Out-of-control’ Chinese rocket falling to Earth could partially survive re-entry, Pathetic failure record of Chinese rockets continues.

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Out-of-control’ Chinese rocket falling to Earth could partially survive re-entry
Long March 5B is doing 27,600km/h in failing orbit, with eventual crash site unknown, after launching space station hub
The Long March5B rocket launched a module of China’s space station on 29 April. The rocket’s core is expected to make an uncontrolled re-entry this week.

The Long March5B Chinese rocket launched a module of the country’s space station on 29 April. The rocket’s core is falling out of Earth’s orbit and is expected to make an uncontrolled re-entry this week.
Photograph: VCG/Getty Images

Alison Rourke
Tue 4 May 2021 03.55 BST


4,272

Part of a huge rocket that launched China’s first module for its Tianhe space station is falling back to Earth and could make an uncontrolled re-entry at an unknown landing point.
The 30-metre high core of the Long March 5B rocket launched the “Heavenly Harmony” unmanned core module into low Earth orbit on 29 April from Wenchang in China’s Hainan province.

The Long March 5B then itself entered a temporary orbit, setting the stage for one of the largest ever uncontrolled re-entries. Some experts fear it could land on an inhabited area.


China launches first module of new space station
Read more

“It’s potentially not good,” said Jonathan McDowell, Astrophysicist at the Astrophysics Center at Harvard University.
“Last time they launched a Long March 5B rocket they ended up with big long rods of metal flying through the sky and damaging several buildings in the Ivory Coast,” he said.
“Most of it burned up, but there were these enormous pieces of metal that hit the ground. We are very lucky no one was hurt.”
On Tuesday the core was orbiting Earth around every 90 minutes at about 27,600km/h and an altitude of more than 300km. The US military has named it 2021-035B and its path can be seen on websites including orbit.ing-now.com.

01:13
Heavenly Harmony: China launches first module of new space station – video
Since the weekend it has dropped nearly 80km in altitude and SpaceNews reported that amateur ground observations showed it was tumbling and not under control. This, and its speed, makes it impossible to predict where it will land when Earth’s atmosphere eventually drags it down, though McDowell said the most likely outcome is that it will fall into the sea, as the ocean covers about 71% of the planet.
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But McDowell says some pieces of the rocket will survive re-entry and that it would be the “equivalent of a small plane crash scattered over 100 miles”.
Since 1990 nothing over 10 tonnes has been deliberately left in orbit to re-enter uncontrolled. The Long March 5B core stage is thought to be about 21 tonnes.
“What’s bad is that it’s really negligent on China’s part. Things more than ten tonnes we don’t let them fall out of the sky uncontrolled deliberately,” McDowell said.
Based on its current orbit the rocket is passing over Earth as far north as New York, Madrid and Beijing and as far south as southern Chile and Wellington, New Zealand, and could make its re-entry at any point within this area.
Given its velocity, a small change in its path could make a big difference to where it ends up. It’s expected to return to Earth on 10 May, plus or minus two days.
McDowell said once it’s clear the day it is returning to Earth, experts could predict its landing time within a six-hour window.
The rocket’s launch was part of 11 planned missions as part of the construction of China’s space station, which is expected to be completed in late 2022. The T-shaped space station is expected to weigh about 60 tonnes, considerably smaller than the International Space Station, which launched its first module in 1998 and weighs about 408 tonnes.
China’s space station will have a docking port and will also be able to connect with a Chinese satellite. Theoretically it could be expanded to as many as six modules.

 

HariPrasad-1

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So chinese rocket has continued its pathetic record. In last 2 to 3 years, their 3 so called heavy lift rockets have failed. One more is coming back to earth to hit anywhere. Any goods of China has as much reliability as Xin ping's commitment on human right.
 

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It Sunk with a communication satellite in 2017.



