HAL Light Utility Helicopter (LUH) and Light Observation Helicopter (LOH)

Sridhar_TN

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The LCH is protected via an extensive electronic warfare suite which is provided by the South African division of Saab Group; this suite comprises various defensive elements to guard against several different threats, these include a radar warning receiver (RWR), laser warning receiver (LWR) and a missile approach warning (MAW) system.[5]

And it also has infrared suppressor just like Apache.

It's a very advanced helicopter. Only other iaf birds with laser warning are rafale and maybe Apache . Lol.
I believe the apaches are fitted with DIRCM modules that are very effective against MANPADS.
That would be an awesome addition to the LCH. I believe ELBIT also offers DIRCM systems. Not an expert in effectiveness of the DIRCM’s. But even if we just have 2 ATGM’s along with 2 rocket pods per chopper, the presence of a strong counter measure system for MANPADSis more of a bargain than additional weapons systems.
 

Bleh

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There should be no need to add a bigger/heavier gun on the LCH than the one currently fitted on it.
Focus should be on carrying effective ATGM’s and guided rockets if possible. In addition, countermeasures to MANPAD systems. MANPADS are the main threats that platforms like this will face and can be deadly when engaging China or pak.
Adding 30mm isn’t going to make the Helicopter that Heavy of Platform.
You know, if you give it some thought he is actually right though. The LCH may operate with 30mm cannon but it does not need to.
Such cannon is primarily meant to engage hard target like armoured vehicles, or concrete structures, which will have heavy gun (.50cal or higher). No chance in a conventional war with a proper army (not even by Mi-35 or Apache)!.. LCH is meant to utilise the terrain topography & curvature of Earth as cover to fire 20km ranged SANT-missile from well outside enemy range & duck/drop lower. Instead of a larger gun (& heavier ammo) it could carry 2 more standoff ATGMs.

Only the small fry will be engaged at direct line-of-sight, like infantry or softskinned vehicles with 7.62x51 LMGs max firepower... 20mm is good enough for that.


LCH is to have a DIRCM by the way. Rudra don't.
HAL LCH sports an Electronic Warfare Suite and a state-of-the-art sensor suite which includes electronic warfare suite with a radar warning receiver, laser warning receiver and missile approach warning system. The LCH’s four-axis auto-hover and digital automatic flight control system have been developed in-house, while the DRDO’s Bangalore-based Defence Avionics Research Establishment (DARE) is developing the defensive aids suite, which includes a combined radar/laser warning system (this being SaabTech’s MILDS AR-60V2) and Bharat Dynamics Ltd-developed countermeasures dispensers.
DARE has also developed in-house the digital mission computer and pylon interface boxes. The flight control actuator system has been co-developed by HAL and the UK-based APPH. The SAGEM subsidiary of France’s SAFRAN Group, which has had a presence in India since the 1960s, has supplied the piloting inertial reference system (APIRS), more than 100 of which are already on board the Dhruv ALH. The APIRS uses new-generation inertial technologies like fibre-optic gyroscope (FOG) and silicon accelerometer. Other SAGEM-supplied items on board are the digital autopilot (which is also on the ‘Dhruv’), and the Sigma-95L RLG-INS. It will also feature a 25kg C-Music directional infra-red countermeasures (DIRCM) suite.
HAL LCH also sports a Elbit Compact Multi Purpose Advance Stabilisation System (CoMPASS) electro-optic/infrared turret that is integrated into the nose . The CoMPASS is a day-and-night surveillance system that includes a colour TV daylight camera, third generation 3-5 µm forward-looking infrared (FLIR) sensor; laser target designator and rangefinder; and automatic tracking capabilities. It is being license built in India by Bharat Electronics Limited.
 
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IndianHawk

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No chance in a conventional war with a proper army (not even by Mi-35 or Apache)!.. LCH is meant to utilise the terrain topography & curvature of
Lch has better armour than mi35 in some respect!
Even ajai Shukla admits it.

Defence Materials Research Laboratory (DMRL), Hyderabad has developed the armour for the LCH from ceramic plates. The pilots’ area was designed to withstand a direct hit at 90 degrees from a 12.7 mm armour-piercing round. To put that in perspective (Perspex-tive… Ha! Ha!) some of the IAF Mi-35s, which were deployed in Congo, took hits from 12.7 mm AP rounds. They penetrated right through the armoured glass of the Mi-35. And that’s a much heavier machine.
 

