - ThyssenKrupp Marine Systems (TKMS), Rubin Design Bureau, Navantia and Naval Group.[62][63] As of September 2021, the firm is reported to be the only remaining contender; the other four contenders either withdrew or were disqualified from the program, on account of varying reasons.[64]

Ships in the class[edit]
Batch-II
Batch-I
NamePennant NumberBuilderLaid DownLaunchedCommissionedStatus
ROKS Dosan Ahn ChanghoSS-083[2]Daewoo Shipbuilding & Marine Engineering (DSME)17 May 2016[28]14 September 2018[2]13 August 2021[2]Active[2]
ROKS Ahn MuSS-085[28]1 July 2016[28]10 November 2020[28]Scheduled for 2022[28]Launched[28]
ROKS Shin Chae-hoSS-086[65]Hyundai Heavy Industries (HHI)11 April 2019[65]28 September 2021[65]Scheduled for 2024[65]Launched[65]
ROKS Lee Bong-chang[66]SS-087[67]Daewoo Shipbuilding & Marine Engineering (DSME)Scheduled for 2026[67]Under construction[67]

See also

General characteristics
Class overview
Model of a Dosan Ahn Changho-class (Batch-I) submarine.
Builders
Operators
Republic of Korea Navy (ROKN)
Preceded bySon Won-il class (Type 214 submarine)
CostUSD $900,000,000 per submarine[1]
Built2014–present[4]
In service2021-present[2]
Planned9[5]
Building4[6][7]
Completed1[3]
Active1[2]
TypeAttack submarine
Displacement
  • Batch-I:-
  • 3,358 t (3,305 long tons) (Surfaced)[4]
  • 3,750 t (3,690 long tons) (Submerged)[4]
  • Batch-II:-
  • 3,600 t (3,500 long tons)[9]
Length
  • Batch-I:-
  • 83.5 m (273 ft 11 in)[4]
  • Batch-II:-
  • 89.0 m (292 ft 0 in)[11]
Beam
  • Batch-I:-
  • 9.6 m (31 ft 6 in)[4]
  • Batch-II:-
  • 9.6 m (31 ft 6 in)[13]
Draught
  • Batch-I:
  • 7.62 m (25 ft 0 in)
Propulsion
Speed
  • 12 knots (22 km/h; 14 mph) (surfaced)[21]
  • 20 knots (37 km/h; 23 mph) (submerged)[21]
Range10,000 nmi (19,000 km; 12,000 mi)[8]
Endurance20 days (submerged)[12]
Complement50[4]
Sensors and
processing systems
Armament
NotesFirst-ever AIP-equipped submarine capable of launching submarine-launched ballistic missiles (SLBM).[19]

 

BON PLAN

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KSS-III submarine
The KSS-III submarine, also classified as the Dosan Ahn Changho-class submarines - is a series of diesel-electric attack submarines currently being built for the Republic of Korea Navy (ROKN), jointly by Daewoo Shipbuilding & Marine Engineering (DSME) and Hyundai Heavy Industries (HHI).[4] The KSS-III is the final phase of the Korean Attack Submarine program, a three-phased program to build 27 attack submarines for the ROKN, between 1994–2029.[22]

The KSS-III initiative consists of the development of nine diesel-electric attack submarines, capable of firing submarine-launched ballistic missiles (SLBM), to be built in three batches, between 2014–2029.[4][23]

A total of three submarines of the first batch of the series have been launched, with the first submarine, ROKS Dosan Ahn Changho, being commissioned on 13 August 2019.[2]

Design[edit]
Background[edit]

The design of the KSS-III was jointly designed by Daewoo Shipbuilding & Marine Engineering (DSME) and Hyundai Heavy Industries (HHI) - two of South Korea's largest shipbuilding enterprises; preparations for the design began in 2007.[24][25] The KSS-III are the largest submarines to ever be built by South Korea and are reportedly based on the design of the German-origin Type 214 submarine - developed by ThyssenKrupp Marine Systems (TKMS) and license-built by both DSME and HHI, between 2002-2020.[26][27]

Batch-I[edit]
The Batch-I series is the first phase of the KSS-III program - consisting of the construction of three attack submarines - with the first two to be built by DSME and the third one to be built by HHI.[28]

The Batch-I design possesses a length of 83.5 metres (273 ft 11 in), with a breadth of 9.6 m (31 ft 6 in) and a draught of 7.62 m (25 ft 0 in) - with a displacement of 3,358 tonnes (3,305 long tons) while surfaced and 3,750 tonnes (3,690 long tons) while submerged; they are the first submarines with a displacement of 3,000 tonnes to ever be built by South Korea.[29][16][30][31] According to DSME, over 76% of the submarine's components were procured from within South Korea.[31]