China’s most powerful rocket failed yesterday. What does that mean for the country’s space plans?
14
The Long March 5 is a crucial part of China’s spaceflight future
By Loren Grush@lorengrush Jul 3, 2017, 12:58pm EDT
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China’s Long March 5 rocket, which suffered a failure during launch on July 2nd. Photo by VCG/VCG via Getty Images
Yesterday, the launch of a Chinese communications satellite ended in failure when the rocket carrying the probe somehow malfunctioned during flight. It’s a significant loss for China since the vehicle that failed — the Long March 5 — is the country’s premier heavy-lift rocket. And its failure could have a big impact on the future of China’s ambitions in space.
It’s still unclear exactly what happened. Shortly after the flight, China’s official press agency, Xinhua, simply reported that “an anomaly occurred” during launch and that there would be an investigation into the problem. But some clues seem to indicate the issue may have started in the main core of the rocket. A plume of gas was seen around the main engines of the vehicle about six minutes into flight, according to Spaceflight 101.
“THIS IS IMPORTANT. THE LONG MARCH 5 IS THEIR FLAGSHIP ROCKET.”
It was only the second launch of this particular type of rocket. However, China has big plans for this vehicle: the Long March 5 is one of the most powerful rockets in the world, nearly matching the capability of the US’s Delta-IV Heavy. The next flight of the Long March 5 is meant to go to the Moon, sending two modules to the lunar surface — one to collect samples and another to return those samples to Earth. This mission was tentatively scheduled for November of this year, but yesterday’s failure makes that timeline uncertain.
“This is important. The Long March 5 is their flagship rocket,” Jonathan McDowell, an astrophysicist at Harvard and spaceflight expert, tells The Verge. “It’s key for their ambitions. ... They’ve got to get it right.”
The rocket is just one way China has significantly updated its spaceflight program. For most of the 20th century, the country launched satellites fairly infrequently, maybe a handful each year. But then in the 1990s, China ramped up its space initiatives. The country has been steadily increasing the amount of yearly launches, and the scope of these missions continues to grow. China made headlines in 2013 when it put a lander and rover on the Moon’s surface. And last year, China launched its longest crewed spaceflight mission to date. For 30 days, two taikonauts — China’s astronauts — stayed on board the Tiangong-2 space station, a laboratory meant to test out technologies needed for a future, more permanent orbital station.
A rendering of the lander China hopes to send to Mars. Xinhua News Agency / Getty Images
China also started developing a new family of Long March rockets to take over as the country’s primary vehicles: the Long March 5, the Long March 6, and the Long March 7. These vehicles, which just started flying a couple of years ago, represent a new direction for the country’s spaceflight technology. They use liquid oxygen and kerosene — propellants that are much less toxic and corrosive than what previous Long March rockets used. They also take off from a brand new launch site on China’s Hainan Island, which allows the rocket to fly over water after takeoff. That avoids rocket parts falling near inhabited areas.
It’s with these rockets, especially the Long March 5, that China hopes to do big things in space. Not only is the Long March 5 needed for the lunar sample return mission, it’s also meant to launch the core module for China’s future space station, which is slated to begin construction in 2019. There are even plans to launch a mission to Mars in 2020 using the Long March 5; that mission would include an orbiter, a lander, and a rover.
YESTERDAY’S FAILURE COULD PUT A SLIGHT HOLD ON CHINA’S GROWTH
China’s ambition has led to a lot of speculation over whether the country will at some point match the US in spaceflight capability. But yesterday’s failure could put a slight hold on that growth, and it could spell a problem for the Long March 6 and 7 — not just the 5. “The 5, 6, and 7 use the same components,” says McDowell. “A problem with one of them potentially affects all of them. And their whole future program depends on these family of rockets being reliable.”
The good news is that the inaugural launch of the Long March 5 went just fine — so the problem isn’t catastrophic. There likely isn’t a major flaw with the rocket’s design, and the fact that the failure arose minutes after takeoff, not just seconds, means there will be a lot of data to go through to help determine the problem. “As failures go, it’s not the worst,” says McDowell. “But it’s certainly a blow to them.”
Still McDowell doesn’t think the country will stay on the sidelines forever. The lunar sample return may slip until next year, but he’s confident the country will push ahead soon. “This is one event in a very broad and aggressive Chinese space program that’s been pushing forward the past couple of years,” he says. “It’s not going to slow them down for very long.”
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China's Kuaizhou-11 Rocket Fails On Maiden Launch After 3-year Delay; 6 Satellites Lost
The first launch of Kuaizhou-11, a solid-fueled carrier rocket, failed after its liftoff from Jiuquan Satellite Launch Center in northwest China on July 10.

