Indian Navy Developments & Discussions

nrj

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Indian Navy employee held for spying for Pakistan - India - The Times of India

NEW DELHI: An employee of the Indian Navy has been arrested on charges of spying for Pakistan and police claimed to have recovered from him some "secret and sensitive" documents like photograph of the Hindan Air Base and map of Meerut Cantonment.

24-year-old Chand Kumar Prasad, posted in the Navy's Aircraft Maintenance Unit in Mumbai, was arrested by Delhi Police's Special Cell from New Delhi Railway Station yesterday, police sources said.

He was allegedly passing on classified information to a Pakistan High Commission official through another person, they said.

Police sources said certain "secret and sensitive" documents like photograph of Hindan Air Base and map of Meerut Cantonment were recovered from Prasad.

He was produced before a magistrate today and was remanded to five-day police custody.

What a shame!
These cases are increasing day by day or Indian Intelligence got better?
 

RPK

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http://sify.com/news/three-somalis-arrested-in-lakshadweep-news-national-kf2rkdgfehf.html

Three Somalis arrested in Lakshadweep


Three Somalis were found in an unconscious state on Minicoy island in Lakshadweep after swimming ashore from their boat, an Indian Navy official said Friday. All three have been arrested.

'The men were exhausted and dehydrated. They had managed to swim ashore after abandoning their boat. It is also learnt that a fourth man drowned,' a navy spokesman said.

An abandoned boat has been found in the Arabian sea near the island, he said. The three were found Thursday evening and were taken to a hospital.

The spokesman said the navy, the Coast Guard and police combed the waters around Lakshadweep Thursday evening after a suspicious boat was spotted around five kilometres off Minicoy island.

Minocpy is the southernmost island off Lakshwadeep.

'Subsequently, three Somalian nationals were discovered in an unconscious state. The men had managed to swim ashore after abandoning their boat,' the spokesman said.

A detailed interrogation of the three men would be conducted to ascertain their identity after they regain their health, he said.
 

RAM

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Private vessels will patrol Mumbai coast

Mumbai: The Indian Navy has decided to charter private vessels on a priority basis to tide over the shortage of patrol boats to secure the Mumbai coast from intruders. The move follows the heightened need for surveillance on the Indian waters after the 26/11 attacks combined with the delay in delivery of interceptor craft by naval shipyards.The flag officer commanding (Maharashtra and Gujarat naval area) has invited bids for seven fast interceptor craft (FIC). Two of these would be inducted by September and the remaining five by the end of October this year.Sources in the navy told DNA that the high speed interceptor boats would be deployed along the Mumbai coast to supplement naval vessels already patrolling the high seas.

The suppliers of the vessels would be required to provide the crew and be responsible for keeping the boats in perfect operational readiness. The surveillance men would, however, be from the Indian Navy.
"The priority for us is to secure the seas around Mumbai and Maharashtra. Private boats will be used by the navy for security patrolling till the time we receive our own interceptor boats," said captain Manohar Nambiar, spokesperson for the Indian Navy.


http://www.dnaindia.com/mumbai/report_private-vessels-will-patrol-mumbai-coast_1389211
 

RAM

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98 Naval Cadets Pass Out

Ninety-eight officer Cadets, including 13 Assistant Commandants, from the Coast Guard successfully completed their basic afloat training on board the First Training Squadron, comprising Indian Naval Ships Tir, Krishna, Tarangini and Indian Coast Guard Ship Varuna.

The Passing out Parade held on-board INS Tir at the Naval Base this morning was reviewed by Vice Admiral K N Sushil Flag Officer Commanding in Chief Southern Naval Command.

The First Training Squadron, commanded by Captain G Prakash, conducts the 24 weeks of strenuous sea training which commenced on December 15 last.During the period,cadets were exposed to various facets of seafaring and life on-board warships.The curriculum also included port calls to all the Indian ports on the West and East Coast as well as to the island territories, a Naval press release said.

The cadets also visited Yangon (Myanmar) and Phuket (Thailand) and they interacted with their counterparts in these countries and visited their training institutions/ academies.

The Vice Admiral reminded the Cadets about providing 'mature and courageous' leadership to the men whom they would command in addition to inculcating rigorous professional ethos.

Cadet Ravikant Tiwari was awarded the coveted 'Chief of the Naval Staff trophy' and 'Binoculars' for standing 'First in Overall Order of Merit'. Cadet Ravikant Tiwari also received the 'Telescope' for the 'Best All Round Cadet. Cadet AK Singh was awarded the 'FOC-in-C South Rolling Trophy' for the Best Sportsman.

Assistant Commandant Shanta Kumar was awarded the trophy for standing first in the Order of Merit from the Coast Guard. The cadets will now join frontline warships of the Western and Eastern Fleets and Coast Guard ships as Midshipmen for further training.

Senior Naval Officers as well as parents and relatives of the cadets who had arrived at Kochi from various parts of the country witnessed the ceremony.

http://news.outlookindia.com/item.aspx?683626
 

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India's Future Aircraft Carrier Force

India's Future Aircraft Carrier Force and the Need for Strategic Flexibility

A Three Carrier Fleet by 2020



India has long striven for a three carrier fleet comprised of one carrier battle group stationed on each seaboard, and a third carrier held in reserve. This would enable Delhi, by rotating ships, to continuously protect both its flanks, since aircraft carriers regularly require long periods of maintenance at berth. The struggles and travails that the Indian Navy has encountered while doggedly pursuing this goal, what with the seemingly interminable negotiations surrounding the purchase and modernization of the ex-Admiral Gorshkov, and the chronic delays in construction of the IAC, or indigenous aircraft carrier, have become somewhat emblematic of the sometimes frustratingly ponderous rhythm of India's naval expansion.

