New Assault Rifles for Indian Army

Which Contender`s Rifle has more chances of winning than others?


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Raj Malhotra

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Is JVPC viable as a CQB weapon ? I remember seeing a poster from defence expo which showed JVPC Alpha. Is it some upgraded/ improved version ? Carbine requirement is around 200000 units.

JVPC is an equivalent to or replacement of 9mm SMG. It's just a better pistol woth butt or more of a Police Weapon. It's not a CQB for Military action but more of Self Defense Carbine

Military now uses 5.56x45, 7.62x39, 5.45x39 for CQB as these weapons have become lighter & are way more powerful
 

Kchontha

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A plethora of assault rifles, sniper rifles and carbines of different calibres have been made by different private or public sector companies in india but without any order from the main consumer indian army, I fear they are heading punj loyd way and unfair and unhealthy competition among them. But instead of multiple OEMs for a single weapons system such as assault/battle rifle, carbines, snipers rifles etc MOD / indian army should work in sync with only one or two OEMs as done in other countries like soko, USA, south africa, japan, UAE, china, Russia etc.
 

WolfPack86

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Final Contract for AK-203 Assault Rifle Set to Be Finalised Shortly - Top Indian Defence Official
Russian assault rifles will replace the country’s home-made and outdated INSAS rifle. The Indian Army has previously made several attempts to replace the rifle but failed.

India and Russia are set to sign the final commercial contract for the purchase of the AK-203 assault rifle soon with all price issues now finalised, according to an Indian Army official.

“Most of the contentious issues are resolved. We will decide on price bid very shortly,” the official who wished to remain unidentified told Sputnik on Thursday.
Indo-Russia Rifles Limited, established between the Ordnance Factory Board (OFB), the Kalashnikov Concern and Rosoboronexport — the Russian state agency for military exports — will manufacture the 7.62×39 mm Russian weapon at the Korwa Ordnance Factory in Uttar Pradesh. Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi inaugurated the facility last March.


The official said the infantry division has identified a total requirement of 670,000 AK-203 rifles for the army including 100,000 imports while the rest will be manufactured at the Indian facility.

“There will be certain numbers which will come as semi knocked down kits and subsequently we will looking at developing weapons here in India both for the indigenous requirement within India as also with the capability to export them subsequently,” Major General J.S. Sandhu, chief of Infantry, Indian Army, said.
Sandhu said there is a transfer of technology incorporated in the deal and it is expected that a large part of the requirement will be fulfilled by manufacturing rifles in India.

Each rifle is expected to cost around $1,100 which includes the cost of technology transfer and of setting up the manufacturing unit.

Last March, Modi said the AK-203 rifles will help the country's security forces fight militants in counter-terror operations.

The AK-203 is the latest and most advanced version of the AK-47 rifle which will replace INSAS. Indian security personnel had often complained in the past of jamming, magazine cracking etc. at higher altitudes in the Himalayas.
 

WolfPack86

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Amethi AK-203 factory unlikely to start operations in 2020

The Indo-Russian plan to make assault rifles in Amethi has missed another key milestone over differences in pricing and the travel ban imposed due to the Covid-19 pandemic, making it highly unlikely for the factory to start operations this year. As per the plan, the OFB-Kalashnikov joint venture (JV) was to arrive at a fair price for setting up and producing almost seven lakh rifles by May-end. This decision was crucial as official plans were in place to commence work at the factory by this year-end.

However, sources said that the project has hit a roadblock now and with a resolution unlikely soon, the factory is not expected to start operations this year. A fresh price bid was to be submitted but commercial terms could not be agreed upon, given the complex nature of the project that involves complete transfer of technology and building the rifles completely in India for the armed forces as well as possible exports in the future.

Besides its political significance, the factory is expected to generate at least 200 new jobs, including those of specialists and would be geared to produce over 70,000 AK 203 rifles annually. It is also expected to foster a larger ecosystem of suppliers as several components are to be outsourced to MSMEs in Uttar Pradesh as part of the Defence corridor plan.

While negotiations are to continue, there are examples of Indo-Russian collaborative projects that have failed to take off even after agreements were signed at the highest levels. The plan to jointly develop a fifth generation fighter aircraft, for example, was shelved after years of work after the Air Force did not give a go ahead. Similarly, discussions have been on for five years to set up a factory to produce Kamov KA 226T light utility helicopters in India but the project has not moved to the contract signing stage.

The OFB is itself going through a churn after the government announced that it would be restructured and corporatised in the coming months, as part of a larger set of reforms for the defence manufacturing sector.