Written By
Kunal Gaurav
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China


The first launch of Kuaizhou-11 (KZ-11), a solid-fueled carrier rocket, failed after its liftoff from Jiuquan Satellite Launch Center in northwest China on July 10. According to media reports, KZ-11 failed to reach its intended orbit and the specific reasons behind the failure are currently being analysed and investigated.
The launch of the rocket, developed by ExPace Technology Corporation, a subsidiary of China Aerospace Science and Industry Corporation (CASIC), was already delayed by three years and ended up in a failure. The low-cost solid-fueled carrier rocket, with a lift-off mass of 70.8 tonnes, was designed to launch low-Earth and Sun-synchronous orbit satellites.
The Kuaizhou-11 has a larger diameter and stronger capacity with respect to the other rockets from Kuaizhou series launched previously. It can lift a 1.0-ton payload to a sun-synchronous orbit at an altitude of 700 kilometres. The three-stage rocket is reportedly based on the DF-21 missile and consists of three solid-fueled stages.
Read: Rocket Lab Electron Launch failure Causes Loss Of Rocket In Few Minutes After 'anomaly'
A derivative of DongFang-21 missile

The failed Kuaizhou-11 rocket is a derivative of the DongFang-21 missile which was recently showed off by China to deter US aircraft carriers, USS Nimitz and USS Ronald Reagan, in the South China Sea. It was conceived in 2017 and was supposed to have its first flight in 2018 but got delayed multiple times. KZ-11 was supposed to put six satellites in the orbits but failed to do so.
Earlier in May, China had announced the successful launch of a pivotal new rocket carrying a prototype deep-space spacecraft to test its ambition for operating permanent space station and sending astronauts to the moon. The carrier rocket, Long March 5B, was launched from the Wenchang launch site in the southern island of Hainan with an unmanned spacecraft and return capsule.

China's Kuaizhou-11 Rocket Fails On Maiden Launch After 3-year Delay; 6 Satellites Lost
The first launch of Kuaizhou-11, a solid-fueled carrier rocket, failed after its liftoff from Jiuquan Satellite Launch Center in northwest China on July 10.

Written By
Kunal Gaurav
facebooktwitterKoo
China


The first launch of Kuaizhou-11 (KZ-11), a solid-fueled carrier rocket, failed after its liftoff from Jiuquan Satellite Launch Center in northwest China on July 10. According to media reports, KZ-11 failed to reach its intended orbit and the specific reasons behind the failure are currently being analysed and investigated.
The launch of the rocket, developed by ExPace Technology Corporation, a subsidiary of China Aerospace Science and Industry Corporation (CASIC), was already delayed by three years and ended up in a failure. The low-cost solid-fueled carrier rocket, with a lift-off mass of 70.8 tonnes, was designed to launch low-Earth and Sun-synchronous orbit satellites.
The Kuaizhou-11 has a larger diameter and stronger capacity with respect to the other rockets from Kuaizhou series launched previously. It can lift a 1.0-ton payload to a sun-synchronous orbit at an altitude of 700 kilometres. The three-stage rocket is reportedly based on the DF-21 missile and consists of three solid-fueled stages.
Read: Rocket Lab Electron Launch failure Causes Loss Of Rocket In Few Minutes After 'anomaly'
A derivative of DongFang-21 missile

