Indian Navy Developments & Discussions

Tanmay

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We need to expedite indigenisation of these guns (SRGM and CIWS).
We have issues with:-
  • Gyrostabilization: Similar tech available in Arjun MBT turret stabilization, leverage the experience.
  • Barrel tech.: New arty guns coming out, some technological base available, leverage the experience.
  • Recoil management: Created similar systems for state-of-the-art towed artillery, leverage the experience.
  • Feed system: Study the existing system, how hard can it be?
DRDO needs to handle this research in conjunction with BHEL R&D division. With the kinds of tech we have made, this should not be so difficult. right?
The 30mm gun seems to be a good effort if it's 100% indegenous.
We can have a good industrial base with MSME suppliers.
This can then be used to make 20mm guns too.
Heck lot of orders possible for LCH and Rudra ( currently using nexter 20mm iirc)

And the 30mm for Tata kestrel and other indegenous vehicles. ( uses BMP turret gun. Looks very unappealing with its round shape :p ) and if in future we make a Arjun based heavy IFV just like they have T-15 IFV based on T 14 armata

Ofcourse modifications will be needed for nava, AF, army variant guns. But with a good order book and the scope for a military industrial base for those, should be commenced.
If OFB has Difficulties with barrel, it can ask privates like Bharat Forge who end up buying entire assembly lines from abroad for quicker development ( which might be time consuming, Bureaucratic and difficult for OFB)
 

Adioz

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I mean if in case IN decided to go for catapult design rather than EMALS due to budget strains. And another thing what I understood is US will negotiate for EMALS only if F-35 is on table. If you agree with F-35 on table first you need to purchase 1980's F-16 and then negotiate above toys. India getting F-16 is doubt full . And F-35 is too costly for our dudes. So * F35 ko maro goli* and there goes EMALS.
I don't think the US would be that stupid. India is a big market. They have already offered the EMALS as dumping it on us would relieve them off a lot of the development costs of that technology. Their government has already indicated that it has no problems with giving this tech to India. They are not going to put it all in danger just to arm-twist us into buying a few fighters. They are a business and know that there are many other weapons we would be interested in buying from them. They are not going to make the mistake of tying up one sale with another, especially given that now Su-57 MKI is back on track and AMCA is in the works.
 

Anikastha

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I don't think the US would be that stupid. India is a big market. They have already offered the EMALS as dumping it on us would relieve them off a lot of the development costs of that technology. Their government has already indicated that it has no problems with giving this tech to India. They are not going to put it all in danger just to arm-twist us into buying a few fighters. They are a business and know that there are many other weapons we would be interested in buying from them. They are not going to make the mistake of tying up one sale with another, especially given that now Su-57 MKI is back on track and AMCA is in the works.
Thats sounds good. Seriously we need to upgrade our LPDs.
 

captscooby81

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Two things to see here US developed EMALS now they want to make some money out of it who are their potential customers ..
UK : Nope thanks we had built our last Aircraft Carrier for next 3 decades
France : Nope we are not in mood for another Carrier
Japan: Not looking to operate an Aircraft Carrier as its considered blasphemy to its constitution which talks about defence only
Korea : No thanks we don't have need a carrier our enemy is next door
Saudi: Well they still not learned to land their Jets on land without crashing still decades away from landing on Aircraft carrier

China: No thanks we already have your EMALS tech and made a Tech Demonstrator

INDIA : The country with big stomach to digest an Aircraft carrier cost with a growing economy and growing chinese threat in the IOR region will be surely ready to buy our Tech so lets sell it to INDIA .
 

darshan978

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Two things to see here US developed EMALS now they want to make some money out of it who are their potential customers ..
UK : Nope thanks we had built our last Aircraft Carrier for next 3 decades
France : Nope we are not in mood for another Carrier
Japan: Not looking to operate an Aircraft Carrier as its considered blasphemy to its constitution which talks about defence only
Korea : No thanks we don't have need a carrier our enemy is next door
Saudi: Well they still not learned to land their Jets on land without crashing still decades away from landing on Aircraft carrier

China: No thanks we already have your EMALS tech and made a Tech Demonstrator

INDIA : The country with big stomach to digest an Aircraft carrier cost with a growing economy and growing chinese threat in the IOR region will be surely ready to buy our Tech so lets sell it to INDIA .
I bet emals for export will be striped down virsion
 

aditya10r

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Indian Navy looking at more P-8I 'submarine killers': Admiral Lanba
Sunday, January 28, 2018
By: ET

Source Link: CLICK HERE



The Indian Navy is considering the acquisition of more Boeing P-8I aircraft for surveillance and Anti-Submarine Warfare (ASW), according to Navy chief Admiral Sunil Lanba.

