China says South China Sea land reclamation 'justified'

tramp

Senior Member
Joined
Oct 17, 2009
Messages
1,464
Likes
580
And the similarity between Sinhalese script and some ancient scripts from Buddhist period in India are very striking.
Check the resemblance between Oriya , Bengali and Sinhalese and find it out yourself.
 
Last edited:

Ray

The Chairman
Professional
Joined
Apr 17, 2009
Messages
43,133
Likes
23,788


An Alu polymorphism analysis of Sinhalese from Colombo by Dr Sarabjit Mastanain in 2007 using Tamil, Bengali, Gujarati (Patel), and Punjabi as parental populations found different proportions of genetic contribution.

A genetic distance analysis by Dr Robet Kirk also concluded that the modern Sinhalese are most closely related to the Bengalis.

This is further substantiated by a VNTR study, which found 82% of Sinhalese genes to originate from Bengali admixture.

Genetic studies on Sinhalese - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
 

amoy

Senior Member
Joined
Jan 17, 2010
Messages
5,982
Likes
1,845
@mods suggest to rename this thread " Diego Garcia of Pacific in the Offing" :thumb:


China building airstrip-capable island on Fiery Cross Reef - IHS Jane's 360


Airbus Defence and Space imagery dated 14 November 2014 shows Chinese land reclamation operations under way at Fiery Cross Reef in the South China Sea. Multiple operating dredgers provide the ability to generate terrain rapidly. Operating from a harbour area, dredgers deliver sediment via a network of piping. (© CNES 2014, Distribution Airbus DS / Spot Image / IHS)

Key Points
China is reclaiming land at Fiery Cross Reef in the Spratly Islands, according to satellite imagery
The reclamation, which started in August, is creating a land mass large enough for a 3,000 m-long airstrip
China is building an island at least 3,000 m long on Fiery Cross Reef that could be the site for its first airstrip in the Spratly Islands in the South China Sea.

Satellite imagery of the island taken on 8 August and 14 November shows that in the past three months Chinese dredgers have created a land mass that is almost the entire length of the reef.

Fiery Cross Reef lies to the west of the main Spratly island archipelago and was previously under water; the only habitable area was a concrete platform built and maintained by China's People's Liberation Army Navy (PLAN).

The new island is more than 3,000 m long and between 200 and 300 m wide: large enough to construct a runway and apron. The dredgers are also creating a harbour to the east of the reef that would appear to be large enough to receive tankers and major surface combatants.

The existing structure on the reef's southwestern edge was home to a PLAN garrison and had a pier, air-defence guns, anti-frogmen defences, communications equipment, and a greenhouse. The concrete structure is currently not attached to the new island, but if previous Chinese land reclamation projects in the Spratlys are any guide, it is only a matter of time before it is joined up.

The Spratly Islands are claimed by Brunei, China, Malaysia, the Philippines, Taiwan, and Vietnam. All but Brunei occupy islands or have built structures on reefs and shoals to assert their claims.

The land reclamation at Fiery Cross is the fourth such project undertaken by China in the Spratly Islands in the last 12-18 months and by far the largest in scope. China has built new islands at Johnson South Reef, Cuateron Reef, and Gaven Reefs, but none are large enough to house an airstrip in their current form.

Ship tracking data from IHS Maritime shows substantial activity at the reef since May 2014. Analysts drew attention to two ships in particular: Jin Hang Jun 406 , a grab dredger that is fixed on a pontoon, and 3,086-tonne cutter suction dredger Xin Hai Tun . Both have been instrumental in dredging and cutting channels into the new harbour basin.

ANALYSIS
IHS Jane's previously reported on China's reclamation project in the Spratlys and noted that until recently Fiery Cross appeared to be acting as a staging post for other island building projects. Given its status as the largest PLAN facility in the Spratlys, this seemed to be an anomaly, something that the 14 November imagery has now corrected.

China has been at a distinct disadvantage compared with other claimants in the Spratly Islands as it is the only claimant not to occupy an island with an airfield. Taiwan has Itu Aba (Taiping) island, the Philippines has Pagasa island, Malaysia has Swallow Reef (a reef on which it reclaimed land and built an airstrip), and Vietnam has Southwest Cay.

