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Armand2REP

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Related to what?
You've been called out on your bullshit a few times now, you're just gonna spew stupid stuff out again?
Its more to do with the unaffordable, under armed LCS ships than anything else.
They have finally decided to arm them with 8 NSM and are probably on the first deployment after the upgrade.
Even now, they are underarmed as compared to 054a and just as good as two 056, having no anti air capability but CIWS.
No one has called my facts as false. Having a submarine rescue ship dispatching from Russia two days after the event is coincidence? Having an LCS operating within 100 miles at the same time a radiation incident is detected is coincidence? How many coincidence do you need before it is fact?
 

Bhurki

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Having an LCS operating within 100 miles at the same time a radiation incident is detected is coincidence?
LCS is corvette. It being anywhere doesn't mean anything. USN conducts FONOPS every month through SCS and every couple of months through Taiwan Strait. This time they just chose a smaller ship instead of the regular DDG.
Radiation detection has already been proven false.
 

Armand2REP

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LCS is corvette. It being anywhere doesn't mean anything. USN conducts FONOPS every month through SCS and every couple of months through Taiwan Strait. This time they just chose a smaller ship instead of the regular DDG.
Radiation detection has already been proven false.
The Gabby Giffords is equipped with Thales CAPTAS 4, the world's best towed sonar. It is designed to hunt submarines. The ABs do not have this submarine detection capability. All USN vessels are equipped with NBC sensors.
 

MIDKNIGHT FENERIR-00

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A falling rocket booster just completely flattened a building in China
Despite how easy it is to prevent, China continues to allow launch debris to rain down on rural towns and threaten people’s safety.

by Neel V. Patel
Nov 27, 2019


A Long March 3B launch from the Xichang Satellite Launch Center.
XINHUA

Last Saturday, China launched a pair of satellites into orbit from its Xichang Satellite Launch Center. On social media, however, the main event was what happened on Earth: a booster from the launch smashed right into a building in the country’s rural south-central region. No one was injured, but videos and photos of the incident showed wreckage left in the booster’s wake, with toxic rocket fuel evaporating.

This is the aftermath downrange following a Chinese Long March 3B launch from Xichang early Saturday. And that yellow smoke is very toxic hypergolic propellant. Source: https://t.co/VEh5X8Ors0pic.twitter.com/22IVIpyJOk

— Andrew Jones (@AJ_FI) November 23, 2019
It’s the latest incident in China’s long history with falling rocket parts causing destruction below. The most infamous crash occurred in 1996, when the first Long March 3B launch saw the rocket veer off course and crash into a village, killing an unknown number of people (possibly hundreds, by some Western estimates).

ℹhttps://t.co/vY0CEN4CFYpic.twitter.com/Rdyq4fOMxI

— LaunchStuff (@LaunchStuff) November 23, 2019
“Any time you have stuff going up, there’s a possibility it’s going to come down where you don’t plan for it,” says Victoria Samson at the Secure World Foundation. “So there’s a reason why you don’t fire over populated land.” That’s why most countries launch over water.

So why doesn’t China? “This entire issue is down to geography,” says Thomas Roberts, a former aerospace security fellow at the Center for Strategic and International Studies. All three of China’s main spaceports are located in the mainland, including the Xichang site. They all save money by flying missions east (which requires less fuel to get into space), but that route takes them over vulnerable populations.

severe organ failure or cancer), the wreckage could pollute nearby rivers and streams used for irrigation and drinking water. Launches from the Soviet Union’s old Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan, built in 1955, have caused more than 2,500 tons of debris to rain down on the surrounding region, leading to health problems for thousands.

So the issue isn’t new, but the space industry is expanding rapidly. “The more launches you have, the more chances you have for something to go wrong,” says Samson.

Luckily, the solutions aren’t complicated—they just require political will. China can launch over the water if it wants, through its spaceport on the island of Hainan in the South China Sea. Operational since 2014, it’s been seldom used because of launch failures and a less developed infrastructure. But these issues are fixable with enough investment.

China could also just change its flight paths. For example, Israel’s Palmachim Airbase can’t launch to the east because of obvious geopolitical conflicts. So it sends rockets over the Mediterranean Sea and through the Strait of Gibraltar. This requires putting a satellite in a retrograde orbit—one that moves in the opposite direction of Earth’s rotation. This requires much more fuel, but it entirely avoids populated areas.