Sridhar_TN

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Lch has better armour than mi35 in some respect!
Even ajai Shukla admits it.

Defence Materials Research Laboratory (DMRL), Hyderabad has developed the armour for the LCH from ceramic plates. The pilots’ area was designed to withstand a direct hit at 90 degrees from a 12.7 mm armour-piercing round. To put that in perspective (Perspex-tive… Ha! Ha!) some of the IAF Mi-35s, which were deployed in Congo, took hits from 12.7 mm AP rounds. They penetrated right through the armoured glass of the Mi-35. And that’s a much heavier machine.
They should just push into production already for the lch. How much longer does everyone have to wait?
 

MIDKNIGHT FENERIR-00

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There should be no need to add a bigger/heavier gun on the LCH than the one currently fitted on it.
Focus should be on carrying effective ATGM’s and guided rockets if possible. In addition, countermeasures to MANPAD systems. MANPADS are the main threats that platforms like this will face and can be deadly when engaging China or pak.
Ok I can see your point. I guess the Apache already covers the Ground Attacking Role with its 30mm Cannon. Yes more focus should be put on the hard hitting Rockets, ATGMs and countermeasures on LCH.
 

WolfPack86

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Indo-Russian Light Copter ‘Overdue’, India’s Own Speeds Up

This August, a pair of HAL Light Utility Helicopter (LUH) prototypes will head to the Siachen glacier for a final capability demonstration to the Indian Army. The two prototypes will provide finishing touches to what has been a highly successful proving exercise to the Army, which plans to induct at least 126 LUH to replace its Cheetah and Chetak helicopters.


The Indian Air Force, which plans to induct at least 60 LUH, is already convinced — certification with the IAF was completed recently. With the final high altitude trials in August with the Army, the LUH will be ready in all respects for operational service, a process that will kick off next year.


The final stretch is good news in ways not immediately visible. These may be simple helicopters, but they’re more urgently needed than any other type at this time. The helicopters that the LUH will replace — the Cheetahs and Chetaks — form the core of aerial logistics to India’s forward areas at forbidding high altitudes. Both of those types, of French vintage and license produced for decades by HAL, have been up for replacement for years. The LUH itself was borne from repeated past attempts at procuring replacements for the in-service helicopters.


The new LUH update broke in an exclusive Livefist interview with HAL’s chairman. You can watch that full video at Livefist’s YouTube channel, here.


The August trials at the super-high altitude terrain in the Himalayas will be the second such test of the LUH. In September last year, an LUH went through trials at Ladakh’s Daulat Beg Oldie, the world’s highest landing ground.

The LUH achieved initial operational clearance (IOC) in February, with FOC planned for next year, by which time paperwork on inductions will have begun. Both the IAF and Army have expressed confidence in starting procurement procedures, a sign that the LUH has established early maturity. Most work towards FOC will focus on systems and automatic flight control system (AFCS) work until the services issue their requests for quotation (RFQ) with firm requirements.


With a high rate of production planned, LUHs will be churned out from HAL’s Bengaluru rotorcraft facility to replace in-service Chetak and Cheetah helicopters that form a crucial logistical element in India’s high altitude deployments.


Meanwhile, a splendid set of photographs (by HAL rotorwing designer Gagan Deep Singh) of the 3 LUH prototypes flying in formation on June 13 in Bengaluru has underscored the high energy coursing through this crucial program as it enters the final stretch. The formation was a farewell gift to the LUH program’s chief designer M.A. Quraishi who retires at the end of this month. (Text continues after the photographs)


While the LUH speeds towards final capability, the program it shares space with has ground to a halt, with no forward movement for three years now. The HAL-Russian Helicopters joint venture to manufacture the Kamov Ka-226T light helicopter in Tumakuru near Bengaluru is ‘overdue’, HAL’s chairman R. Madhavan tells Livefist, with negotiations stuck on the level of indigenous content in the helicopters. HAL has insisted on a minimum of 70% indigenous content.


It is with the MoD to take a final decision. Everything as far as the technical evaluation is complete. There are a couple of things regarding indigenous content. It will move forward. After that there will be price bid opening, and we are all prepared for that. It will be through a joint venture company. We have been waiting, it’s actually overdue,” HAL chairman R. Madhavan told Livefist.