It would seem now, however, that Delhi's long-sought quest for a three carrier force is at last edging towards fruition. Indeed, it was announced earlier this year, shortly before Prime Minister Vladimir Putin's visit, that a price finalization for the future Vikramaditya had finally been reached. The 44,500 ton ex-Soviet vessel, which is undergoing an extensive modernization, (70 per cent of the structure will be completely renewed) will carry 16 new MiG-29K aircraft, as well as an assortment of Kamov-28 and Kamov-31 helicopters. Now that the price has been finalized, the Vikramaditya is expected to arrive in late 2012 or early 2013.

It will be joined, hopefully little more than a year later, by India's first indigenously built aircraft carrier, a 37,000 ton ship, which, like the Vikramaditya, will be equipped with a STOBAR (short-takeoff, barrier-arrested design) and is slated to field a slightly smaller air wing of 12 MiG-29K Aircraft. Both aircraft carriers will also in time carry India's indigenously designed LCA, or light combat aircraft. The IAC project, which will embody a significant milestone in India's shipbuilding capacities once completed, has been plagued by difficulties from the outset, be it due to budget-related quibbling over its tonnage, insufficient quantities of high quality steel for the hull, or, some say, Cochin Shipyard Limited's struggle to adopt a modern modular assembling technique to speed up construction. Recent reports, however, seem to indicate that the IAC is back on track, and that there is a good chance that it will be launched later this year, and commissioned in 2014/2015.

Following its launch, the Indian Navy is expected to officially out its plans for a second home-built aircraft carrier, the ubiquitously named IAC-II, which will be both larger and more formidable than its predecessor. Details surrounding the vessel were long murky at best, but information has now begun to surface, although many aspects remain somewhat sketchy. The Chief of Naval Staff, Admiral Nirmal Verma, indicated in December 2009 that the IAC-II would be sizeably larger than the IAC-I, with a displacement of 50,000 tons.1 It would also have a more modern launch system, either via steam catapult or, as some as yet unconfirmed rumours have suggested, an EMALS (Electromagnetic Aircraft System). It is also unclear whether the carrier will be conventionally or nuclear-propelled. In any case, its larger size and more efficient launch system will enable it to field an aircraft wing that is superior both in size and diversity. An RFI (Request for Information) has thus been issued for 40 new multi-role fighters. It is hoped that Cochin Shipyard, having already run through all the hoops while constructing the first IAC, will be able to deliver the second carrier with greater alacrity. If this is indeed the case, one can fully expect the Indian Navy to boast three operational carrier groups by 2020 at the latest.

What would be the strategic ramifications of such a quantum leap in India's naval capabilities? Over the years so much time and energy has been devoted to the pursuit of this "constabulary" blue-water force,2 that scant attention has actually been paid to the tactical options and possibilities proffered by India's new carrier fleet. Here follows an attempt to briefly summarize the panorama of uses India's carrier force could serve in future contingencies, be they wartime or during peace, as well as the need to protect what some sceptics have termed the "white elephants" of modern naval warfare.

Strengthening the Elephant's Hide: Protecting India's Aircraft Carriers

An aircraft carrier is undoubtedly one of the most potent symbols of national power. This symbolic potency, however, can rapidly morph into a disadvantage, if the fear of its loss irreversibly damaging the nation's morale prevents it from fulfilling its full spectrum of wartime capabilities. In the past, an unsavoury blend of political indecisiveness and inappropriate threat assessments have frequently stunted Indian aircraft carriers' tactical flexibility in times of conflict. During Operation Vijay, for example, which was conducted in 1961 to successfully wrest Goa from Portugal, the INS Vikrant was instructed to keep clear of the embattled enclave when a foreign submarine was detected. Similarly, in 1965, fears related to the INS Vikrant's severe deficiencies in terms of anti-submarine warfare played a part in the decision to maintain her under refit.3 In 1971, the Vikrant was able to operate relatively unimpeded off the Bay of Bengal only because the Pakistani submarine PNS Ghazi had already been sunk. In 2002-2003, during Operation Parakram, the INS Viraat was hastily retrofitted with the Israeli Barak Anti-Missile System once it dawned on Naval Headquarters that it would be particularly vulnerable to submarine-launched Harpoon missiles.4

The most recent existential threat to India's carrier force takes the form of China's newly inducted anti-ship ballistic missile, the DF-21, which can reportedly hit a moving target while travelling at a speed of Mach 10. Whereas before it would have been extremely difficult to locate and target a fast-moving carrier, China's progress in the field of ISR, notably via satellite surveillance, has rendered such a feat increasingly possible. It would seem, however, that the Indian Navy is determined to break a historical pattern of being more reactive than proactive when it comes to dealing with threats to its carriers, and it was recently reported that Lockheed Martin had held talks with Indian authorities regarding a potential collaboration with the DRDO, which would result in an integration of the future Prithvi Air Defence Shield (PADS) with the firm's celebrated phased array AEGIS missile defence system.5 Although it is not yet certain whether the AEGIS system could ward off a DF-21 strike, it would certainly provide the Indian fleet with a greater degree of anti-missile protection. An abiding concern however remains the prohibitive cost of such a system, as it is estimated that equipping a Kolkata class destroyer with an AEGIS defence system would more than triple its cost.