The stalemate is symptomatic of the larger issue that plagues Make in India –– the setting up of new weapons facilities is cost intensive, pushing up the cost of domestically manufactured arms and making them more expensive than direct imports. However, these costs can be brought down in the long run by mass production and pursuing export opportunities.

The order to manufacture a record 670,00 Kalashnikov AK 203 rifles for the Indian Army has been under discussions for over a year now. The joint project is a high priority for both nations, with Prime Minister Modi and President Vladimir Putin known to have taken a personal initiative to take it ahead at the earliest.

The number is likely to increase to at least 750,000 later as requirements of other forces are added to the order. According to the plan, complete transfer of technology of all components will be achieved during the early stage of production. These rifles will replace the INSAS assault rifles currently in service.
 

WolfPack86

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It's bound happen in i know this Russian increased cost of rifle. Indian army should ordered trichy assault rifle.
 

WolfPack86

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Amethi AK-203 factory unlikely to start operations in 2020
The Indo-Russian plan to make assault rifles in Amethi has missed another key milestone over differences in pricing and the travel ban imposed due to the Covid-19 pandemic, making it highly unlikely for the factory to start operations this year.

As per the plan, the OFB-Kalashnikov joint venture (JV) was to arrive at a fair price for setting up and producing almost seven lakh rifles by May-end. This decision was crucial as official plans were in place to commence work at the factory by this year-end.

However, sources said that the project has hit a roadblock now and with a resolution unlikely soon, the factory is not expected to start operations this year. A fresh price bid was to be submitted but commercial terms could not be agreed upon, given the complex nature of the project that involves complete transfer of technology and building the rifles completely in India for the armed forces as well as possible exports in the future.


Besides its political significance, the factory is expected to generate at least 200 new jobs, including those of specialists and would be geared to produce over 70,000 AK 203 rifles annually. It is also expected to foster a larger ecosystem of suppliers as several components are to be outsourced to MSMEs in Uttar Pradesh as part of the Defence corridor plan.

While negotiations are to continue, there are examples of Indo-Russian collaborative projects that have failed to take off even after agreements were signed at the highest levels. The plan to jointly develop a fifth generation fighter aircraft, for example, was shelved after years of work after the Air Force did not give a go ahead. Similarly, discussions have been on for five years to set up a factory to produce Kamov KA 226T light utility helicopters in India but the project has not moved to the contract signing stage.

The OFB is itself going through a churn after the government announced that it would be restructured and corporatised in the coming months, as part of a larger set of reforms for the defence manufacturing sector.

The stalemate is symptomatic of the larger issue that plagues Make in India –– the setting up of new weapons facilities is cost intensive, pushing up the cost of domestically manufactured arms and making them more expensive than direct imports. However, these costs can be brought down in the long run by mass production and pursuing export opportunities.

The order to manufacture a record 670,00 Kalashnikov AK 203 rifles for the Indian Army has been under discussions for over a year now. The joint project is a high priority for both nations, with Prime Minister Modi and President Vladimir Putin known to have taken a personal initiative to take it ahead at the earliest.

The number is likely to increase to at least 750,000 later as requirements of other forces are added to the order. According to the plan, complete transfer of technology of all components will be achieved during the early stage of production. These rifles will replace the INSAS assault rifles currently in service.
 

WolfPack86

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Amethi AK-203 factory unlikely to start operations in 2020. Assault Rifle project misses key milestones over disagreement on pricing OFB/Kalashnikov unable to sort out issues Indo-Russian examples (of frustration) in past include FGFA and Ka 226 T.
 

WolfPack86

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Future Rifle of Indian Army | भारतीय सेना की राइफल | AK203 | Sig 716
 

WolfPack86

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Amethi rifle factory deadlock likely to be resolved, costing panel set up
The deadlock over starting the Amethi rifle factory to manufacture 6.7 lakh AK 203 assault rifles is likely to be resolved, with the defence ministry stepping in by setting up a costing committee to take the project forward.

The price bid for the ₹4,300-crore project has been submitted and the committee has been given two months to reach an agreeable price for the project. As reported by ET, the project has been stalled for over a year as Russian partner Kalashnikov and the Indian Ordnance Factory Board (OFB) could not present a reasonable pricing plan.

Sources said that if the costing committee works as planned, the factory could get commissioned by October this year, ahead of a planned bilateral summit between Russia and India. The project has high priority on the bilateral agenda since an inter-governmental agreement was signed in January last year.

While the bid submission was initially slated for June 2019, the OFB sought 3-4 extensions of the same, until November 2019. At the latter’s request, the DAC also added a Price Variation clause hoping that this would help bring down the price of the rifles.

A separate quote was sought for the initial 1.2 lakh rifles and for another 70,000 rifles which were to be 100% indigenously manufactured –– the latter would form the base price under the Price Variation formula for the remaining 4.8 lakh rifles.