And some emerging technologies might enable rockets to fly over populated areas more safely. Grid fins (lattice structures that can slightly modify control and speed) and parafoil features (aluminum foils that work like kites or parachutes), like those SpaceX uses, could help steer falling rocket boosters to vacant lands. Roberts thinks AI could one day be used to better assess downrange risks to communities before launch. One proposal led by SpaceX calls for building a flight corridor heading south that would fly rockets over populated areas as long as they can demonstrate a perfectly functional automated abort feature.

There’s one very cheap tool that could increase pressure on China and other groups to take steps to mitigate launch debris hazards: social media. Weibo and Twitter helped make images and videos of the latest crash go viral––a massive boon to the poor, rural victims, who are rarely seen or heard.
 

RAM

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China developing secret weapon that can hit targets 500m deep in sea

HIGHLIGHTS




    • China is working on a laser device to target ships, submarines
    • Once developed, Chinese device can bombard laser beams on submarines
    • China has increased its influence in Indian Ocean in recent times
China is working on a dual-purpose laser-equipped satellite. Launched in May this year, Project Guanlan is aimed at gaining Chinese control of oceanic traffic surveillance and acquiring ability to hit at submarines of rival naval forces. Guanlan in Mandarin means "watching the big waves".

It is an ambitious project as the US and Russia have failed in the past to acquire control over the technology that China is now trying to master. For about a century, the researchers have been trying to develop a device to hit submarines using LIDAR (light detection and ranging) technology.

Both the US and Russia achieved success in penetrating 100 metres from the surface of the sea. But this is not enough as most of the efficient navies use submarines that operate at the depth of 500 metres.

In recent times, some success has been achieved in NASA funded research projects. A laser device was developed by the Defence Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA). It was mounted on a spy plane, which could hit targets up to 200-metre depth in sea - still about 300 metres short of the target zone.



Why it is revolutionary

Laser bombardment of a target at 500-metre depth has remained a dream for the advance weapon developing researchers. China is trying to realise this dream. The Chinese device is being developed by the scientists working at the Pilot National Laboratory for Marine Science and Technology in Qingdao, Shandong on the eastern coast of China.

The researchers submitted a plan to the Chinese government last year or early this year giving details of how such a device could be developed. Work on the project began in May this year after Xi Jinping government decided to provide funds for the same. This device, once ready, could be mounted on a plane as well as surveillance satellites of China.

The laser bombing of a submarine has been difficult as the intensity of light beams weakens about 1000 times of its strength in atmosphere. Sunrays don't go more than 200 metres deep in the oceanic water.

Laser rays could be up to a billion times powerful than the sunrays. However, their deviation in water needs to be controlled for accuracy and required penetration through oceanic water.

Once complete, Project Guanlan of China would give the country the power to manipulate oceanic traffic - both civil and military. China may emerge as the data centre for all kinds of marine activity across the globe.

Development of this technology may prove to be a game-changer in geo-strategic one-upmanship competition as the existing radar technology doesn't provide enough information about movements of ships and submarines.
Why India Should Be Concerned?

Project Guanlan presents a fresh challenge to India's strategic interests. China is the most formidable neighbour of India sharing nearly 3,000 km border in the north. China has been trying to gain some hold in the waters surrounding India.

The so-called "string of pearls" project of China is aimed at encircling India. China has increased its presence in the Indian Ocean in recent years. It has got its strategic assets in Myanmar, Sri Lanka, the Maldives, Djibouti and Pakistan. Growing Chinese influence over the Maldives in recent months has been clearly noticeable.

India conducts majority of its trade through maritime transport. According to the Ministry of Shipping, around 95 per cent of India's trading by volume and 70 per cent by value is done through maritime transport.

Development of laser device, mountable on surveillance satellite and spy planes, may present a serious challenge to the security interests of India and countries China considers as its rivals.

https://www.indiatoday.in/world/sto...eapon-submarines-satellite-1354033-2018-10-02
 
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smooth manifold

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correction:
this is the 8th 071. it has no pennant number yet.


the 7th 071 has pennant number 986 and is next to 075's stern.
Weibo source: the seventh Type 071 LPD 986 Siming Shan(literal meaning: Mountain of Four Enlightenments) left Hudong shipyard yesterday and is expected to be in commission soon.
 