Given the urgency of the requirement for these helicopters, it is with a sense of alarm that the armed forces are regarding the stalled program. It was nearly five years ago, in December 2015, that HAL and Russia had tied up and decided to manufacture the Ka-226T. Even accounting for procedure, the fact that not a piece of metal has been cut towards a Ka-226T airframe is telling.


The Ka-226T and HAL’s LUH will each supply approximately half of the a total requirement of 384 helicopters for the Indian Army and IAF.
 

Pulkit

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update about LUH.
Few questions which pop up in my mind... might sound stupid but still:
1) Why wait till August?
2) I believe IAF has already given the nod, why different nod from Army?
3) Is there any difference in IAF and IA version?
4) With around 180+ to be placed on order, how soon will they(HAL) be able to replace the entire fleet of aging Chetak and Cheetah.
 

Chinmoy

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Few questions which pop up in my mind... might sound stupid but still:
1) Why wait till August?
2) I believe IAF has already given the nod, why different nod from Army?
3) Is there any difference in IAF and IA version?
4) With around 180+ to be placed on order, how soon will they(HAL) be able to replace the entire fleet of aging Chetak and Cheetah.
1) Because you don't want to undertake a test in Summer season in Leh and Ladakh. The time available for test in summer is too small during this time.
2) Because pilots from AAW would have to undertake the tests before certification.
3) Very little or negligible in this case.
4) Even god would hesitate to answer this.
 

patriots

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1) Because you don't want to undertake a test in Summer season in Leh and Ladakh. The time available for test in summer is too small during this time.
2) Because pilots from AAW would have to undertake the tests before certification.
3) Very little or negligible in this case.
4) Even god would hesitate to answer this.
Hals helicopter production is good
They delivered helicopters before the delivery date....
Hope hal will do the same with luh....
But I believe still ia and iaf will depend on cheetah in Siachen for some days...till they get confidence
 

WolfPack86

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India’s Light Utility Helicopter In Ladakh For FINAL Trials
It’s the final stretch before an indigenous light helicopter will be ready to replace hundreds of Cheetah and Chetak helicopters in military service.


Two HAL Light Utility Helicopter (LUH) prototypes landed in Ladakh on August 19 for what is playing out as a final capability demonstration for the Indian Army before orders are placed. The helicopters, in their final stretch of flight test to meet an Indian armed forces requirement of nearly 200 of these, have been flying sorties between Leh, forward airfields like Daulat Beg Oldie and even super-high altitude helipads at the Siachen glacier. The demonstration, requested by the Army, comes amidst a continuing military standoff in eastern Ladakh between the Indian and Chinese armies. You can read all about the LUH’s final stretch in our June report here.


The LUHs are back in Ladakh for the second time in less than a year. In September last year, an LUH prototype operated from the world’s highest airfield at Daulat Beg Oldie. You can read about those trial flights in our September 2019 report here. The current deployment comes at a dramatically different time from last year. Over the last week, the LUH prototypes have been flying with Indian Army pilots close to areas not far from the military standoff zones. Daulat Beg Oldie, where the LUH has operated from both last year and this week, is also the site of a major mobilisation on both sides of the Line of Actual Control.

The deployment is a crucial one for Hindustan Aeronautics Ltd (HAL), which was recently invited by the Indian Air Force to send a pair of Light Combat Helicopters (LCH) to Ladakh on an unprecedented force projection deployment in an operational setting. Livefist had detailed that deployment here with first videos breaking cover on our YouTube channel.


As we noted earlier this year, the LUH achieved initial operational clearance (IOC) in February, with FOC planned for next year, by which time paperwork on inductions will have begun. Both the IAF and Army have expressed confidence in starting procurement procedures, a sign that the LUH has established early maturity. Most work towards FOC will focus on systems and automatic flight control system (AFCS) work until the services issue their requests for quotation (RFQ) with firm requirements.


The LUH will replace legacy Cheetah and Chetak utility helicopters in the Indian Army and Indian Air Force. The latter type made a prominent popular culture blip this month with a biopic on IAF pilot Gunjan Saxena hitting screens. Saxena had flown Chetak sorties during the 1999 Kargil conflict.

Meanwhile, the government has decided to offload 15% stake in Hindustan Aeronautics Ltd (HAL) to raise funds amidst the current pandemic. At present the government holds a 90% stake in the company following an initial public offering (IPO) in 2018.
 

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