The work at Fiery Cross thus brings parity but is likely to cause alarm among the other claimants. China has previously shown it is willing to spend blood and treasure to assert its territorial claims in this region. Given its massive military advantage over the other claimants in terms of quantity and quality of materiel, this facility appears purpose-built to coerce other claimants into relinquishing their claims and possessions, or at least provide China with a much stronger negotiating position if talks over the dispute were ever held.

Shiptec China 2014: CSSRC showcases plans to build floating docks for Spratly Islands - IHS Jane's 360
China builds another island in South China Sea - IHS Jane's 360



A second platform variant is based on a semisubmersible vessel that can be used for light construction and maintenance of the island. Source: Cornelius Weening
 

amoy

Senior Member
Joined
Jan 17, 2010
Messages
5,982
Likes
1,845
China building coastguard ship based on Type 056 corvette hull - IHS Jane's 360


Images have appeared online showing a CCG ship that is based on the Type 056 corvette in PLAN service
Although the CCG operates a number of decommissioned PLAN ships, the choice of a warship hull for a newbuild coastguard vessel is slightly surprising as naval construction usually increases the cost due to the extensive compartmentalisation of the ship required to enhance its watertight integrity.

However, the number and rate of build of the Type 056 corvettes indicates the PLAN is satisfied with the performance and capabilities of these ships. It is not known how many vessels of this type are required by the CCG but if it is only a small number, it may be more cost-effective to draw on a proven hull design than start from scratch. Another benefit the CCG may be seeking in adopting the Type 056 hull is to improve logistics support and reduce maintenance costs by increasing commonality with systems used by the PLAN.

Images have appeared online showing a CCG ship that is based on the Type 056 corvette in PLAN service.
 

Ray

The Chairman
Professional
Joined
Apr 17, 2009
Messages
43,133
Likes
23,788
US Navy: Beijing creating a 'great wall of sand' in South China Sea

Commander of US Pacific fleet says China is building artificial land in disputed waters by pumping sand on to live coral reefs and paving them with concrete



A Chinese flag flies from a structure on the Mischief Reef off the disputed Spratlys archipelago in the South China Sea in 1999. Chinese land reclamation in the area has increased considerably.

China is "creating a great wall of sand" through land reclamation in the South China Sea, causing serious concerns about its territorial intentions, the commander of the US Pacific fleet said on Tuesday.

Admiral Harry Harris Jr told a naval conference in Australia that competing territorial claims by several nations in the South China Sea are "increasing regional tensions and the potential for miscalculation".

"But what's really drawing a lot of concern in the here and now is the unprecedented land reclamation currently being conducted by China," he said.

"China is building artificial land by pumping sand on to live coral reefs – some of them submerged – and paving over them with concrete. China has now created over 4 square kilometers (1.5 square miles) of artificial landmass," he said.

Harris said the region is known for its beautiful natural islands, but "in sharp contrast, China is creating a great wall of sand with dredges and bulldozers over the course of months".

China claims virtually all of the South China Sea. The Philippines and other countries that have territorial disputes with China in the busy sea have been particularly concerned by the land reclamation projects, which have turned a number of previously submerged reefs in the Spratlys archipelago into artificial islands with buildings, runways and wharves. The islands could be used for military and other facilities to bolster China's territorial claims.

Harris said the pace of China's construction of artificial islands "raises serious questions about Chinese intentions".

He said the United States continues to urge all claimants to conform to the 2002 China-Asean Declaration of Conduct, in which the parties committed to "exercise self-restraint in the conduct of activities that would complicate or escalate disputes and affect peace and stability".

"How China proceeds will be a key indicator of whether the region is heading toward confrontation or cooperation," he said.

The US says it has a national interest in the peaceful resolution of the disputes in a region crucial for world trade. China says its territorial claims have a historical basis and objects to what it considers US meddling.

Harris said the United States is on track to reposition 60% of its navy to the Pacific fleet by 2020.