Preparing for Diverse Combat Contingencies

India's Maritime Strategy lays out a wide gamut of roles for the Indian Navy in times of war. It is stated, for example, that it will be expected to perform operations ranging from "distant credible sea denial over large areas of the Indian Ocean" to "distant sea control in selected areas of the Indian Ocean to protect economic interests and mercantile traffic," to conducting "phased operations" which will result in the use of maritime power to support land or air-borne strikes.6 India's carrier fleet will therefore have to display a high degree of tactical flexibility. This can be accomplished in part by reconfiguring the vessels' air wings depending on the nature of the crisis at hand. A flotilla of Chinese submarines could be met by an eastern carrier fleet more heavily geared towards anti-submarine warfare, with a flight deck comprising a greater number of maritime patrol aircraft or Seaking and Kamov ASW helicopters. An anti-piracy operation in a large body of water may require less strike aircraft and more maritime surveillance capabilities in the shape of patrol aircraft or UAVs. MARCOS commando strikes could be facilitated by increasing the number of helicopters aboard, or by adding specific Special Forces ammunition and equipment modules on board.

In the course of the next two to three decades, China's string of pearls, which is still very much in its embryonic phase for the time being, may gradually take on a more decidedly military nature. This would require Indian naval practitioners to develop a capacity for opposed amphibious landings. The fleet's amphibious component has received a considerable boost over the past few years with the induction of the 17,000 ton INS Jalashwa in 2007, as well several smaller landing ships. Direct amphibious assaults may become less feasible in time, however, as the gradual proliferation of medium and long-range anti-ship missiles renders landing craft ever more vulnerable to a devastating hit which would obliterate not only the ship but also the precious amphibious strike force it hosts.7 Aircraft carriers can play an important role by providing a first over-the-horizon attack, either by air strike or by the air-borne insertion of special forces. This would serve to isolate and soften up the beachhead before engaging in a full heliborne assault, supplemented by the landing craft and LSTs ferrying in reinforcements.

Vital Humanitarian Platforms

Aircraft carriers can prove to be extremely valuable assets when responding to humanitarian emergencies or engaging in NEOs (non-combatant evacuation operations). A carrier can provide a self-generating supply of fresh water, medical assistance or engineering expertise to populations in dire need, and have revealed themselves time and time again to be vital humanitarian platforms. The participation of the INS Viraat in the 2004 tsunami relief effort comes to mind, as does the recent action of the USS Carl Vinson off the coast of Haiti. Much can be done, nevertheless, to further bolster a carrier's humanitarian response skills.8 First, the air wing can be reconfigured in order to field more helicopters, as well as vertical lift aircraft, such as the recently upgraded Sea Harriers, which can gain access to rough terrain. Secondly, medical modular facilities can be installed on board in order to enhance the carrier's medical responsiveness. Finally, a command centre can be set up so that key government personnel and civil response teams can coordinate their efforts via the carrier's communication systems. This could be extremely useful, for example, in the event of disruption of landlines or the destruction of government offices.

Conclusion

In less than a decade, India's naval force structure will have undergone a seismic shift, able to continuously deploy carrier groups on both seaboards. In order for the Indian Navy to efficiently project both hard and soft power throughout the Indian Ocean Region, its commanders will need to display a degree of strategic flexibility by learning how to leverage the many uses of Indian's new aircraft carriers. Only this way will they prove themselves to be the formidable force multipliers, both in peace and war, required to lead the Indian Navy into the 21st century.

http://idrw.org/?p=1870#more-1870
 

nandu

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249 aspirants from Ezhimala Academy to be inducted into Navy

A total of 249 aspirants, including 36 women and 64 Coast Guard trainees, would be inducted into the Navy at a Passing Out Parade on June 5 at Ezhimala Naval Academy near Kannur.

Air Marshal VR Iyer, Air Officer Commanding-in-Chief Training Command, IAF in Bangalore, would review the parade of the 80th NAC and 10th Naval Oreientation Course and witness the stripe shipping ceremony of 187 Sub Lieutenants, a Navy release in Kozhikode said.

The training at the INA is moduled to produce all-rounded Naval and Coast Guard personnel, capable of meeting challenges in the modern day security and technology environment, it said.

The Ezhimala Naval Academy, about 25 KM from Kannur, has capacity to train 600 cadets and is in the process of enhancing it to 750 trainees.

http://www.hindustantimes.com/249-a...to-be-inducted-into-Navy/Article1-551574.aspx
 

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http://idrw.org/?p=1865

Gorshkov to be handed over to India by Dec '12BY: TNN

After closely examining the ongoing refit work on Admiral Gorshkov in Russia, the Navy is now confident the aircraft carrier will be ready for harbour trials by early-2011 to ensure it can be handed over to India by December 2012 or so.

This comes after a naval team, led by controller of warship production and acquisitions Vice-Admiral N N Kumar, recently visited Russia to examine the 44,570-tonne Gorshkov at the Sevmash Shipyard.

"There has been substantial progress since the last examination in September 2009. Around 99% of the structural work and almost 50% of the cabling work has been completed on the carrier. Almost all large-size equipment, like engines, diesel generators and the like, has been installed," said an officer.

With India earlier this year agreeing to the revised refit cost of $2.33 billion for Gorshkov, after three years of bitter wrangling since the earlier agreement inked in January 2004 had earmarked only $974 million for it, Russia has appointed a high-level apex committee to oversee the work on the carrier.