Bhurki

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China Y9 Special Purpose aircraft production
( Medevac, Awacs, ASW, transport)
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ELMPoxXWkAAcQXH.jpeg
ELMA9uSUcAAMzLC.jpeg
ELMA9uSUcAE_BJH.jpeg
 

asianobserve

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No one has called my facts as false. Having a submarine rescue ship dispatching from Russia two days after the event is coincidence? Having an LCS operating within 100 miles at the same time a radiation incident is detected is coincidence? How many coincidence do you need before it is fact?
Could it be another Russian submarine incident? Russia of late has been trying to inject itself in the Pacifoc region.
 

asianobserve

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The Gabby Giffords is equipped with Thales CAPTAS 4, the world's best towed sonar. It is designed to hunt submarines. The ABs do not have this submarine detection capability. All USN vessels are equipped with NBC sensors.
I think the final Anti-Submarine Warfare module for LCS is Raytheon's DART system. And the USN already took final delivery of its last ASW module for its LCS class.

https://www.navy.mil/submit/display.asp?story_id=107995

https://mobile.navaltoday.com/2018/...ssion-package-reaches-two-testing-milestones/

This is its initial configuration. Cost escalations had lead to a lot of packages being axed off. Hence, the need for haphazard NSM addition.
There's no indication the LCS ships carry it at present.
LCS is a modular system. It has Anti-surface module, which the NSM is a part off and it has ASW module, etc. These are swappable modules. And as quoted above the USN already completed delivery of its ASW modules for the LCS.

In any case, there is not much credible source yet to make a sure conclusion of Chinese nuclear powered sub sinking or nuke weapon testing in the SCS. If there is all international news outlet will plaster it on its headlines.

If the sinking of a conventional Argentinian sub was a big deal then the sinking of a Chinese nuke sub would even be a bigger deal. Most likely if any nuke Chinese sub sinks then it will be an SSBN type. There would therefore be Worldwide repercussion due to massive loss of life and most especially due to the nuke warheads on board.
 
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smooth manifold

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https://www.washingtontimes.com/news/2019/dec/24/china-tests-submarine-launched-jl-3-missile-capabl/



China's test of sub-launched missile a threat to peace, retired captain warns

China’s military this week conducted a flight test of a new submarine-launched missile capable of hitting the entire United States with a nuclear warhead, according to Pentagon officials.

The test firing of China’s new JL-3 submarine-launched ballistic missile took place Sunday in the Bohai Sea off the coast of northern China, from a submerged Jin-class ballistic missile submarine, said two defense officials familiar with reports of the launch who spoke on condition of anonymity.

The missile firing was monitored by U.S. intelligence satellites and other platforms from a position in the same sea and was monitored on a flight path westward.

No other details of the launch were disclosed, including whether the missile test was successful.

Pentagon spokesman Lt. Col. David W. Eastburn said he had no information on the launch.

The Chinese launch followed reports that U.S. intelligence agencies are on alert for an anticipated long-range missile test by North Korea.

North Korea’s government has announced it was planning to conduct some type of provocative action coinciding with the Christmas or New Year’s holiday.

A U.S. official said the Trump administration is prepared to take harsh action against North Korea if Pyongyang ends its moratorium on long-range missile tests. The official did not elaborate.

China — during talks in Beijing between U.S. Special Envoy for North Korea Stephen E. Biegun and Chinese officials.

The JL-3 is part of a major building of Chinese strategic nuclear forces that includes the new submarine missile, new land-based missiles, including the multi-warhead DF-41, and development of a new strategic bomber and upgrading of older nuclear-capable aircraft.
 

smooth manifold

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https://www.washingtontimes.com/news/2019/dec/24/china-tests-submarine-launched-jl-3-missile-capabl/

China's test of sub-launched missile a threat to peace, retired captain warns

China’s military this week conducted a flight test of a new submarine-launched missile capable of hitting the entire United States with a nuclear warhead, according to Pentagon officials.

The test firing of China’s new JL-3 submarine-launched ballistic missile took place Sunday in the Bohai Sea off the coast of northern China, from a submerged Jin-class ballistic missile submarine, said two defense officials familiar with reports of the launch who spoke on condition of anonymity.

The missile firing was monitored by U.S. intelligence satellites and other platforms from a position in the same sea and was monitored on a flight path westward.

No other details of the launch were disclosed, including whether the missile test was successful.

Pentagon spokesman Lt. Col. David W. Eastburn said he had no information on the launch.

The Chinese launch followed reports that U.S. intelligence agencies are on alert for an anticipated long-range missile test by North Korea.

North Korea’s government has announced it was planning to conduct some type of provocative action coinciding with the Christmas or New Year’s holiday.

A U.S. official said the Trump administration is prepared to take harsh action against North Korea if Pyongyang ends its moratorium on long-range missile tests. The official did not elaborate.

China — during talks in Beijing between U.S. Special Envoy for North Korea Stephen E. Biegun and Chinese officials.