"By maintaining a capable and credible forward presence in the region, we're able to improve our ability to maintain stability and security," he said. "If any crisis does break out, we're better positioned to quickly respond."
US Navy: Beijing creating a 'great wall of sand' in South China Sea | World news | The Guardian
China 'aggressively' expanding into South China Sea says US
Director of National Intelligence James Clapper tells US senators there is a worrying trend of conflict between China's neighbours over expansion



A Chinese Coast Guard vessel passes near the Chinese oil rig, Haiyang Shi You 981 in the South China Sea, about 210 km (130 miles) from the coast of Vietnam. The US says it is concerned at China's aggressive exertion of sovereignty in the sea.

China is expanding its outposts in the South China Sea to include stationing for ships and potential airfields as part of its "aggressive" effort to exert sovereignty, the US intelligence chief said Thursday.

Director of National Intelligence James Clapper was speaking at a Senate Armed Services Committee hearing on worldwide threats. His comments underscore US concern over land reclamation activities that could fuel tensions between China and its neighbours over disputed islands and reefs.

"Although China is looking for stable ties with the United States it's more willing to accept bilateral and regional tensions in pursuit of its interests, particularly on maritime sovereignty issues," Clapper said.

He described China's claims traced by a so-called nine-dash line a rough boundary covering more than 80 percent of the South China Sea as "exorbitant."

The US is not a claimant of territory in the South China Sea but does claim a national interest in the peaceful resolution of the disputes in a region crucial for world trade.

China says its territorial claims have a historical basis and objects to what it consider US meddling.

Sen John McCain, the committee's Republican chairman, displayed commercial satellite imagery showing expansion of the Chinese-occupied Gaven Reef in the Spratly Islands in the past year.

He said China's expansion could allow it to employ weaponry, including anti-air and other capabilities.

Clapper said China was still in a construction phase so it was unclear what weaponry or forces it might deploy there.

Advertisement

He said such Chinese activities in the past year-and-a-half, combined with oil drilling near disputed islands that caused conflict with Vietnam, was a "worrying trend."

The Centre for Strategic and International Studies last week said Vietnam, Malaysia and Taiwan have over the years modified existing land masses in the South China Sea, and the Philippines is planning to upgrade an airport and pier on an island it occupies.

But among the claimants, China is unusual in how it has been "dramatically changing the size and structure of physical land features," the think tank said.

China has had a troop and supply garrison at Gaven Reef since 2003, but it began significant construction there last year, building a new artificial island, more than 18 acres in size. The main building on the new island appears to have an anti-aircraft tower, the center said.
China 'aggressively' expanding into South China Sea says US | World news | The Guardian
China is on its way to claim the world as their own.

But one should not be surprised at their pirate like way.

It is in their genes.

They had Ching Shih: pirate queen of the South China Sea.

Ching Shih (1775 - 1844) was a pirate who controlled a fleet of 1,800 ships. Not only did she plunder boats, she defeated the British, Chinese and Portuguese navies, before negotiating a long and wealthy retirement for herself.

For as long as cargo ships have sailed the seas, pirates have plundered and pillaged them. Most pirates have been wild and lawless men. And when arrested, their careers have ended with the loss of their fortune, their freedom, and their heads.

But in the early 19th century, a remarkable pirate ruled the South China Sea - and that pirate was a woman! She was not only immensely well-organised and fond of rules, but also ended her days with a title, a fortune, and the respect of the Qing establishment.

In 1809, the Chinese emperor sent an armada to attack Ching's fleet. Ching easily defeated him, capturing 63 ships and "persuading" most of the crew to join her. Despite enlisting the support of the British and Portuguese navies, as well as Dutch merchant ships, after two years the Emperor gave up.

She then set about unifying the fleet with a tough code of laws. Pirates under her command would be beheaded if they gave their own orders, or disobeyed hers, or stole from supply villages or from group funds. All booty had to be presented for inspection and registration, and then 80 per cent was put into the common fund. Deserters had their ears chopped off.

In particular, there were special rules for female captives. If the captive was ugly, she was immediately released. If she was pretty, a pirate could marry her, but then had to be a faithful husband or face beheading.

If men were captured, they could choose between joining the pirates, or having their feet nailed to the deck and being beaten to death.