The joint venture sought four extensions to submit the bid, which finally came in February 2020. However, on examination, the price bid was much higher than the benchmark, considering the cost of such rifles manufactured by OFB as well as imports.

It was felt that this was unreasonable and not acceptable and the OFB was nudged to submit a more reasonable offer, which did not happen. Because of the national importance of the project and the inordinate delay over it, provisions from the Defence Procurement Policy 2016 have been invoked now to finalise it expeditiously.

Accordingly, a costing committee was set up to fix a fair price for the manufacture of the rifles –– its basic version ––keeping in mind the 100% indigenisation cost of Indian components.
 

WolfPack86

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Amethi rifle factory deadlock likely to be resolved, costing panel set up
The deadlock over starting the Amethi rifle factory to manufacture 6.7 lakh AK 203 assault rifles is likely to be resolved, with the defence ministry stepping in by setting up a costing committee to take the project forward.

The price bid for the ₹4,300-crore project has been submitted and the committee has been given two months to reach an agreeable price for the project. As reported by ET, the project has been stalled for over a year as Russian partner Kalashnikov and the Indian Ordnance Factory Board (OFB) could not present a reasonable pricing plan.

Sources said that if the costing committee works as planned, the factory could get commissioned by October this year, ahead of a planned bilateral summit between Russia and India. The project has high priority on the bilateral agenda since an inter-governmental agreement was signed in January last year.


While the bid submission was initially slated for June 2019, the OFB sought 3-4 extensions of the same, until November 2019. At the latter’s request, the DAC also added a Price Variation clause hoping that this would help bring down the price of the rifles.

A separate quote was sought for the initial 1.2 lakh rifles and for another 70,000 rifles which were to be 100% indigenously manufactured –– the latter would form the base price under the Price Variation formula for the remaining 4.8 lakh rifles.

The joint venture sought four extensions to submit the bid, which finally came in February 2020. However, on examination, the price bid was much higher than the benchmark, considering the cost of such rifles manufactured by OFB as well as imports.

It was felt that this was unreasonable and not acceptable and the OFB was nudged to submit a more reasonable offer, which did not happen. Because of the national importance of the project and the inordinate delay over it, provisions from the Defence Procurement Policy 2016 have been invoked now to finalise it expeditiously.

Accordingly, a costing committee was set up to fix a fair price for the manufacture of the rifles –– its basic version ––keeping in mind the 100% indigenisation cost of Indian components.
 

Karthi

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vbk-ak-203-1.jpeg




Desi Kalashnikov misses its price target.

At a time when Indian soldiers need new modern rifles due to heightened border tensions with both China and Pakistan, the much-touted project to make the iconic Kalashnikov assault rifles in India has run into rough weather yet again. The defence ministry (MoD) earlier this month was forced to appoint a costing committee due to the “unreasonable and unacceptable” price quoted by the Indo-Russia joint venture to make 6.71 lakh AK-203 rifles, a derivative of the famous AK-47, at Korwa ordnance factory in Amethi district of Uttar Pradesh.

Sources said defence minister Rajnath Singh discussed pending issues in the rifle project during his ongoing visit to Russia, where he met Russian deputy prime minister Yury Borisov and defence minister General Sergei Shoigu on Tuesday. The five-member costing committee, set up by the MoD on June 11 by invoking a special clause of the Defence Procurement Procedure, has been asked to fix a “reasonable price” for manufacturing the basic version of the 7.62×39 mm calibre AK-203 rifle. The joint venture IRRPL between the Indian Ordnance Factory Board (OFB) and Russian Rosonboronexport and Kalashnikov company, which was set up in February 2019, will have to perforce share pricing and other data with the costing committee.

“The contract would have been inked by now if the OFB through the JV had submitted a proper bid. The manufacturing process for the urgently-required rifles would have begun in this project of national importance. But now, it has been inordinately delayed,” said a source. The Defence Acquisitions Council headed by the defence minister had granted “acceptance of necessity” (AoN) to procure the 6,71,427 AK-203 rifles at an estimated price of Rs 4,358 crore way back in January 2019. “But the JV first sought repeated extensions to submit its techno-commercial bid and then when it did in February this year, it quoted a price much higher than the benchmark price,” said the source.

Moreover, in a bid to reduce the price of the rifles at the JV’s request, the MoD had approved the incorporation of a price variation clause as well acceptance of corporate guarantee or indemnity bond in lieu of bank guarantees. Separate quotes for the initial 1.2 lakh rifles and the rest 5.5 lakh guns to be made indigenously were also sought. But the OFB quoted a very high price as compared to the 5.56mm INSAS (Indian small arms system) and 7.62mm Trichy assault rifles it manufactures.