The failed Kuaizhou-11 rocket is a derivative of the DongFang-21 missile which was recently showed off by China to deter US aircraft carriers, USS Nimitz and USS Ronald Reagan, in the South China Sea. It was conceived in 2017 and was supposed to have its first flight in 2018 but got delayed multiple times. KZ-11 was supposed to put six satellites in the orbits but failed to do so.
Earlier in May, China had announced the successful launch of a pivotal new rocket carrying a prototype deep-space spacecraft to test its ambition for operating permanent space station and sending astronauts to the moon. The carrier rocket, Long March 5B, was launched from the Wenchang launch site in the southern island of Hainan with an unmanned spacecraft and return capsule.
China's Kuaizhou-11 Rocket Fails On Maiden Launch After 3-year Delay; 6 Satellites Lost
The first launch of Kuaizhou-11, a solid-fueled carrier rocket, failed after its liftoff from Jiuquan Satellite Launch Center in northwest China on July 10.

Written By
Kunal Gaurav
facebooktwitterKoo
China


The first launch of Kuaizhou-11 (KZ-11), a solid-fueled carrier rocket, failed after its liftoff from Jiuquan Satellite Launch Center in northwest China on July 10. According to media reports, KZ-11 failed to reach its intended orbit and the specific reasons behind the failure are currently being analysed and investigated.
The launch of the rocket, developed by ExPace Technology Corporation, a subsidiary of China Aerospace Science and Industry Corporation (CASIC), was already delayed by three years and ended up in a failure. The low-cost solid-fueled carrier rocket, with a lift-off mass of 70.8 tonnes, was designed to launch low-Earth and Sun-synchronous orbit satellites.
The Kuaizhou-11 has a larger diameter and stronger capacity with respect to the other rockets from Kuaizhou series launched previously. It can lift a 1.0-ton payload to a sun-synchronous orbit at an altitude of 700 kilometres. The three-stage rocket is reportedly based on the DF-21 missile and consists of three solid-fueled stages.
Read: Rocket Lab Electron Launch failure Causes Loss Of Rocket In Few Minutes After 'anomaly'
A derivative of DongFang-21 missile

The failed Kuaizhou-11 rocket is a derivative of the DongFang-21 missile which was recently showed off by China to deter US aircraft carriers, USS Nimitz and USS Ronald Reagan, in the South China Sea. It was conceived in 2017 and was supposed to have its first flight in 2018 but got delayed multiple times. KZ-11 was supposed to put six satellites in the orbits but failed to do so.
Earlier in May, China had announced the successful launch of a pivotal new rocket carrying a prototype deep-space spacecraft to test its ambition for operating permanent space station and sending astronauts to the moon. The carrier rocket, Long March 5B, was launched from the Wenchang launch site in the southern island of Hainan with an unmanned spacecraft and return capsule.


China's Kuaizhou-11 Rocket Fails On Maiden Launch After 3-year Delay; 6 Satellites Lost The first launch of Kuaizhou-11, a solid-fueled carrier rocket, failed after its liftoff from Jiuquan Satellite Launch Center in northwest China on July 10. Written By Kunal Gaurav facebook twitter KooChina The first launch of Kuaizhou-11 (KZ-11), a solid-fueled carrier rocket, failed after its liftoff from Jiuquan Satellite Launch Center in northwest China on July 10. According to media reports, KZ-11 failed to reach its intended orbit and the specific reasons behind the failure are currently being analysed and investigated. The launch of the rocket, developed by ExPace Technology Corporation, a subsidiary of China Aerospace Science and Industry Corporation (CASIC), was already delayed by three years and ended up in a failure. The low-cost solid-fueled carrier rocket, with a lift-off mass of 70.8 tonnes, was designed to launch low-Earth and Sun-synchronous orbit satellites. The Kuaizhou-11 has a larger diameter and stronger capacity with respect to the other rockets from Kuaizhou series launched previously. It can lift a 1.0-ton payload to a sun-synchronous orbit at an altitude of 700 kilometres. The three-stage rocket is reportedly based on the DF-21 missile and consists of three solid-fueled stages. Read: Rocket Lab Electron Launch failure Causes Loss Of Rocket In Few Minutes After 'anomaly' A derivative of DongFang-21 missile The failed Kuaizhou-11 rocket is a derivative of the DongFang-21 missile which was recently showed off by China to deter US aircraft carriers, USS Nimitz and USS Ronald Reagan, in the South China Sea. It was conceived in 2017 and was supposed to have its first flight in 2018 but got delayed multiple times. KZ-11 was supposed to put six satellites in the orbits but failed to do so. Earlier in May, China had announced the successful launch of a pivotal new rocket carrying a prototype deep-space spacecraft to test its ambition for operating permanent space station and sending astronauts to the moon. The carrier rocket, Long March 5B, was launched from the Wenchang launch site in the southern island of Hainan with an unmanned spacecraft and return capsule.
 