The Batch-I design has an estimated speed of about 12 knots (22 km/h; 14 mph) while surfaced, and 20 knots (37 km/h; 23 mph) while submerged - and possesses a cruising range of around 10,000 nautical miles (19,000 km; 12,000 mi), at economic speed, along with a crew complement of 50.[32] The design further incorporates an indigenously-designed fuel-cell powered air-independent propulsion (AIP) module - which enables the submarine to conduct long-distance underwater operations for up to 20 days.[33]

The design accommodates six Korean Vertical Launching System (K-VLS) cells, located behind the submarine's sail - for carrying six Hyunmoo 4-4 submarine-launched ballistic missiles (SLBM), along with six 533-millimetre (21 in) forward-firing torpedo tubes, located at the bow.[34] Coincidentally, the KSS-III is the first ever AIP-equipped attack-submarine, capable of launching submarine-launched ballistic missiles.[19]

Batch-II[edit]
The Batch-II series constitutes the second phase of the KSS-III program - and is noted to possess multiple improvements in terms of design, armament and automation, over the Batch-I series.[35]

The Batch-II design possesses a length of 89 m (292 ft), with a breadth of 9.6 m (31 ft), along with an estimated displacement of around 3,600 t (3,500 long tons).[36][37] According to DSME, the Batch-II series will be equipped with "a greater level of South Korean technology" - with over 80% of the submarine's parts to be domestically sourced.[38][39]

Similar to the Batch-I, the Batch-II will also reportedly have a top speed of 20 knots (37 km/h; 23 mph) and a crew complement of 50.[36]

A notable feature of the Batch-II submarines is its lithium-ion battery technology (LiB); the Batch-II series will be equipped with lithium-ion batteries - developed by Samsung SDI (and supplied by Hanwha Defense), apart from the AIP system.[40] Compared to previous lead-acid batteries which are generally used to power other conventionally-powered submarines, the new lithium-ion batteries will reportedly allow the KSS-III to cruise at greater speeds with a greater period of underwater endurance, life-expectancy and durability.[41] Incidentally, Korea is only the second country in the world to field submarines equipped with lithium-ion batteries; the first is Japan - which utilizes lithium-ion battery technology aboard its Sōryū-class submarines.[42]

The design also incorporates ten (K-VLS) cells (compared to six on the Batch-I) - which are presumably to carry the Hyunmoo 4-4 ballistic missiles and the future Chonryong land-attack cruise missile.[43]

Instrumentation[edit]
Armament[edit]

  • Torpedoes – The KSS-III is equipped with six 533 mm (21 in) forward-firing torpedo tubes, for firing the "Tiger Shark" heavyweight torpedoes, developed by LIG Nex1.[44][45]
  • Missiles – The Batch-I submarines are equipped with six K-VLS cells, capable of launching the Hyunmoo 4-4 ballistic missiles - which is estimated to possess a range of around 500 km (310 mi).[40][46] In stark contrast, the Batch-II submarines will be equipped to ten K-VLS cells - presumably for carrying the Hyunmoo 4-4 - as well as the future Chonryong land-attack cruise missile, currently in development.[43][47]
  • Weapon Handling System – The Batch-I vessels are also equipped with a "Weapons Handling and Launch System" (WHLS) - developed by UK-based naval conglomerate Babcock International.[16]
Sensors[edit]
The Batch-I series is currently equipped with an assortment of different sensors and equipment, including:

  • Combat Management Suite – A "Naval Shield Integrated Combat Management System" (ICMS), developed by Hanhwa.[48]
  • Sonar – A sonar suite, developed by LIG Nex1, comprising:-[49]
    • Flank-array sonar (FAS)
    • Towed-array sonar
    • Intercept-passive sonar
    • Continuous-active sonar (CAS)
    • Mine-avoidance sonar, developed by Thales[15]
  • Electronic warfare – "Pegaso" radar electronic support-measures (RESM), developed by Indra.[50]
  • Other systems
Construction[edit]
Batch-I[edit]

On 26 December 2012 - South Korea's Ministry of National Defense (MND) contracted DSME to build the first two Batch-I submarines - at an estimated cost of USD $1.56 billion.[16] On 30 November 2016 - the MND contracted HHI to build the third submarine of the series.[28]

The construction of the first submarine began in November 2014, with a "steel-cutting" ceremony at DSME's shipyard in Okpo, South Korea[52] The submarine, christened as the Dosan Ahn Chnagho, was launched in an elaborate ceremony on 14 September 2018 - an event that was attended by senior representatives from South Korea's government and military, including South Korean president Moon Jae-in.[52] Dosan Ahn Changho began its sea trials in June 2019 and was commissioned into the ROKN on 13 August 2021.[52]

Work on the second submarine began - with the laying of its keel in July 2016.[28] Christened as the Ahn Mu, the submarine was launched on 10 November 2020.[53] It is scheduled to be delivered by 2022.[53]