Along with the fresh Gorshkov agreement, India also inked a contract with Russia for 29 more MiG-29Ks for $1.46 billion in March this year. These fighters will be in addition to the original 16 MiG-29Ks ordered through the $1.5-billion package deal for Gorshkov signed in January 2004.

The Navy plans to deploy two carrier-battle groups (CBGs) by 2014-2015, as reported by TOI earlier. The first CBG will be centred around Gorshkov, rechristened INS Vikramaditya, while the second will be on the 40,000-tonne indigenous aircraft carrier (IAC) being constructed at the Cochin Shipyard, which Navy hopes to get by 2014.

As of now, the Navy is "stretching" the operational life of the 50-year-old 28,000-tonne INS Viraat, even though it's left with only 11 of its Sea Harrier jump-jets.
 

RAM

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PM Dedicates Pipavav Shipyard to the Nation

The Prime Minister, Dr. Manmohan Singh, dedicated Pipavav Shipyard to the nation today. Following is the text of the Prime Minister's inaugural address on the occasion:

"I am very pleased to participate in this function which marks the dedication of the Pipavav Shipyard to our nation. Some 50 years ago when I was a student at the University of Cambridge I had a very famous teacher Lord Nicolas Kaldor and he often used to say that there is no technical necessity for any social and economic system to do better than another. It all depends upon the character, the mindset and motivation of people who make all the ruling decisions of a nation's life. And what I have been told by Shri Nikhil Gandhi, I am truly impressed by the commitment to innovation, farsighted vision, commitment to do things the best possible way, commitment to get away from the chalta hai tradition which has often I think held our country back. So with these words I once again congratulate Shri Nikhil Gandhi and the management of Pipavav Shipyard for a massive contribution to nation building activities of our country.

I have often said India is destined to be a major trading nation of the world and if India is destined to be a major trading nation of the world, I think shipping, ship building and management of our ports assume great importance in our scheme of development planning. Therefore I am very happy to learn about the activities of the Pipavav Shipyard and I once again compliment and congratulate all those who are associated with this highly enterprising, innovative shipyard. I understand that the Pipavav Shipyard, which has been set up on the Saurashtra coast of Gujarat, is one of the most modern shipyards in India and I note the commitment of the management to provide our country with the best available shipyards anywhere in the world and I compliment you for this commitment. This shipyard has been developed to have one of the largest dry dock and wet dock facilities in the world, with the state-of-the-art technology which can be used for construction of vessels relating to oil, gas and defence sectors. I hope this modern facility will set new benchmarks in quality and efficiency for our country.

India is known to have a long coastline and is known also for its maritime heritage. Even today, around 95% of our foreign trade is sea borne. The development of maritime infrastructure – ports, shipbuilding, and shipping, including inland water transport, is therefore of critical importance to the progress of our economy. This sector also provides substantial employment in the organized sector, and acts as catalyst for rapid development of the hinterland as well.

Our Government has taken many steps to develop this sector and Mr Vasan has summed them up admirably. The National Maritime Development Programme (NMDP) envisages investment of more than Rs. 1 lakh crore. We have recently set up the Indian Maritime University. We have also welcomed private sector participation in major ports, to access much needed funds and technical and managerial expertise. I hope the framework that has been developed will hasten the construction of new ports, and will also improve the maintenance of existing ports and harbours. In addition measures are being undertaken to reduce connectivity constraints being faced by our ports.

The Shipbuilding industry can have a multiplier effect on economic output and also in terms of its contribution to the generation of employment. The Government of India has therefore been supporting the setting up of shipyards. I understand the National Manufacturing Competitiveness Council is working with the Ministry of Shipping to explore fresh ways to enable faster growth of this dynamic sector. In addition, we intend to take measures to greatly expand inland water transport.

I once again congratulate the management and staff of the Pipavav Shipyard as I dedicate it to our nation. I wish the Shipyard all success for the future. You have done exceedingly well. The nation is proud of your commitment to enterprise and I venture to suggest that the best is yet to come. With these words, I once again congratulate the management and the staff

http://pib.nic.in/release/release.asp?relid=62238
 

RAM

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India to discuss security ties with Seychelles

India will discuss greater security and economic cooperation with Seychelles during discussions with its President James Alex Michel who arrived here on Tuesday.
India has been implementing a more intimate security grid with island nations such as the Maldives, Mauritius and Seychelles as they have been feeling vulnerable in the absence of maritime domain awareness and adequate firepower.
During talks with Prime Minister Manmohan Singh on Wednesday, the Seychelles President will discuss greater collaboration with the Indian Navy to overcome the threat of piracy which has badly impacted its economy, Foreign Office spokesperson Vishnu Prakash told journalists.
Seychelles recently repelled two pirate attacks and has suffered a € 8 billion (over Rs. 40,000 crore) impact due to decline in tourism. Besides military hardware, India provides high-level expertise in the form of several specialists from the armed forces doing duty in Seychelles. It also trains officers from Seychelles at its military academies.
Both sides would also look to deepen their economic engagement and India is expected to reiterate its continuing support for developing the island nation's infrastructure.
Seychelles has been facing severe threat from piracy because the concentration of the world's navies around the Gulf of Aden has pushed ship hijacking activity to a wider geographical area.
http://beta.thehindu.com/news/article443874.ece
 

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Three Indian Naval Ships On Goodwill Visit To Malaysia June 20-23

KUALA LUMPUR, June 2 -- Three Indian Navy ships will be visiting Port Klang on a goodwill visit from June 20 to 23.