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Rocket Lab Electron Launch failure Causes Loss Of Rocket In Few Minutes After 'anomaly'
Rocket Lab Electron launch failure has incurred the loss of the rocket and the satellites it was carrying with it. Here is all about it & what the company said

Written By
Yash Tripathi
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rocket lab electron launch failure


The Rocket Lab's recent mission was unsuccessful due to an as-yet-unknown rocket failure right after its launch. According to reports, the Electron rocket experienced some kind of “an anomaly”. This resulted in the loss of the vehicle including few satellites that it carried on board.
Rocket Lab Electron launch failure in few minutes in mid-air
rocket lab electron launch failure rocket lab launch rocket lab failure electron rocket rocket lab news

On Saturday, Rocket Lab's 13th mission to send satellites into space failed because of some unknown technical problem. Initially, the Electron rocket successfully took off from Rocket Lab’s primary launch facility on the Mahia Peninsula in New Zealand at 5:19 PM ET. The reports say that the rocket took off just fine, however, in about six minutes into the launch, live video from the rocket was hindered. During this time, the Livestream from Rocket Lab revealed that the rocket started to lose speed, and the rocket dropped in altitude. However, it is said that Rocket Lab cut the Livestream and later on, the company revealed that the Electron rocket had been lost during the flight. The organisation also mentioned that a still-unidentified issue occurred about four minutes into the flight.
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rocket lab electron launch failure rocket lab launch rocket lab failure electron rocket rocket lab news

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Apologizing for the failure, Rocket Lab CEO Peter Beck said in a press statement: “We are deeply sorry to our customers Spaceflight Inc., Canon Electronics Inc., Planet, and In-Space Missions for the loss of their payloads”. He continued by saying, “We know many people poured their hearts and souls into those spacecraft. Today’s anomaly is a reminder that space launch can be unforgiving, but we will identify the issue, rectify it, and be safely back on the pad as soon as possible”.
rocket lab electron launch failure rocket lab launch rocket lab failure electron rocket rocket lab news

Also Read | NASA Findings Suggest More Metal On Moon Than Thought, Could Aid Lunar Formation Theories
The CEO also appreciated the launch team for handling the situation safely and with “professionalism”. The mission was named as “Pics Or It Didn’t Happen,” and it carried mostly Earth-imaging small satellites such as Canon Electronics’ CE-SAT-IB, designed to display Earth-imaging technology with high-resolution and wide-angle cameras. Apart from this, the rocket also carried five SuperDove satellites from the company Planet, designed to image Earth from above. Lastly, the mission also consisted of a small satellite called Faraday-1, from In-Space Missions, which hosted various instruments from startups and other organizations that needed a ride to space.
rocket lab electron launch failure rocket lab launch rocket lab failure electron rocket rocket lab news rocket lab electron launch failure rocket lab launch rocket lab failure electron rocket rocket lab news rocket lab electron launch failure rocket lab launch rocket lab failure electron rocket rocket lab news

Will Marshall, Planet’s CEO also announced the loss of the satellites on Twitter. He revealed that the organisation has plans to launch even more satellites this summer on two separate launches. In a press statement, Planet mentioned that “While it’s never the outcome that we hope for, the risk of a launch failure is one Planet is always prepared for”. According to the reports, the organisation is about to launch up to 26 of its SuperDove satellites from South America on a European Vega rocket in August.
 