In an interview to the magazine 'India Strategic', Admiral Lanba said that air surveillance capability is an important subset of naval operations and that while the proposal was on the table, he could not disclose the required numbers.

His predecessors have spoken of a requirement of 30 Long-Range Maritime Reconnaissance (LRMR) aircraft, under which the navy has already inducted eight aircraft and placed an order for four more.

Because of the overall tardy process of routine modernisation of the armed forces over the last 30 years, the Indian Navy has not been able to renew its inventory of submarines but the acquisition of the P-8I (I stands for India) has given it a very strong offensive capability to detect and hunt hostile submarines.

In fact, in terms of contemporary weapon technologies, the P-8I, often referred to as the "submarine killer", is perhaps the most advanced system that any of the three Indian services have acquired in recent years. The aircraft was deployed in 2013 by the Indian Navy around the same time the US Navy did.

The Defence Ministry has officially stated that the P-8I is "capable of thrusting a punitive response and maintaining a watch over India's immediate and extended areas of interest".

Asked about the growing number of hostile submarines in the Indian Ocean, nearer home in fact, Admiral Lanba said: "As a professional military force, we constantly evaluate the maritime security environment in our areas of interest. We lay a lot of stress on Maritime Domain Awareness (MDA). Accordingly, we are fully seized of the presence and likely intentions of all extra-regional forces operating in the Indian Ocean. Our Navy is fully capable and ever ready to meet any challenges that may arise in the maritime domain."

Significantly, the agreement for the P-8Is was signed on January 1, 2009, within a couple of months of the 26/11 Mumbai terror attacks which exposed the vulnerability of the country's maritime defences. The attack, in fact, triggered the government to clear quite a few proposals for the armed forces as well as to review what should be done to ensure security of Indian waters, particularly the coastal belts on the country's eastern and western seaboards.

The Navy is now the nodal agency for coordinating surveillance through satellites and aircraft and a network of police and small boats has also been integrated into the system.

The Navy and the Indian Coast Guard (ICG) also operate a number of HAL-made Dornier 228 aircraft, while some proposals for more LRMR and Medium-Range Maritime Reconnaissance (MRMR) have been on the table for the last few years.

Observed Admiral Lanba: "Every endeavour is being made to collectively ensure that our maritime security, of which coastal security is an important subset, is adequately strengthened."

"A number of measures have been taken since 26/11 to strengthen maritime, coastal and offshore security by the concerned agencies in the country. These measures broadly include increasing capacity and capabilities of maritime security forces, enhanced surveillance and domain awareness of the maritime zones, increased regulation of maritime activities, streamlining intelligence-sharing between different agencies and strengthening overall maritime governance. There have been significant improvements in the operational response to developing situations at and from the seas," he added.

At the national level, coordination of coastal security-related activities is being carried out by the National Committee for Strengthening Coastal and Maritime Security (NCSCMS).

The Navy had ordered eight P-8I aircraft in 2009 for $2.1 billion along with a training package. Weapons and torpedoes were extra as needed, and then, under the Options Clause, four more aircraft were ordered in August 2016.

The standard delivery schedule begins within three years of signing a contract and making the first payment. Boeing has said that it delivered the first lot of eight aircraft "on time, on cost" and helped set up their base at the INS Rajali Naval Air Station at Arakkonam in Tamil Nadu.

Boeing had been awarded a three-year contract in June last year for engineering and logistics support for the P-8I fleet. In January 2018, the Navy has been given approximately Rs 2,000 crore (almost $315 million) for a Training Solution along with a 10-year package for comprehensive maintenance service.