The visit by the INS Ranjit, INS Rana and INS Jyoti, under the command of Rear Admiral P. Murugesan, Flag Officer Commanding Eastern Fleet, was to commemorate the long friendship and maritime cooperation between the two nations, the Indian High Commission said in a statement here Wednesday.

The ships set sail from Port Blair in May as part of their eastward deployment.

The statement said Murugesan and the commanding officers would call on the local military and civil dignitaries during the ships' stay here.

Many social interactions between the two navies had also been planned, including sports, beach cleaning, community services at old folks homes and medical camps.

The ships will be open to the public for two days on June 21 and 22.

http://www.bharat-rakshak.com/NEWS/newsrf.php?newsid=12977
 

RAM

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Russia declares Nerpa lease


A day after the indigenous nuclear powered submarine, Arihant, was revealed to the world after a photograph of it was carried in the UPA's report to the people, Russia has finally made official the leasing of its advanced 'Nerpa' nuclear attack submarine to India. In the first official confirmation of the leasing of the Akula 2 class submarine, the head of the Russian Federal Service for Military-Technical Cooperation has said that the nuclear submarine will be received by India in October-November this year. While there have been several reports about the Nerpa submarine that is set to join the Indian Navy on a 10-year lease from Russia, this is the first time that Russia has acknowledged the deal.

http://www.indianexpress.com/news/Russia-declares-Nerpa-lease/628686
 

RPK

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INS Jyoti To Visit Brunei For Queen's Baton Relay | Local News


Bandar Seri Begawan - The Indian Naval Ship INS Jyoti under the command of Captain A Venugopal, NM VSM, Commanding Officer, as part of her eastward deployment will be visiting Muara Port on a goodwill visit from June 8-11.

The visit coincides with the Queen's Baton Relay which will be organised in Brunei on June 9. The sailors from the ship are expected to take part in the Queen's Baton Relay. The visit also commemorates the long friendship and maritime cooperation between the two nations, according to a press release. India and Brunei share many areas of common interest and concerns including economic co-operation, science and technology. The two navies also shares common perceptions regarding measures to fight piracy at sea, pollution control and protection of oil energy resources traversing the sea line of communication.

During the stay in Muara, the commanding officer will call on the local military and civil dignitaries. In addition many social and professional interactions between the two navies including sports fixtures have been planned. A reception will also be hosted onboard INS Jyoti on June 10 where the Queen's Baton will also be on display. The reception is expected to be attended by dignitaries from the diplomatic community, Royal Brunei Armed Forces and prominent members of the Indian community in the Sultanate. The ship will also be kept open for the public visit.

INS Jyoti, the biggest ship of the Indian Navy is an underway replenishment tanker of the Eastern Fleet. The ship is capable of embarking and transferring, 28,000 tonnes cargo comprising various grades of fuel, fresh and feed water to other fleet ships whilst underway and is commanded by Captain A Venugopal NM VSM and has a crew of 19 officers and 170 sailors. The visit by the Indian Naval Ship is part of increasing engagement between India and Brunei Armed Forces under expanding bilateral ties, spurred by His Majesty the Sultan and Yang Di-Pertuan of Brunei Darussalam.

The Indo-Brunei defence cooperation has been growing steadily and as part of growing naval interaction between the two navies, visits by high level delegation and regular visits by war ships to Brunei are taking place. Also, in the recently concluded BRIDEX-2009 the Indian Naval Ships INS Airavat and INS Khukri visited Muara Port. -- Courtesy of Borneo Bulletin
 

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Navy rescues sick Jordanian from ship off Goa


MARGAO: A Indian Navy helicopter responded to a distress call from a merchant vessel Al Hamra on Saturday morning and evacuated a sick Jordanian man on board before taking him for treatment to the Salgaocar Medical Research Centre (SMRC), Vasco.

The patient Mohamad Abdallah Ayyad was suffering from severe appendicitis on the ship which was about 80km from the Goa coast. The Indian Naval authorities swung into action immediately and a Chetak helicopter was launched from INS Hansa at 9.40am.

The crew comprised Cdr A Barkataky, Sub Lt Vinoth, LAD GS Sen and LAD Bhupinder. Since there was no place to land, the helicopter had to be manoeuvred by the pilot so as to winch up the patient. The evacuation was executed promptly and in a professional manner, despite strong winds.

The patient was brought back to INS Hansa, the naval air base, Goa, at 11.30am. He was then handed over to the shipping agents and transferred for further treatment to SMRC, informed Cmdr Mahesh Joshi, naval PRO.


http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/...ian-from-ship-off-Goa/articleshow/6016493.cms
 

RAM

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Pipavav bags Rs 2,600-cr Navy deal

AHMEDABAD: Pipavav Shipyard, the country's largest ship-building facility in the private sector, has bagged a Rs 2,600-crore contract to build offshore patrol vessels for the Indian Navy. The shipyard located in Gujarat will be constructing about five such vessels, each with a displacement of about 2,000 tonne. With the Navy order in its kitty, the company's order books have swelled to over Rs 7,000 crore.

"We have been declared as the lowest bidder by the ministry of defence (MoD) for contract to build off-shore patrol vessels (OPVs) for the Navy. This will be our maiden foray into building ships for the defence sector," said Nikhil Gandhi, group chairman, SKIL Infrastructure, the original promoters of Pipavav Shipyard (PSL), a BSE-listed company.