The construction of the third and final submarine began in June 2017, at HHI's shipbuilding facility in Ulsan, South Korea.[28] Christened as the Shin Chae-ho, the submarine was launched on 28 September 2021.[54] It is scheduled to be delivered by 2024.[54]

Batch-II[edit]
On 11 October 2019, South Korea's Defense Acquisition Program Administration (DAPA) contracted DSME to design and build the first Batch-II submarine - at an estimated cost KRW ₩1.11 trillion.[55] On 10 September 2019, DSME was again contracted to build the second Batch-II submarine - at an estimated cost of ₩985.7 billion.[56]

The construction of the first submarine - the Lee Bong-chang, began in August 2021 and is scheduled to be delivered to the ROKN in 2026.[57] The construction of the second submarine began in December 2021 and is scheduled to be delivered to the ROKN by 2028.[58]

Export variants[edit]
DSME-2000[edit]

At the 2019 convention of the "International Maritime Defense Industry Exhibition" (MADEX), held at Busan, South Korea, DSME unveiled the DSME-2000 - a 2,000 t (2,000 long tons), diesel-electric variant of the KSS-III, as an export-oriented design for foreign navies.[59]

The DSME-2000 possesses a length of 70.3 m (230 ft 8 in) and a diameter of 6.3 m (20 ft 8 in), with a crew complement of 40, with additional space for about 10 special forces commandos.[14] The design has an estimated speed of 10 knots (19 km/h; 12 mph) while surfaced, and 20 knots (37 km/h; 23 mph) while submerged and possesses a cruising range of around 10,000 nmi (19,000 km; 12,000 mi), at cruising speed.[14]

The DSME-2000 displaces at 2,000 tonnes and is larger than South Korea's Jang Bogo-class submarine (based on the Type 209/1400 design) and the Son Won-il class (based on the Type 214 design), but is smaller than the Dosan Ahn Changho class.[59]

The design incorporates an arrangement of eight 533 mm (21.0 in) forward-firing torpedo tubes, with a pack of 16 torpedoes - although this can be combined with an assortment of naval mines and anti-ship missiles.[59] The submarine's design also features a flexible weapon launching system - which can be tailored according to the customer's requirements.[14]

Similar to the KSS-III, the DSME-2000 will also be equipped with an AIP module and lithium-ion batteries.[14] The design also includes an assortment of equipment, including -

DSME-3000[edit]
DSME has offered a 3,000-tonne variant of the KSS-III, known as the DSME-3000 to the Indian Navy, under the latter's Project-75 (India) (P-75I) submarine procurement initiative.[60] The DSME-3000 is noted to be quite similar to the KSS-III, featuring a displacement of about 3,300 t, with a length measuring 83.5 m (273 ft 11 in) and a beam measuring 9.7 m (31 ft 10 in).[61] The DSME-3000 was first displayed to the public at the 2021 convention of the "International Maritime Defense Industry Exhibition" (MADEX), held at Busan, South Korea.[60]

The DSME-3000 will be equipped with lithium-ion batteries and a fuel-cell powered AIP system, as on the KSS-III; however, the variant being offered to India lacks the K-VLS cells, which are standard on both Batch-I and Batch-II submarines being built for the Republic of Korea Navy.[60]

DSME entered the competition in April 2019 and was later shortlisted as a finalist, along with four other international shipyards - ThyssenKrupp Marine Systems (TKMS), Rubin Design Bureau, Navantia and Naval Group.[62][63] As of September 2021, the firm is reported to be the only remaining contender; the other four contenders either withdrew or were disqualified from the program, on account of varying reasons.[64]

Ships in the class[edit]
NamePennant NumberBuilderLaid DownLaunchedCommissionedStatus
Batch-I
Batch-II
ROKS Dosan Ahn ChanghoSS-083[2]Daewoo Shipbuilding & Marine Engineering (DSME)17 May 2016[28]14 September 2018[2]13 August 2021[2]Active[2]
ROKS Ahn MuSS-085[28]1 July 2016[28]10 November 2020[28]Scheduled for 2022[28]Launched[28]
ROKS Shin Chae-hoSS-086[65]Hyundai Heavy Industries (HHI)11 April 2019[65]28 September 2021[65]Scheduled for 2024[65]Launched[65]
ROKS Lee Bong-chang[66]SS-087[67]Daewoo Shipbuilding & Marine Engineering (DSME)Scheduled for 2026[67]Under construction[67]