The training facility at INS Rajali will be the third of its kind after those in the US and Australia, and will train pilots, observers and ordnance and technical personnel. Spread over 60,000 sq ft, the facility would be completed by 2021.

A Training Simulator to be set up at the Naval Institute of Aeronautical Technology (NIAT), Kochi, for ab-initio training of the technical personnel is part of the package.

Pratyush Kumar, Boeing's India President and Vice President International, had observed after signing the three-year contract last year: "Our team remains focused on executing our commitments to customers on schedule and cost. With this contract, the Indian Navy can be assured of achieving exceptional operational capability and readiness of the P-8I fleet."

Boeing's earlier contract was due to expire in October 2017.

The Indian variant has certain Indian components, including communication software and IFF (Identify Friend or Foe), to align with Indian naval and Air Force aircraft and net-centric systems.

It has 360-degree radar view, thanks to Raytheon's AN/APY-40 forward looking radar's 240-degree coverage and the rest from Telefonics aft-looking radar.

Built on the Boeing 737 frame, the P8-I is capable of detecting and destroying hostile submarines deep under the water. It has 11 hard points for carrying Harpoon anti-shipping missiles and depth charges, and five stations in the weapons bay for Raytheon-supplied Mk-54 torpedoes. Two hard points upfront are for Search and Rescue equipment.

There are five operator stations, and windows for outside views. All the systems are integrated with the onboard Mission Computer and Display System for control and data distribution in high speeds with ultra-high resolution. The APY 10 radar is developed keeping in mind not just the land but waters of the vast oceans as well, be it day or night. It is capable of tracking even small vessels in littoral and high seas environments.

The Indian variant also has the Magnetic Anomaly Detector (MAD) which measures minute variations and disturbances in the earth's magnetic field caused by the underwater movement of steel-encased submarines.

India has already acquired a number of Harpoon Block II missiles for use both by the Navy and IAF, which also conducts maritime patrols.


@binayak95 @Adioz
 

nongaddarliberal

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Indian Navy looking at more P-8I 'submarine killers': Admiral Lanba
Sunday, January 28, 2018
By: ET

Source Link: CLICK HERE



The Indian Navy is considering the acquisition of more Boeing P-8I aircraft for surveillance and Anti-Submarine Warfare (ASW), according to Navy chief Admiral Sunil Lanba.

In an interview to the magazine 'India Strategic', Admiral Lanba said that air surveillance capability is an important subset of naval operations and that while the proposal was on the table, he could not disclose the required numbers.

His predecessors have spoken of a requirement of 30 Long-Range Maritime Reconnaissance (LRMR) aircraft, under which the navy has already inducted eight aircraft and placed an order for four more.

Because of the overall tardy process of routine modernisation of the armed forces over the last 30 years, the Indian Navy has not been able to renew its inventory of submarines but the acquisition of the P-8I (I stands for India) has given it a very strong offensive capability to detect and hunt hostile submarines.

In fact, in terms of contemporary weapon technologies, the P-8I, often referred to as the "submarine killer", is perhaps the most advanced system that any of the three Indian services have acquired in recent years. The aircraft was deployed in 2013 by the Indian Navy around the same time the US Navy did.

The Defence Ministry has officially stated that the P-8I is "capable of thrusting a punitive response and maintaining a watch over India's immediate and extended areas of interest".

Asked about the growing number of hostile submarines in the Indian Ocean, nearer home in fact, Admiral Lanba said: "As a professional military force, we constantly evaluate the maritime security environment in our areas of interest. We lay a lot of stress on Maritime Domain Awareness (MDA). Accordingly, we are fully seized of the presence and likely intentions of all extra-regional forces operating in the Indian Ocean. Our Navy is fully capable and ever ready to meet any challenges that may arise in the maritime domain."

Significantly, the agreement for the P-8Is was signed on January 1, 2009, within a couple of months of the 26/11 Mumbai terror attacks which exposed the vulnerability of the country's maritime defences. The attack, in fact, triggered the government to clear quite a few proposals for the armed forces as well as to review what should be done to ensure security of Indian waters, particularly the coastal belts on the country's eastern and western seaboards.

The Navy is now the nodal agency for coordinating surveillance through satellites and aircraft and a network of police and small boats has also been integrated into the system.