"These vessels will be fitted with a 76 mm gun. They will be about 110 meters in length, will have a displacement of about 2,000 tonne and will have a maximum speed of 20 knots," Mr Gandhi told ET on Friday.

http://economictimes.indiatimes.com...-Rs-2600-cr-Navy-deal/articleshow/6018029.cms
 

RAM

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New Delhi, June 7 (PTI) Looking to strengthen its surveillance capabilities and control over the maritime zone, Indian Navy is planning to procure four aircraft carrier-based Airborne Early Warning and Control (AEW&C) planes.

"We are planning to procure four carrier-based AEW&C aircraft to carry out airborne surveillance, detection and tracking of airborne and surface contacts and control air interceptions and air strikes," Navy officials told PTI here.
Navy planning to procure four AEW&C planes


At present, the Navy operates the carrier-borne Kamov-31, which were procured from Russia for early warning roles.

Using AEW&C aircraft on aircraft carriers will help in expanding the area under surveillance near the area of their deployment, they added.

"The control over the area would also be increased as the AEW&C aircraft can detect enemy fighter and maritime patrol aircraft and direct the fighter planes attached with it towards them and take them out," officials said


http://www.ptinews.com/news/698336_Navy-planning-to-procure-four-AEW-C-planes
 

nrj

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Apart from relying on USN for 72Hrs on SOS call, are there any desi DSRV efforts? We need these critical system on our own. We can not depend on US for sub rescues.
 

RAM

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Zvezdochka signed sub contract with Indian Navy

2010-06-08

The Zvezdochka yard in Severodvinsk has signed a contract with the Indian Ministry of Defence on the service and modernization of the "Sindhurakshak" diesel-powered submarine.The contract is the first ever negotiated by Zvezdochka without middlemen, Regnum reports.The Zvezdochka yard had been responsible for service of Indian subs since 1997.The "Sindhurakshak" is one of India's ten Sindhughosh-class diesel-electric submarines, an Indian variant of the Russian Kilo class subs. They were designed as part of Project 877, and built under a contract between Rosvooruzhenie and the Indian Ministry of Defence.

http://www.barentsobserver.com/zvezdochka-signed-sub-contract-with-indian-navy.4791048-116321.html
 

Patriot

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China's String of Pearls and India's Enduring Tactical AdvantageIskander Rehman

June 8, 2010



When in 2003 a team of Booz Allen consultants, in a report for the Pentagon, coined the term 'string of pearls' to describe China's attempts to gain a strategic foothold in the Indian Ocean, they were in all likelihood little aware of how rapidly their colourful image would gain currency in turn of the century geopolitical discourse. Amidst Delhi's vibrant strategic community, in particular, the expression has come to embody, occasionally more metaphorically than factually, India's innate, almost visceral fear of maritime encirclement. What, however, is the reality behind China's so-called string of pearls? And in what way does it pose such an existential threat to Indian security? It will be argued here that China's naval positioning in the Indian Ocean is not only legitimate to a certain degree, but also, paradoxically, to Delhi's tactical advantage in the event of a Sino-Indian conflict. This tactical edge can only be guaranteed, however, by the dogged pursuit of certain diplomatic and military measures.1
I. A String of Clouded Pearls

The term 'string of pearls' was coined to describe China's increasing forays into the Indian Ocean , discernible through its efforts to establish 'nodes of influence' in the region, via an assertive diplomacy primarily geared towards strengthening its economic and security ties with countries as diverse as Pakistan, Myanmar and Sri Lanka. In some cases this firming up of ties has led to joint port construction or enlargement deals, such as with Pakistan at Gwadar, or with Sri Lanka at Hambantota.2

When evoking its Indian Ocean Policy, Beijing tends to paint it in broader economic and maritime security-related terms. Increasingly dependent on foreign oil, China is to some extent a prisoner of its own geography, as it is positioned far from some of the world's most strategically salient shipping lanes, where the US and Indian Navies hold sway. It is in order to remedy this 'Malacca dilemma', argue Chinese strategists, that Beijing is compelled to venture further afield into the balmy waters of the Indian Ocean. For India, which has been entrapped in an often tension-fraught relationship with China for over half a century, China's strategy bears greater resemblance to a noose woven to encircle and constrict India within its own backyard rather than a sparkly, peace-imbued constellation of trade linkages. In short, it could be argued that both nations are imprisoned in a textbook security dilemma.

The String of Pearls has become one of the most widely commented subjects in contemporary strategic debate, despite the fact that it is also one of the most factually opaque. This paradox is especially blatant in India, where there seems to be an increasing disconnect between strategic commentary and official declarations,3 with the latter taking great pains to emphasise that China has currently no naval bases in the Indian Ocean. Regularly stories surface in the press that are subsequently disavowed or contested, ranging from the supposed presence of a Chinese submarine base at Marao in the Maldives to conflicting accounts of the extent of Chinese military presence in the Coco Islands off Burma.