HariPrasad-1

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Paper Dragon's Pathatic record of rocket continued in 2020 as well. This time with Indonesian satellite.


Chinese Long March 3B rocket fails during launch of Indonesian satellite
By Tariq Malik about 1 year ago
It's the second Chinese rocket failure in a month.
Comments (1)
A Chinese Long March 3B rocket failed to launch the Indonesian Nusantara Dua communications satellite successfully on April 8, 2020. Shown here, a similar rocket lifts off from the Xichang Satellite Launch Center on March 9.

A Chinese Long March 3B rocket failed to launch the Indonesian Nusantara Dua communications satellite successfully on April 8, 2020. Shown here, a similar rocket lifts off from the Xichang Satellite Launch Center on March 9. (Image credit: CCTV)

A Chinese rocket carrying a new communications satellite for Indonesia has failed to reach orbit in a launch gone awry, the second failure for China's space agency in less than a month, state media reported today (April 9).

The Long March 3B rocket lifted off today at 7:46 a.m. EDT (1146 GMT) from China's Xichang Satellite Launch Center in the southwestern province of Sichuan, where the local time was 7:46 p.m. on Thursday night, according to the Xinhua News Agency. The rocket was carrying the Palapa-N1, also known as the Nusantara Dua, a next-generation satellite for broadband and broadcast communications built for the Indonesian joint venture of Indosat Ooredoo and Pasifik Satelit Nusantara.
The first and second stages of the three-stage Long March 3B rocket appeared to perform well during the outset of Thursday's launch. But something went wrong with the third stage, raining debris back to Earth and destroying the Palapa-N1 satellite, Xinhua reported.
Videos posted on China's social media site Weibo showed several views of the initial launch. Other videos from Guam showed what appeared to be fiery debris streaking across the sky.


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China suffers Long March 4 failure
by Andrew Jones — May 23, 2019
Framegrab from amateur footage posted on Chinese social media following launch from Taiyuan. Credit: Sina Weibo/BrawnGP