The committee, which has to submit its report in two months, will also determine the manufacturing cost of the AK-203 rifle after 100% indigenisation. It will also take into consideration the 2019 prices at which the OFB has manufactured the INSAS and Trichy assault rifles. The AK-203 rifle project, headed by a serving majorgeneral, was supposed to be a boost for the over 14-lakh strong armed forces, which have been demanding new assault rifles for over 15 years to replace the existing glitchprone INSAS rifles. Army troops deployed on the frontline are now getting a limited quantity of just 72,400 new 7.62x51mm assault rifles with “a longer kill range” from the US firm SiG Sauer under the fast-track procurement route under the Rs 647 crore contract inked in February last year. But the bulk of requirement was to be met through the AK-203 rifles, which have “an effective range” of 300metre, and the armed forces are still waiting for the project to kick off.
 

WARREN SS

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View attachment 51263



Desi Kalashnikov misses its price target.

At a time when Indian soldiers need new modern rifles due to heightened border tensions with both China and Pakistan, the much-touted project to make the iconic Kalashnikov assault rifles in India has run into rough weather yet again. The defence ministry (MoD) earlier this month was forced to appoint a costing committee due to the “unreasonable and unacceptable” price quoted by the Indo-Russia joint venture to make 6.71 lakh AK-203 rifles, a derivative of the famous AK-47, at Korwa ordnance factory in Amethi district of Uttar Pradesh.

Sources said defence minister Rajnath Singh discussed pending issues in the rifle project during his ongoing visit to Russia, where he met Russian deputy prime minister Yury Borisov and defence minister General Sergei Shoigu on Tuesday. The five-member costing committee, set up by the MoD on June 11 by invoking a special clause of the Defence Procurement Procedure, has been asked to fix a “reasonable price” for manufacturing the basic version of the 7.62×39 mm calibre AK-203 rifle. The joint venture IRRPL between the Indian Ordnance Factory Board (OFB) and Russian Rosonboronexport and Kalashnikov company, which was set up in February 2019, will have to perforce share pricing and other data with the costing committee.

“The contract would have been inked by now if the OFB through the JV had submitted a proper bid. The manufacturing process for the urgently-required rifles would have begun in this project of national importance. But now, it has been inordinately delayed,” said a source. The Defence Acquisitions Council headed by the defence minister had granted “acceptance of necessity” (AoN) to procure the 6,71,427 AK-203 rifles at an estimated price of Rs 4,358 crore way back in January 2019. “But the JV first sought repeated extensions to submit its techno-commercial bid and then when it did in February this year, it quoted a price much higher than the benchmark price,” said the source.

Moreover, in a bid to reduce the price of the rifles at the JV’s request, the MoD had approved the incorporation of a price variation clause as well acceptance of corporate guarantee or indemnity bond in lieu of bank guarantees. Separate quotes for the initial 1.2 lakh rifles and the rest 5.5 lakh guns to be made indigenously were also sought. But the OFB quoted a very high price as compared to the 5.56mm INSAS (Indian small arms system) and 7.62mm Trichy assault rifles it manufactures.

The committee, which has to submit its report in two months, will also determine the manufacturing cost of the AK-203 rifle after 100% indigenisation. It will also take into consideration the 2019 prices at which the OFB has manufactured the INSAS and Trichy assault rifles. The AK-203 rifle project, headed by a serving majorgeneral, was supposed to be a boost for the over 14-lakh strong armed forces, which have been demanding new assault rifles for over 15 years to replace the existing glitchprone INSAS rifles. Army troops deployed on the frontline are now getting a limited quantity of just 72,400 new 7.62x51mm assault rifles with “a longer kill range” from the US firm SiG Sauer under the fast-track procurement route under the Rs 647 crore contract inked in February last year. But the bulk of requirement was to be met through the AK-203 rifles, which have “an effective range” of 300metre, and the armed forces are still waiting for the project to kick off.
Base Price Sig 716 i is 1000 $

AK-203 1200 $

Then People say Vodka brothers don't Leech Us
 

WARREN SS

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Lancer

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India should've considered a massive package deal (maybe with the Israelis) to carry out mass local production of a family of firearms - with a decent quality standard issue rifle for most of the infantrymen.

It would have made more sense than these piecemeal purchases, and would've been less of a maintenance headache in the long run as well.
 

doreamon

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SSS defence assult rifle looks promising . its a indian company

20200207_122303.jpg




 

vampyrbladez

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So now OFB has to be FORCED to quote 'reasonable' prices under DPP 2016. This seems treasonous to me! The three unions are the root cause of this!
 

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