The JL-3 is part of a major building of Chinese strategic nuclear forces that includes the new submarine missile, new land-based missiles, including the multi-warhead DF-41, and development of a new strategic bomber and upgrading of older nuclear-capable aircraft.
 

xizhimen

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A Whopping 20 Y-20 Airlifters Seen At Chinese Aircraft Plant And Test Base
The activity at Yanliang Air Base is yet another glaring reminder that Beijing's military might seems to be on a nearly exponential growth curve.
BY TYLER ROGOWAYDECEMBER 30, 2019



Xi'an Aircraft Company, which makes China's most prominent large aircraft, among other responsibilities, has its primary plant located at the sprawling Yanliang Air Base that also houses China's Flight Test Establishment, as well as academic institutions that deal with aircraft design. Beyond being a strategic production line for China's aerospace industry, the installation supports testing for the vast majority of aircraft within the People's Liberation Army's stable and executes avionics and other systems integration work for those aircraft. As of late, Xi'an has been building China a fleet of airlifters that can help make its geopolitical aspirations abroad a reality, as well as providing updated long-range bombers to support its emerging anti-access military strategy.

In a high-resolution satellite image we exclusively obtained from Planet Labs that was taken just 48 hours ago, the breakneck pace of Y-20 strategic transport production is abundantly clear. The photo of the base includes no less than 20 Y-20s, the most we have ever seen at the installation based on a number of high-resolution images available for review that span a number of years.

Although it is far less exciting than its indigenous fighter jet counterparts, the Xi'an Y-20 is just as, if not more important, when it comes to China realizing its extra-territorial ambitions. Being able to haul outsized loads over international distances with an aircraft that does not rely primarily on support from foreign entities gives Beijing the high-speed logistical reach it needs to support its growing number of bases and military engagements far beyond the Chinese mainland. In other words, the Y-20 is essential to China's core foreign policy and defense strategy.


Like many Chinese military aircraft designs, the main limitation for the Y-20, which is loosely analogous to the C-17, remains its engines, which are currently Russian low-bypass Soloviev D-30KP-2 turbofans. The goal is to equip the type with the indigenous WS-20 high-bypass turbofan that will allow the aircraft design to reach its maximum potential and rid the type of any significant foreign dependence. Flight testing is underway to do just that, but the WS-20 isn't slated for production until 2024, and that is just an estimated timetable. Regardless, the fact that China is punching these airlifters out at a seemingly dizzying rate underlines its foreign policy objectives and the growing might of the Chinese military overall. Also, it is worth noting that the U.S. no longer has a strategic airlifter in production after shuttering the C-17 plant in Long Beach after the last C-17 rolled off its line in 2015.


Also seen scattered about the base are 17 Xi'an H-6 bombers. Now in its drastically upgraded H-6K form, along with its derivatives, these bombers, which draw their design lineage from the 1950s Soviet Badger, are the backbone of the People's Liberation Army's long-range aviation enterprise and perform a large variety of roles beyond traditional bomber and cruise missile delivery missions. These include acting as the mothership for outsized high-speed drones and massive air-launched ballistic missiles. Until China's stealthy bombers come online in the future, the H-6 will represent the tip of the airborne strategic spear for the PLA and clearly Beijing is investing in the platform accordingly.


The images also shows four KJ-500 airborne early warning and control (AEW&C) aircraft that will bolster China's growing radar plane fleet. The aircraft are huge force multipliers to the country's fighters and ground and sea-based air defense systems. A fifth AEW&C aircraft can be seen on the northwestern portion of the base tucked into a corner. It appears to be a testbed aircraft that uses a Y-7 twin-engine turboprop transport as a platform. This test aircraft is supposedly designated JZY-01 and you can read more about it here.


Another unique resident that calls the base home is China's own "Catfish" testbed jet used for avionics development for the J-20 in a similar fashion to how Boeing used its first production 757 for a similar cause in developing and sustaining the F-22 Raptor. That aircraft, which you can read our full profile on here, is seen at the far eastern edge of the ramp. To the north of the general eastern ramp area, it appears that construction is underway to add more hangar facilities along the huge flight line.


Beyond that, an array of other turboprop aircraft, most notably Xi'an MA60s and Y-7s, as well as light aircraft and fighters, are also present. The fighter contingent ranges from antique Shenyang J-6s to newer Flanker derivatives, such as the J-11. The base has a rotating assortment of front-line fighter visitors that go there for testing and systems integration work. Handfuls of J-10s and J-20s occupying parts of the ramp are not uncommon.


 

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