Editors note: China’s state-run Xinhua news agency has since confirmed the failure of a Long March 4 carrying the Yaogan-33 satellite. “The first and second stages of the rocket worked normally, while the third stage had abnormal operation,” Xinhua reported. “Based on monitoring data, the third stage of the rocket and satellite debris have fallen on the ground.”
HELSINKI — A planned launch of a remote sensing satellite from Taiyuan in north China may have ended in failure, with the lack of an official statement suggesting an issue with the mission.
Airspace closure notices issued days in advance indicated a launch of a Long March rocket from Taiyuan was due to take place between 6:45 and 7:06 p.m. Eastern Wednesday (6:45-7:06 a.m. local time Thursday).
Amateur footage and images posted on Chinese social media platforms apparently consistent with a morning launch from Taiyuan Satellite Launch Center suggest the launch of a Long March 4C three-stage hypergolic rocket took place around 6:49 p.m. Eastern.
A successful launch is usually announced by the main space contractor, the China Aerospace Science and Technology Corporation (CASC), as soon as the spacecraft have entered their intended orbits. Wednesday’s launch, to place a remote sensing satellite into sun-synchronous orbit, would likely have been followed with an announcement of success within the hour.
More than 12 hours after the apparent launch, no statements from CASC nor government space authorities had been released.
SpaceNews has contacted the U.S. Air Force’s 18th Space Control Squadron, responsible for space situational awareness including detecting, tracking, cataloging and identifying artificial objects orbiting the Earth for comment on any possible new objects correlating with the launch and is awaiting a reply.
The launch took place deep inland, meaning spent rocket stages will fall
Smoke trails seen near Shiyan city shortly after launch. Credit: Sina Weibo/jiuxihuankannizhuangbiB
With the exception of major events such as crewed or lunar exploration missions, Chinese launches are rarely openly announced. Indirect means such as NOTAMS — notices filed with aviation authorities to notify of aircraft of potential hazards — are often the only indication of imminent launches.
The payload was expected by amateur aerospace watchers within China to be a Yaogan remote sensing satellite, designated Yaogan-33. Chinese state media typically state that Yaogan series satellites are used for “electromagnetic environment surveys and other related technology tests,” but outside analysts understand the satellites to be optical and synthetic aperture radar satellites for military reconnaissance purposes.
A similar launch in August 2016, also using a Long March 4C launch vehicle, believed to be carrying the Gaofen-10 satellite, part of a civilian Earth observation constellation, ended in apparent failure and was also followed by official silence. Loss of the satellite was only confirmed two weeks later by the China Great Wall Industry Corp., a CASC subsidiary.
As the issue for the Gaofen-10 launch was confined to the third stage, used only on the Long March 4C, developed by CASC subsidiary, the Shanghai Academy of Spaceflight Technology (SAST), other Long March flights were not affected. The carrier rocket did not fly again until November 2017, and in May 2018 launched the Queqiao relay satellite as a necessary precursor to the Chang’e-4 lunar far side landing on Jan 2.
If confirmed, it would be the first Chinese government launch failure since July 2017, when the second Long March 5 suffered a first stage issue. The Long March 5 has been grounded ever since, and a planned return-to-flight in July, announced in January, appears to have slipped.
Cargo vessels specially designed to transport the components of the 5-meter-diameter, 56-meter-long heavy-lift launcher from a manufacturing site in Tianjin, north China, to the Wenchang Satellite Launch Center, on the southern island province of Hainan, remain moored on the Yangtze river. The two previous Long March 5 launches required two months of launch preparations at Wenchang, leaving a July launch very unlikely.
The third Long March 5 is expected to carry an experimental communications satellite before the fourth launch can launch the Chang’e-5 lunar sample return mission, previously slated for late 2019. The country’s first independent mission to Mars is also expected to launch on the Long March 5 in the next Hohmann transfer window, in July and August 2020, while the debut of the Long March 5B, a variant for low-Earth orbit launches, is also expected in the first half of 2020, before being able to launch the first module of the Chinese Space Station.
The above missions require a successful return-to-flight of the Long March 5, which has undergone a redesign of its liquid oxygen and liquid hydrogen YF-77 first stage engines following the 2017 failure. Another slip could place huge pressure on the schedule for China’s most ambitious space projects.
Wednesday’s launch was China’s ninth of 2019, including a first orbital launch attempt by private launch firm OneSpace, which ended in failure. It follows the failure of commercial counterpart Landspace to reach orbit in October 2018. The next attempt from the nascent Chinese private launch sector is expected from iSpace in early June.


 

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Look at the pathetic mentality of Chinese. Couple of days back when their rocket lift off, they mocked India by following picture. Fire or Chinese rocket vs Indian funeral fire.

1620302914632.png


Paper dragon got instant justice. Their rocket part is falling on earth. May hit any population area.
 

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China to continue world-leading launch rate in 2020



There have been 29 Chinese launches so far in 2019, including two failures. With at least three more attempts to follow, China seems set to finish well ahead of second-placed United States, currently with 23 launches including Electron launches from New Zealand.


China however still trails both the United States and Russia in terms of mass sent to orbit per year. And while China is currently launching the most rockets globally, the United States could see expanded activity next year, with SpaceX planning 24 Starlink launches alone for 2020.
 

rockdog

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China Set To Beat US, Russia Again In Space Launch Race


1620322686945.png


Through the third quarter of 2020, China has launched a total of 29 satellites. (We added up the totals using Bryce’s first, second and new third quarter reports.) In the third quarter alone, China launched 14 sats.