The Navy and the Indian Coast Guard (ICG) also operate a number of HAL-made Dornier 228 aircraft, while some proposals for more LRMR and Medium-Range Maritime Reconnaissance (MRMR) have been on the table for the last few years.

Observed Admiral Lanba: "Every endeavour is being made to collectively ensure that our maritime security, of which coastal security is an important subset, is adequately strengthened."

"A number of measures have been taken since 26/11 to strengthen maritime, coastal and offshore security by the concerned agencies in the country. These measures broadly include increasing capacity and capabilities of maritime security forces, enhanced surveillance and domain awareness of the maritime zones, increased regulation of maritime activities, streamlining intelligence-sharing between different agencies and strengthening overall maritime governance. There have been significant improvements in the operational response to developing situations at and from the seas," he added.

At the national level, coordination of coastal security-related activities is being carried out by the National Committee for Strengthening Coastal and Maritime Security (NCSCMS).

The Navy had ordered eight P-8I aircraft in 2009 for $2.1 billion along with a training package. Weapons and torpedoes were extra as needed, and then, under the Options Clause, four more aircraft were ordered in August 2016.

The standard delivery schedule begins within three years of signing a contract and making the first payment. Boeing has said that it delivered the first lot of eight aircraft "on time, on cost" and helped set up their base at the INS Rajali Naval Air Station at Arakkonam in Tamil Nadu.

Boeing had been awarded a three-year contract in June last year for engineering and logistics support for the P-8I fleet. In January 2018, the Navy has been given approximately Rs 2,000 crore (almost $315 million) for a Training Solution along with a 10-year package for comprehensive maintenance service.

The training facility at INS Rajali will be the third of its kind after those in the US and Australia, and will train pilots, observers and ordnance and technical personnel. Spread over 60,000 sq ft, the facility would be completed by 2021.

A Training Simulator to be set up at the Naval Institute of Aeronautical Technology (NIAT), Kochi, for ab-initio training of the technical personnel is part of the package.

Pratyush Kumar, Boeing's India President and Vice President International, had observed after signing the three-year contract last year: "Our team remains focused on executing our commitments to customers on schedule and cost. With this contract, the Indian Navy can be assured of achieving exceptional operational capability and readiness of the P-8I fleet."

Boeing's earlier contract was due to expire in October 2017.

The Indian variant has certain Indian components, including communication software and IFF (Identify Friend or Foe), to align with Indian naval and Air Force aircraft and net-centric systems.

It has 360-degree radar view, thanks to Raytheon's AN/APY-40 forward looking radar's 240-degree coverage and the rest from Telefonics aft-looking radar.

Built on the Boeing 737 frame, the P8-I is capable of detecting and destroying hostile submarines deep under the water. It has 11 hard points for carrying Harpoon anti-shipping missiles and depth charges, and five stations in the weapons bay for Raytheon-supplied Mk-54 torpedoes. Two hard points upfront are for Search and Rescue equipment.

There are five operator stations, and windows for outside views. All the systems are integrated with the onboard Mission Computer and Display System for control and data distribution in high speeds with ultra-high resolution. The APY 10 radar is developed keeping in mind not just the land but waters of the vast oceans as well, be it day or night. It is capable of tracking even small vessels in littoral and high seas environments.

The Indian variant also has the Magnetic Anomaly Detector (MAD) which measures minute variations and disturbances in the earth's magnetic field caused by the underwater movement of steel-encased submarines.

India has already acquired a number of Harpoon Block II missiles for use both by the Navy and IAF, which also conducts maritime patrols.


@binayak95 @Adioz
LOL I guess the author got a little too excited and posted the same pic 4 times.
 

Shashwat

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^^ I think it'll be done or atleast kicked into with Macron visit in February/March along with more rafale initial discussion.
 