What is clear, however, is that there is no compelling evidence yet to suggest that the PLAN has engaged in basing activities of an overtly military nature. Nevertheless, this does not mean that it has no future intention to do so. Chinese naval commanders have said as much, recently stating that China may also seek to obtain a base in the Gulf of Aden. The deep-sea water port of Gwadar, of which the first phase of construction has been completed, is projected to undergo militarization by the Pakistani Navy, which means that Chinese surface and sub-surface platforms could easily be stationed there. Most of the ports the PRC is helping to develop, be at Hambantota or Chittagong, can have a dual use, by hosting both merchant and military vessels. And the absence as yet of Chinese warships at berth does not mean that China is not busy conducting naval espionage be it via the alleged SIGINT facilities it is erecting in places such as the Coco Islands or via discreet hydrographic research.

It seems clear that China's string of pearls strategy is still very much in a nascent, or even embryonic, phase. If it were to take on a decidedly military nature, however, what would be the security implications for India?
II. Why China's String of Pearls will ultimately be to India's Tactical Advantage?

While many in India lament the supposed military emasculation induced by the presence of permanent Chinese bases in the region, it will be argued here that such a development would actually be to India's tactical benefit provided it takes certain preparatory measures that will be detailed later on.

The unresolved land border issue and Tibet, both of which are intrinsically linked, are the focal points of Sino-Indian tension and are likely to remain so in the future. This means that if a conflict between these rising powers does occur, it would most likely be a largely land war, most probably in the Himalayan Northeast. As of now, the Indian Navy can only be expected to play a minor role in such a conflict. With the future presence of Chinese naval bases in the region however, this could change, by providing the Indian Navy with a novel warfighting role.

A cursory review of the tactical options available to the Indian fleet in the event of a Sino-Indian war reveals the tactical flexibility on offer:
Tactical Option number 1: A strategy of commodity denial, either via sea-lane blockade or through the targeted interdiction of Chinese shipping

This option would require a long, protracted conflict in order to be effective. This effectiveness is likely to take ever longer to attain as China continues to build up its strategic oil reserves over the next decade, until it reaches its avowed goal of six months self-sufficiency.4 Furthermore, as the recent tragedy off the coast of Gaza starkly brought to light, naval blockades can be messy affairs, resulting in collateral civilian casualties. This risk would be further compounded if Chinese merchant ships started to provide their crew members with small arms to fend off Somali pirate attacks. Finally, such a blockade would severely disrupt international trade, and would put into question India's role as a responsible stakeholder in the international system.
Tactical Option number 2: An expeditionary force into the South China Sea

Not only would this escalate the conflict into a full-spectrum war, it would also result in disaster for the Indian fleet. Even if by 2020 the Indian Navy can boast two immediately deployable carrier groups, they would not be able to withstand a sustained aerial assault from Chinese fighters stationed on the mainland or on Hainan, especially when combined with a salvo of DF-21 anti-ship ballistic missiles. In addition, the Indian Navy would have to face down the rapidly expanding South China Sea Fleet, as well as the latest Jin class SSBNs and Shang Class SSNs stationed at Sanya.
Tactical Option number 3: Breaking China's String of Pearls

If one looks at a potential naval conflict between both powers in the Indian Ocean, it makes no sense to compare each force in its totality, ship for ship, missile for missile. Theatre dominance is all that matters, and in this respect India will display two unalterable advantages:

Firstly, by virtue of India's immense geographical advantages in the region, it is difficult to imagine China ever being able to wield as much military clout in the region as India can. India's natural peninsular formation means that it has been described by some as akin to an "unsinkable aircraft carrier" jutting out into the Indian Ocean. Any naval taskforce venturing into the Bay of Bengal with hostile intentions would have to contend with India's airforce and naval aviation, operating not only from the mainland, but also from the Andaman and Nicobar archipelago in the Andaman Sea, whose airstrips are currently being extended, and which is slated to eventually host Sukhoi squadrons, and possibly MiGs and Mirages.5

Secondly, China's naval presence in the region will be dispersed along the several, often distant, nodal points that constitute its string of pearls. Assuming that these forces together are superior in both quantity and quality to the Indian Navy, which is, all in all, most unlikely, India will still have the immediate advantage of force concentration and hence superiority if it decides to conduct a rapid strike at an isolated group of Chinese vessels. A direct attack on a naval base would be highly undesirable, as it would trigger a severe crisis with the hosting country. A massive naval deployment outside one such base could have the desired effect however, by compelling the Chinese to de-escalate their land assault, much as the Indian Navy's stationing of its fleet 13 nautical miles outside Karachi during the Kargil War prompted, some claim, the Pakistani Army to accelerate the withdrawal of its forces from the disputed areas.6
III. Necessary Preparatory Measures
Reinforcing the ANC

The Andaman and Nicobar Command, which was inaugurated as India's first joint command structure in 2001, is of absolutely vital strategic import. Separated from the mainland by almost 1200 kms of sea, the island chain, which lies only 18 km from the Coco Islands, constitutes India's first eastern maritime defence perimeter. It has been also been described by certain Chinese analysts as a 'metal chain' which could lock China out of the Indian Ocean.7 It goes without saying that the command will play a first-line role in the event of a Sino-Indian naval clash in the Indian Ocean. Although measures have been taken to strengthen India's force presence on the islands, most notably by enlarging airstrips for Sukhois, or by announcing the stationing of India's first full-bodied joint amphibious force and the ramping up of its existing 3000 strong 108 Mountain Brigade to a division level force of 15000 troops, the ANC is still having to making do with an assortment of fast offshore patrol vessels, LSTs and aging Dornier-228 Maritime Patrol Aircraft.8 More needs to be done to accelerate the strengthening of India's military deterrent in the Andaman Sea. This can be done by stationing one or two large warships there on a permanent basis, by setting up Brahmos cruise missile silos on some of the larger islands, and by providing the ANC with its own separate budget so that its platform acquisition efforts no longer fall victim to inter-service turf wars.
Signing an Intelligence Sharing Agreement with the US involving the sharing of maritime satellite-based surveillance