Guess how many India did in 2020? ^_^
 

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China Set To Beat US, Russia Again In Space Launch Race


View attachment 88367

Through the third quarter of 2020, China has launched a total of 29 satellites. (We added up the totals using Bryce’s first, second and new third quarter reports.) In the third quarter alone, China launched 14 sats.


Guess how many India did in 2020? ^_^
with 1.8bn budget ISRO already had 7 launches/year ,2020 covid delay stopped launches
with the budget of CNSA ISRO can beat em in both launches and mission
 

rockdog

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with 1.8bn budget ISRO already had 7 launches/year ,2020 covid delay stopped launches
with the budget of CNSA ISRO can beat em in both launches and mission
From my POV, if the number of launches is over 10, it's not that important you are 100% or 90%.
Check how many times failed recently of SpaceX ... China also are testing lots of new rockets...

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s002wjh

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So chinese rocket has continued its pathetic record. In last 2 to 3 years, their 3 so called heavy lift rockets have failed. One more is coming back to earth to hit anywhere. Any goods of China has as much reliability as Xin ping's commitment on human right.
did you really read the article at all? the 5B purpose was lift the space module, and it succeed in that. China didn't design the rocket as control re-entry vehicle at all. Once it done its job, then there is no use for it. it was meant to fall at some point. though, china probably should design it, so it can control it to fall into ocean.
 

s002wjh

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Look at the pathetic mentality of Chinese. Couple of days back when their rocket lift off, they mocked India by following picture. Fire or Chinese rocket vs Indian funeral fire.



Paper dragon got instant justice. Their rocket part is falling on earth. May hit any population area.
you should read a bit more. the rocket was design to lift the space module in orbit, it done its job. once thats done, it become space debris, and will fall back. China just didn't design it so it can have control falling into oceans.
 

HariPrasad-1

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China Set To Beat US, Russia Again In Space Launch Race


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Through the third quarter of 2020, China has launched a total of 29 satellites. (We added up the totals using Bryce’s first, second and new third quarter reports.) In the third quarter alone, China launched 14 sats.


Guess how many India did in 2020? ^_^
We launched 104 in 1 launch.
 

HitmanBlood

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did you really read the article at all? the 5B purpose was lift the space module, and it succeed in that. China didn't design the rocket as control re-entry vehicle at all. Once it done its job, then there is no use for it. it was meant to fall at some point. though, china probably should design it, so it can control it to fall into ocean.
They should've thought that before launching. I don't remember any out of control Indian rocket falling on human population.

I knew, they were quite small...

Like bag of potatoes ...
??????? How is that a problem??????



CCP is rouge regime who doesn't care about human lives as shown during Tiananmen genocide. As power of CCP grows because of greedy capitalists and crazy leftist sympathizers in west we will see more and more such destructive events on global level. Coronavirus, this faulling rocket are just a start. In future CCP will unleash lot of hell on humanity.
 

HariPrasad-1

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From my POV, if the number of launches is over 10, it's not that important you are 100% or 90%.
Check how many times failed recently of SpaceX ... China also are testing lots of new rockets...

2019-2011

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Don't compare Chinese launches with space X launches because Slace X launches try something new like they try reusable rocket launch stage etc. They tried many cryogenic engine in one stage to boost the xapabites. Chinese even don't have one third lifting capabilities compared to space X rockets. China claims that they have launch this many satellite and this many rockets etc. still nobody trust Chinese rocket for the launch. While the India launches the satellite of whole world including US, France, Israel Middle East , Korea etc. If a new player when enter the competition it may have failure , however it is very pathetic to see an established space agency which launches so many Rockets in a year encounter such frequent failures. Like Russian space agency is unreliable after so many launches, Chinese space agency will remain unreliable space agency no matter how many launches they do. After all it is a Chinese quality. Claim vs reality is an Issue. Chinese think that quality is the quantity.
 

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