Hindustani78

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Ministry of Defence
02-February, 2018 17:13 IST
Rear Admiral SJ Singh, NM appointed as the Flag officer Sea Training (Fost)


Rear Admiral Sanjay Jasjit Singh, NM has been appointed as the Flag Officer Sea Training, at Kochi. He was commissioned in 1986, in the Executive Branch of the Indian Navy. A graduate of the National Defence Academy, Pune, where he was adjudged the Best Naval Cadet, he was also awarded the Binoculars for Best Sea Cadet and Sword of Honour for the Best Midshipman during subsequent naval training. He specialised in Navigation and Direction, in 1992, where he stood first in the course. He attended the Advanced Command and Staff Course at UK, in 2000, where he was adjudged the Best Overseas Student amongst 90 participating Armed Forces from 50 countries. He has undergone the Naval Higher Command Course at Naval War College, Mumbai, in 2009, and the National Security Strategy Course at the National Defence College, Delhi, in 2012.

He has held a range of command, training and staff appointments, and has served on most classes of ships of the Indian Navy, over the past 30 years. His sea command appointments include command of the ASW and UAV-control Frigate INS Taragiri, where he was awarded the Nao Sena Medal, and the multi-role Frigate INS Trishul. His training appointments include Officer-in-Charge of the Warship Work Up Team at Mumbai, and the Navigation Direction School at Kochi. His staff appointments include Indian Naval Attaché at Iran, and the Joint Director of Personnel, Principal Director of Naval Operations, Principal Director Strategy, Concepts and Transformation, and the Assistant Chief of Naval Staff (Communications, Space and Network Centric Operations) at Naval Headquarters.

He was the lead drafter for the Indian Navy’s Maritime Doctrine, 2009; Strategic Guidance to Transformation, 2015, and the Indian Maritime Security Strategy, 2015. A keen student of military affairs, he has completed several post-graduate study programmes, including MSc and MPhil in Defence and Strategic Studies from Madras University; MA in Defence Studies from Kings College, London; MA (History), MPhil (Pol) and PhD (Arts) from Mumbai University.

****
 

Prashant12

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Garden Reach Shipbuilders & Engineers Limited (GRSE), Kolkata will soon receive orders for building 8 shallow water anti-submarine warfare (ASW) craft. The total build plan is for 16 units, split between Cochin Shipyard Limited, which was the lowest bidder and GRSE which was L-2.

 

Hindustani78

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Ministry of Defence
05-February, 2018 15:24 IST


Rear Admiral Atul Anand, VSM takes Over as the Assistant Chief of Naval Staff – Foreign Cooperation and Intelligence {ACNS (FCI)}


Rear Admiral Atul Anand, VSM has been appointed as the Assistant Chief of Naval Staff – Foreign Cooperation and Intelligence {ACNS (FCI)} at IHQ MoD (Navy), New Delhi. He was commissioned in 1988, in the Executive Branch of the Indian Navy.

An alumnus of the National Defence Academy, Khadakvasla, the Defence Services Command and Staff College, Mirpur, Bangladesh and the National Defence College, New Delhi, the Admiral is a specialist in Navigation and Direction. He has also attended the prestigious Advance Security Cooperation Course at the Asia Pacific Centre for Security Studies, Hawaii, USA.

A recipient of the Vishisht Seva Medal, the Admiral has held several key command appointments in his naval career including the command of Torpedo Recovery Vessel IN TRV A72, Missile Boat INS Chatak, Corvette INS Khukri and the Destroyer INS Mumbai. He has also served as the Navigating Officer of IN Ships Sharda, Ranvijay and Jyoti. In addition, he was the Direction Officer of the Sea Harrier Squadron INAS 300 and Executive Officer of the destroyer INS Delhi.

His important Staff appointments include Joint Director Staff Requirements, Directing Staff at the Defence Services Staff College, Wellington, Director Naval Operations, Director Naval Intelligence (Ops), Principal Director Naval Operations and the Principal Director Strategy, Concepts and Transformation.

He is also the Honorary Secretary General of the Yachting Association of India (YAI).

****

Ministry of Defence
05-February, 2018 12:15 IST
Navika Sagar Parikrama - Tarini departs Port Stanley, Falklands

Indian Naval Sailing Vessel (INSV) Tarini left Port Stanley on 04 Feb 18 for its onwards journey to Cape Town (South Africa). INSV Tarini had arrived at Port Stanley on 21 January 2018 after completion of third leg of it’s maiden voyage to circumnavigate the globe. This historic circumnavigation attempt by an all-women crew is being led by Lieutenant Commander Vartika Joshi, and the crew comprises Lieutenant Commanders Pratibha Jamwal, P Swathi, and Lieutenants S Vijaya Devi, B Aishwarya and Payal Gupta.