Therefore, their Govt encourages and recognises piracy and thieving.
 
Last edited:

Ray

The Chairman
Professional
Joined
Apr 17, 2009
Messages
43,133
Likes
23,788
Obama: China 'using muscle' to dominate in South China Sea



The US is concerned China is using "sheer size and muscle" to strong-arm smaller nations in the row over the South China Sea, Barack Obama says.

The US president's comments came amid heightened focus on Beijing's construction of artificial islands in disputed areas of the sea.

On Thursday a US think tank released images showing land reclamation work on a reef claimed by the Philippines.

China says the work is needed to safeguard its sovereignty.

China claims almost the whole of the South China Sea, resulting in overlapping claims with several other Asian nations including Vietnam and the Philippines.

They say China is illegally reclaiming land in contested areas to create artificial islands with facilities that could potentially be for military use.

Images have emerged of work in multiple areas in the Spratly islands, which several nations claim.



'Elbowed aside'
The most recent images, from the Centre for Strategic and International Studies, showed work on Mischief reef.

The think tank published before-and-after satellite pictures showing man-made islands with runways and harbours, and Chinese vessels dredging sand on to the reef.

Asked about the issue during a visit to Jamaica, Mr Obama said the views of smaller claimant nations had to be considered.

"Where we get concerned with China is where it is not necessarily abiding by international norms and rules, and is using its sheer size and muscle to force countries into subordinate positions," he said.'

"We think this can be solved diplomatically, but just because the Philippines or Vietnam are not as large as China doesn't mean that they can just be elbowed aside."

Hours earlier, China gave one of its most detailed comments on the issue at a foreign ministry daily press briefing.

Spokeswoman Hua Chunying said (transcript in Chinese) that China had "indisputable rights" to the Spratly islands, and that it was only "protecting the country's national sovereignty and maritime rights".

The construction was to serve troops protecting the area and civilian activity such as search and rescue operations, scientific research and commercial fishing, she said.

"The structures... do not affect, nor are they targeted at, any particular country," she said, adding that China would "continue to strengthen" its activities in the area.

Rupert Wingfield-Hayes: China's Island Factory

I stare out at the endless rolling waves. On the horizon the sky is dark and threatening. Then my eye is caught by something sticking up above the waves. It looks like an oil or gas-drilling platform. What on earth is it doing here?

As we get closer, to my right, I am sure I can now see something pale and sandy beside the platform. "That looks like land!" I say. It can't be. I look at my GPS.

There is no land marked anywhere near here, only a submerged reef of the Spratly Island chain. But my eyes are not deceiving me. A few kilometres away I can now clearly see the outline of an island.

In recent days, several senior US officials have weighed in on China's land reclamation work, warning it raises regional tensions.

The commander of the US Pacific fleet, Adm Harry Harris, said in a speech in Australia last week that China was "creating a great wall of sand with dredges and bulldozers".
He said that work to date had created more than 4 sq km (1.5 sq miles) of artificial land mass.

US Navy Lt Cmdr Wilson VornDick wrote in an analysis on the CSIS website: "It appears that China's building projects are part of an expansive territorial grab or to make China's disputed Nine-Dash Line claim a reality."

The Nine-Dash line is a boundary which China uses to demarcate its claims in the South China Sea. It is not recognised outside China.

The row has already led to conflict. When China placed an oil rig in waters claimed by Vietnam last year, anti-China riots erupted.

The Philippines has filed a complaint with UN's Permanent Court of Arbitration - but China says it will not engage with the case.
Obama: China 'using muscle' to dominate in South China Sea - BBC News
Maybe tt is time for the US to be spurred into stitching together the Strategic Alliance in the Pacific Rim and take on China.

Likewise, economic sanction maybe thought of by those affected and they and could break relationship with China and isolate it from Asia.

China maybe thus socially otracised.

A country may have a huge economy and humming industries, but if it does not have a market, then it will be up for deep trouble.
 