See also

Class overview
General characteristics
Model of a Dosan Ahn Changho-class (Batch-I) submarine.
Builders
Operators
Republic of Korea Navy (ROKN)
Preceded bySon Won-il class (Type 214 submarine)
CostUSD $900,000,000 per submarine[1]
Built2014–present[4]
In service2021-present[2]
Planned9[5]
Building4[6][7]
Completed1[3]
Active1[2]
TypeAttack submarine
Displacement
  • Batch-I:-
  • 3,358 t (3,305 long tons) (Surfaced)[4]
  • 3,750 t (3,690 long tons) (Submerged)[4]
  • Batch-II:-
  • 3,600 t (3,500 long tons)[9]
Length
  • Batch-I:-
  • 83.5 m (273 ft 11 in)[4]
  • Batch-II:-
  • 89.0 m (292 ft 0 in)[11]
Beam
  • Batch-I:-
  • 9.6 m (31 ft 6 in)[4]
  • Batch-II:-
  • 9.6 m (31 ft 6 in)[13]
Draught
  • Batch-I:
  • 7.62 m (25 ft 0 in)
Propulsion
Speed
  • 12 knots (22 km/h; 14 mph) (surfaced)[21]
  • 20 knots (37 km/h; 23 mph) (submerged)[21]
Range10,000 nmi (19,000 km; 12,000 mi)[8]
Endurance20 days (submerged)[12]
Complement50[4]
Sensors and
processing systems
Armament
NotesFirst-ever AIP-equipped submarine capable of launching submarine-launched ballistic missiles (SLBM).[19]
Very impressive !
I see 2 clear weakness : the SK combat suite (SK has no real experince in it) and a not mature design. If not it's quite impressive.
Note the price : 900 $millions made in SK.
 

no smoking

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Very impressive !
I see 2 clear weakness : the SK combat suite (SK has no real experince in it) and a not mature design. If not it's quite impressive.
Note the price : 900 $millions made in SK.
That is the enlarged version of Germany submarine design.
All the key sub-systems are imported. Now may have some Korean components.
 

WolfPack86

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This submarine of Germany can become a part of the Indian Navy, not Russia, know how it hunts
Highlights

  • According to Indian defense sources, the stealth design of the Type 212CD is brand new.
  • This submarine has a new combat system, which is known as ORCA.
  • After this system, a huge amount of sensor data can be tested.

Berlin : The German Type 212CD submarine is being considered for induction into the Indian Navy 's Project 75I. According to defense sources, this German submarine is leading the race for the project. However, defense experts are disappointed by this. The world's top defense experts give zero numbers to this German submarine. He says that this submarine is far behind in terms of today's modern technology. Let us tell you that Russia is very disappointed with the attitude of the Indian government. He has pulled out of the project and has cited too stringent conditions for it.



How is Germany's submarine
According to Indian defense sources, the stealth design of Type 212CD is brand new. Its lower bottom is diamond-shaped and because of this, it can destabilize the waves of active sonar. CD stands for Common Design and this submarine has a new combat system known as ORCA. After this system, a huge amount of sensor data can be tested. Germany's Thyssenkrupp Marine System (TKMS) is building two such submarines, one for the German Navy and one for the Norwegian Navy.


The cost of a submarine The
government of Germany and Norway signed a joint agreement in June 2017. Under this, missiles for the Navy will also be manufactured. According to a report, the construction of two submarines will cost about $ 6.4 billion. Their construction work will be completed in the year 2023. After this, in the year 2029, a submarine will be handed over to the Norwegian army. At the same time, the German Navy will get this submarine in the years 2031 and 2034. This submarine will be kept in service till the year 2060.

What is Project 75
Project 75I or Project 75 was termed as an ambitious project for the Indian Navy. Under this project, 6 advanced submarines were to be built. In January 2020, the Defense Acquisition Council (DAC) named Mazagon Docks Limited and Larsen & Turbo as Indian partners in the project. Apart from this, two companies from South Korea, one from France, one each from Spain, Russia and Germany were selected. Recently, on behalf of a senior Russian official, it has been said that the conditions which were placed by India are completely unreal. According to them, until these conditions are not changed, this process cannot proceed further.

Extended Deadline The deadline of this project has been extended by
the Ministry of Defense for the next 6 months on June 30. Now by the end of December, Russia will have to take a decision in this deadline. General Andrey Baranov, Deputy Director of the Rubin Design Bureau of Russia, said at the Army-2022 Expo that the requirements placed in the Request for Proposal (RFI) from the Indian side are very strict. After these conditions, a lot of responsibilities fall on the designer. He says that the designer has no control over the manufacturing which happens in India. Russia requested

The Indian Navy has also requested the Defense Ministry that certain conditions should be relaxed. Baranov said that the specific requirements put forward by the Navy are actually a matter of concern. He said that the Indian Navy wants that transfer of technology, state of the art submarines with powerful missiles, stealth and some such conditions have been kept under the project. But no navy in the world has a prototype of such a submarine.
 

BON PLAN

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ABOUT ANOTHER SUB DEAL ....

 

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