Mr Nigel Philips, CBE, Governor of the Falkland Islands and her Majesty’s Commissioner of South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands welcomed Tarini into Port Stanley on 21 January 2018.



As part of their stay in harbour, Team Tarini interacted with students from Falkland Islands Community School for Secondary Education, Brownies and Girl Guides, Beavers and Boy Scouts and young adults from the Hockey Club. The crew also visited sites related with the 1982 conflict and paid respects at the 2 Para memorial. They also visited the Argentine Military Cemetery at Darwin.



The Governor Mr Nigel Philips, CBE and Mrs Emma Philips visited INSV Tarini. The Falkland Islands Hockey Team and local populace also visited the vessel while she was open for onboard visits. Team Tarini visited Infant, Junior and Mount Pleasant Schools and interacted with the children and also with Falkland Women’s Association and the Women’s Network. The Skipper Lieutenant Commander Vartika Joshi along with Lieutenant Commander Pratibha Jamwal gave a talk and presentation at the Falkland Islands Museum. The crew also visited various military facilities including HMS Protector and interacted with British Forces in South Atlantic Islands.



The crew also experienced the vast ecological and biological diversity of the Islands which is particularly rich in wildlife. This is in consonance with the theme to promote awareness about marine pollution and contribute to their efforts towards environmental Consciousness.



The visit of INSV Tarini to Port Stanley was covered widely in the International social media and the Falklands print and electronic media. The next port halt is scheduled at Cape Town, South Africa on 08 Mar 18.




 

Hindustani78

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Ministry of Defence
06-February, 2018 17:13 IST

Rear Admiral Sanjay Vatsayan, NM takes over as Assistant chief of Naval Staff (Policy & Planning)

RAdm Sanjay Vatsayan, NM has taken over as the Assistant Chief of Naval Staff (Policy & Plans) at Integrated Headquarters Ministry of Defence (Navy) at New Delhi. He is a graduate of the National Defence Academy, Pune, India (1986), Defence Services Staff College, Wellington, India (2003), Naval War College, Mumbai, India (2010) and National Defence College, New Delhi (2014).

He was commissioned into the Indian Navy on 01 Jan 1988 and specialised in Gunnery and missile systems in 1994. He has done his specialist tenures on frontline ships of the Indian Navy, including as the commissioning crew, INS Mysore and Coast Guard OPV CGS Sangram. He has also served as the Executive Officer of INS Mysore. His Command assignments include a Coast Guard IPV, Missile vessels INS Vibhuti and INS Nashak, missile corvette INS Kuthar and Guided Missile Frigate INS Sahyadri (commissioning crew).

His staff assignments include Joint Director of Personnel, Director of Personnel (Policy), Director Naval Plans (Perspective Planning) and Principal Director Naval Plans.

*************

Ministry of Defence
06-February, 2018 17:11 IST
Rear Admiral Rajaram Swaminathan, NM assumes charge as Assistant chief of Materiel (Mordernisation)


RAdm R Swaminathan, NM has taken over duties of Assistant Chief of Materiel (Mordernisation). Commissioned in 1987, the Admiral is a post graduate from IIT Kharagpur. In a career spanning more than 30 years, he has worked on board the Aircraft Carrier, INS Viraat, for more than 9 years in various capacities. He was also involved in the acquisition of Aircraft Carrier Vikramaditya, as Warship Production Superintendent in Russia and as Principal Director Aircraft Carrier Projects in Delhi. RAdm R Swaminathan, has held many important assignments including Fleet Engineer Officer (Western Fleet), Director of Personnel and General Manager (Refit) Naval Dockyard, Mumbai. He is an alumnus of Defence Services Staff College and the National Defence College. The officer was Principal Director Ship Production before assuming the appointment of ACOM (Modernisation) on promotion to Flag Rank.
 

Tanmay

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Shallow water Anti submarine ship pics/graphics anyone ? Since the project has already been awarded to two contenders.
And what's the status of towed array sonar ? Is variable depth sonar the same
 

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