Zeratul

Regular Member
Joined
Apr 8, 2015
Messages
55
Likes
1
falkland is claim by UK, hawii is part of US, so does guam. daiyu island is part of japan, yet its closer to taiwan. distance is never really a factor here.

by history daiyu island should be part of taiwan or china. and china has ScS record in 1500's
The USA Government never said the diaoyu island's sovereignty belong to japan, only the rule rights.
you say "distance is never really a factor here" , yes , you are right. so we says South China Sea land reclamation 'justified'. It's our own island.
 
Last edited:

Zeratul

Regular Member
Joined
Apr 8, 2015
Messages
55
Likes
1
Maybe tt is time for the US to be spurred into stitching together the Strategic Alliance in the Pacific Rim and take on China.

Likewise, economic sanction maybe thought of by those affected and they and could break relationship with China and isolate it from Asia.

China maybe thus socially otracised.

A country may have a huge economy and humming industries, but if it does not have a market, then it will be up for deep trouble.
China will have the biggest market in the world. Next ten years , we will provide the huge market for neighboring countries and area.
 

Ray

The Chairman
Professional
Joined
Apr 17, 2009
Messages
43,133
Likes
23,788
China will have the biggest market in the world. Next ten years , we will provide the huge market for neighboring countries and area.
Indeed.

This will help you to realise how huge a market it is and will be for other countries

China's growth slows to 7% in the first quarter

China's economic growth slowed further in the three months to March this year, expanding 7% compared to a year earlier, its slowest pace since the global financial crisis in 2009.
China's growth slows to 7% in the first quarter - BBC News
Go beat your jungle drums!
 

Zeratul

Regular Member
Joined
Apr 8, 2015
Messages
55
Likes
1
Indeed.

This will help you to realise how huge a market it is and will be for other countries



Go beat your jungle drums!
Sorry ,What is the meaning of "Go beat your jungle drums!" ?
7% Growing , the second economic of the world. I think it's good.
 

Ray

The Chairman
Professional
Joined
Apr 17, 2009
Messages
43,133
Likes
23,788
Sorry ,What is the meaning of "Go beat your jungle drums!" ?
7% Growing , the second economic of the world. I think it's good.
Beat your jungle drum is ecstatic joy.


What is good is not really good since China wants to be an unstopping giant and the best in everything.

Reality facing them in the face and the fact that they are on the losing spectrum is very demoralising.
 
Last edited by a moderator:

Zeratul

Regular Member
Joined
Apr 8, 2015
Messages
55
Likes
1
Beat your jungle drum is ecstatic joy.


What is good is not really good since China wants to be an unstopping giant and the best in everything.

Reality facing them in the face and the fact that they are on the losing spectrum is very demoralising.
Well, just laughing at my opinion.

If India don't believe the Chinese economic , why join AIIB?

There are lots of cooperation space between India an China in the future.
 
Last edited by a moderator:

Compersion

Senior Member
Joined
May 6, 2013
Messages
2,220
Likes
831
Country flag
On AIIB i had a thought is it like a climate change forum test ... Make the person stand all out in front on his own on purpose and specific focus ... the AIIB will be a strict test and the world economies would be there monitoring and evaluating and criticizing. It would be a shame if [x] left and even question the performance. AIIB is not about money but about coordination and processes and motive. It would have been wiser to start the BRICS bank first (a smaller concentrated group) and learn and develop and India + others would have put in place something useful. The way it is going AIIB > ADB.

In climate change when that person was on its own he could not take it and ran and begged for support from India !! Wish PRC learn that India can help and assist and no embarrassment and shame in it. the people of PRC i am sure if ask them specifically will not understand i am sure why PRC has such concentrated discomfort against India and why cannot work together (is PRC envious of the role India can take and make others see). AIIB needs coordination and cannot have PRC + allies go on its own.

For example PRC rejected North Korea:

The Asian Infrastructure Investment Bank: The infrastructure gap | The Economist

'No way North Korea' — DPRK refused entry to China-led AIIB | Emerging Markets
 

Ray

The Chairman
Professional
Joined
Apr 17, 2009
Messages
43,133
Likes
23,788
Well, just laughing at my opinion.

If India don't believe the Chinese economic , why join AIIB?

There are lots of cooperation space between India an China in the future.
Just to be with the Joneses.
 

Latest Replies

Global Defence

New threads

Articles

Top