As the Chinese Navy extends its presence into the Indian Ocean and the Persian Gulf, the region will be witness to a growing strategic congruence between both Washington and Delhi in their desire to carefully monitor the PLAN's comings and goings. Both navies already share very strong ties and have begun to display an ever increasing degree of interoperability, in large part thanks to the Malabar bilateral or multilateral exercises held each spring. India and the United States have recently upgraded their intelligence sharing in the field of counter-terrorism. In future, both states may well find that the surveillance of China's naval activities in the region is an equally pressing concern.

It would be in India's interest to press for a maritime intelligence sharing agreement, which would result in the linking of India's new ocean surveillance satellite with the US's own satellite-based surveillance system. India could also offer to share radar and sonar data compiled in the Andaman Sea with US Naval Intelligence in exchange for US satellite imagery, thus gifting the Indian Navy with a bird's eye view of everything that goes on in the Indian Ocean. This would be a good stop-gap measure while waiting for India's own burgeoning satellite-based surveillance system to attain the capability of covering the entire region in real time. In order to not make the measure appear too overtly directed against China, both countries could 'sell' the initiative as being part of their larger effort to ensure maritime security in the region, and help protect maritime shipping from non-traditional threats.
Sustain and Reinforce Indian Maritime Diplomacy in the Indian Ocean Region

While much has been said of China's inroads into the Indian Ocean, India's own charm offensive in the region has also been bearing fruit over the past two to three years, whether it be through the establishment of electronic monitoring systems in Madagascar in 2007, or more recently, in August 2009, in the Maldives. Indian officials have also become more reactive to the attempt of their Chinese counterparts to woo small but strategically placed nations such as the Seychelles or Mauritius. For example, Delhi reacted to Beijing's offer of military assistance to the Seychelles by rapidly bestowing on its minute navy one of its own patrol aircraft.9 This sort of rapid, reactive diplomacy, when combined with more long-term institutionalized efforts such as the Indian Ocean Naval Symposium launched in 2008, will help sustain the strength and visibility of India's presence in the region.
Conclusion

China's so-called string of pearls strategy, the degree of advancement of which has frequently been overstated, is not likely to immediately put Indian maritime security in jeopardy. Nevertheless, there will inevitably come a time when India will have to face the reality of a Chinese naval presence in its own backyard. Beijing cannot afford for its Achilles heel, i.e. its acute vulnerability to any interruption of its overseas trade, to be bared for much longer.

Only when India's strategic community grasps that India is already squarely poised over China's energy jugular, will they be able to break with an acutely ingrained sense of vulnerability. Not only would the presence of Chinese vessels present no real existential threat to Indian naval dominance in the region, it would also, paradoxically, provide the Indian Navy with a far greater degree of tactical flexibility in the event of a future conflict with China, be it on land or at sea. This advantage can only be guaranteed, however, if India undertakes certain preparatory measures designed to effectively lock down its control of its maritime surroundings, and curb Chinese influence among certain key oceanic 'swing' states.

Finally, as China edges its way into the Indian Ocean over the course of the next few decades, both nations would do well to agree to draft a "Sino-Indian Incidents at Sea Agreement", which could be loosely modelled on the Cold-War era INCSEA, and which helped prevent routine US-Soviet naval encounters from spiralling out of control. The quest for adequate military readiness and tactical flexibility does not, after all, render the prospect of a future Sino-Indian naval conflict any less dire.






China's String of Pearls and India's Enduring Tactical Advantage
 

plugwater

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Severodvinsk shipbuilders upgrade diesel sub for India

Fifth diesel electric submarine of Indian Navy is being modernized at Zvezdochka Ship Repair Center in Severodvinsk. The corresponding contract has been signed in Delhi, said Nadezhda Scherbinina, director of the shipyard's press service.

"Contract on upgrading INS Sindurakshak is for the first time signed without intermediary of Rosoboronexport", noted the shipyard's official. "Zvezdochka shipyard enjoys the right of independent foreign economic activity given by the President of the Russian Federation", she said. Modernization of Project 877EKM submarine INS Sindurakshak (stands for Sea Giant) will take 2-2.5 years. "The sub is planned to be delivered to Severodvinsk late June", said Scherbinina.

Being specialized in overhaul and utilization of nuclear-powered submarines, Zvezdochka shipyard has upgraded four Indian diesel electric submarines. The shipyard also continues repair and modernization of similar submarine INS Sindukirti in her basing site Vishakhapatnam, India.

All these submarines are Russian-made Project 887EKM (Kilo class) developed by Rubin design bureau, St. Petersburg. They are designed for antisubmarine and antiship warfare; defense of naval bases, coastal and sea lines of communication; reconnaissance and patrol operations. Such submarines have displacement of 2,300 tons; length of 72.6 meters; submerged speed of 19 knots (about 35 kph); test depth of 300 meters; crew of 52; endurance of 45 days. Armament includes six 533-mm torpedo tubes. In the course of modernization subs are equipped with advanced Russian Club-S cruise missile system with firing range of about 200 km, Indian sonars and radio communication systems.

http://rusnavy.com/news/navy/index.php?ELEMENT_ID=9690
 

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