World military strength, a comparison

santosh10

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sipri.org/
SIPRI - The 15 countries with the highest military expenditure in 2012

Figures for military spending calculated using purchasing power parity (PPP), ($ b., PPP)

1. United States- $682bn
2. China- $249bn
3. India- $119bn
4. Russia- $116.0bn
5. Saudi Arabia- $63.9bn
6. United Kingdom- $57.5bn
7. France- $50.7bn
8. Japan- $46.0bn
9. South Korea- $44.2bn
10. Germany- $42.8bn
11. Brazil- $34.4bn
12. Italy- $31.0bn
13. Turkey- $25.9bn
14. Canada- $18.3bn
15. Australia- $16.3bn

sipri.org/research/armaments/milex/Top%2015%20table%202012.pdf
sipri.org/research/armaments/milex/Top%2015%20table%202012.pdf

=> a The figures for national military expenditure as a share of GDP are based on estimates for 2012 GDP
from the International Monetary Fund's (IMF) World Economic Outlook database, Oct. 2012.

b, The figures for military expenditure at PPP exchange rates are estimates based on the projected implied PPP conversion rates for each country from the IMF World Economic Outlook database, Oct. 2012. :thumb:

sipri.org/research/armaments/milex/recent-trends
 
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santosh10

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.
even if these analysis doesn't speak the ground reality, but we have something in this regard as below :ranger:

globalfirepower.com/countries-listing.asp
 

santosh10

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PPP is good in calculating Military expenditure, when weapons are purchased in the country, when weapons are purchased from outside, better throw PPP out of window.
one day we discussed it. Capital Expenditure of Indian Defence is around 40% of total expenditure, with around 50% to 70% of it is spent in buying foreign arms, considering the fact that most of the production line of the main arms like SU30mki, T90s, HAWK etc is in fact based in India itself. so this way we find around 90% of total Defence Expenditure is spent in India itself, somehow, some way

one gentleman also calculated the same as below :thumb:


The US doesn't use its budget only for protecting itself. Some of it goes into NATO and Japan. They are a completely offensive force, expeditionary if you want to call it so. Their defence budget is quite justified in that respect.

[idsa.in/idsacomments/IndiasDefenceBudget2012-13_LaxmanBehera_200312]India's Defence Budget 2012-13 | Institute for Defence Studies and Analyses[/url]

Capital expenditure is Rs 80000 crores this year. That roughly comes up to $15Billion today. Out of which 70% is used for import. That makes it around $10Billion. So, our PPP calculations can directly be used for the rest of the budget.

However, a significant aspect of our capital expenditure involves license production within India. So, quite a bit of that amount directly comes back to India to HAL, BEML, OFB, HVF and other manufacturers. Eg are T-90, MKI, Hawk etc which are big ticket deals. So, this is again calculated in PPP. Apart from that, offset clause implies a significant amount of the capital expenditure, at least 30%, comes back to India in the form of investment.

So, even if we consider half the amount comes back to India in some form or the other (actually much more), we can calculate PPP figures for at least 85%, if not 90%+, of our Defence budget.

Considering that, the table is pretty okay. Maybe we can say it is a little above Russia's budget.
 

santosh10

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Why Has India Become the World's Top Arms Buyer?

Defense Minister A.K. Antony poses with senior defense officials, in front of a Mi-17 V5 military utility transport helicopter from Russia, in New Delhi, Feb. 17, 2012.

India has replaced China as the world's largest arms buyer, accounting for 10 percent of all arms purchases during the past five years, a Swedish research group said.

India purchased some $12.7 billion in arms, 80 percent of that from Russia, during 2007-2011, according to the Stockholm International Peace Research Institute (SIPRI). China's arms purchases during that time were $6.3 billion, 78 percent of which came from Russia.


India has tried, but failed, to create a sizable domestic manufacturing industry for weapons or even basic military goods, while China has increased production of defense supplies. About 75 percent of India's weapons purchases came from imports during 2007-11, said Laxman Kumar Behra of the Institute of Defense Studies and Analysis, a government-funded research organization.

Some analysts in India attribute the failure to create a domestic defense industry to government involvement. "India's public sector is very inefficient and the private sector is by and large kept out of arms production," Mr. Behra said.

"We lack long-term vision," and a culture of research and development, Mr. Behra said. "The government keeps on forming one committee after the other but there is hardly any implementation" of the committee's recommendations, he said.

In a recent article in The Economic Times, Uday Bhaskar, a retired commodore and leading strategic analyst, also criticized India's weapons procurement policy.

"More than 60 years after becoming a republic and 50 years after the debacle with China, the opaque Indian defense production establishment does not produce high quality clothing and personal inventory items like boots, let alone a suitable rifle for a one million army, or tanks and aircraft."

Russia, the world's No. 2 weapons supplier in recent years after the United States, sold $7.8 billion in defense supplies in 2011, and $40.8 billion from 2005 to 2011. India bought about one-third of the supplies.

India's dependence on Russia is a holdover from the Cold War era, when the two were close allies.

South Korea was the second-largest arms importer from 2007 to 2011, with $7 billion in purchases. Pakistan and China followed, each accounting for about 5 percent of the world's total arms import during the five-year period, SIPRI said.

India's import of major weapons increased by 38 percent from the 2002-2006 period to the 2007-2011 period. India's main acquisitions over the past five years were 120 Sukhoi and 16 MiG-29 jet fighter aircraft from Russia and 20 Anglo-French Jaguar fighters.

India recently finalized a deal for 126 multi-role fighter aircraft with French defense contractor Rafael, in a deal worth $10 billion.

Why Has India Become the World's Top Arms Buyer? - NYTimes.com

//india.blogs.nytimes.com/2012/03/21/why-has-india-become-the-worlds-top-arms-buyer/?_r=0
 
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santosh10

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Ranking of countries by number of military and paramilitary personnel

State - Active Military - Reserve Military - Paramilitary - Total

People's Republic of China - 2,285,000 - 800,000 - 3,969,000 - 7,054,000

United States of America - 1,458,219 - 1,458,500 - 11,035 - 2,927,754

India - 1,325,000 - 1,155,000 - 2,288,407 - 4,768,407

Vietnam - 482,000 - 5,000,000 - 40,000 - 5,522,000 :ranger:

Russian Federation - 766,000 - 2,035,000 - 449,000 - 3,250,000

Pakistan - 617,000 - 513,000 - 304,000 - 1,434,000

Iran - 523,000 - 1,800,000 - 1,510,000 - 3,833,000

//en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_countries_by_number_of_military_and_paramilitary_personnel
 

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A Nuclear Triad refers to a nuclear arsenal which consists of three components, traditionally strategic bombers, ICBMs and submarine-launched ballistic missiles ( SLBMs). The purpose of having a three-branched nuclear capability is to significantly reduce the possibility that an enemy could destroy all of a nation's nuclear forces in a first-strike attack; this, in turn, ensures a credible threat of a second strike, and thus increases a nation's nuclear deterrence.[1][2][3]

Triad nuclear powers

The following nations are considered triad nuclear powers. They possess nuclear forces consisting of land-based missiles, ballistic or long-range cruise missile submarines, and strategic bombers or long-range tactical aircraft.

United States[1][3][4]
The US operates Minuteman ICBMs from underground hardened silos, Trident SLBMs carried by Ohio-class submarines, it also operates B-1, B-52, B-2 strategic bombers, as well as land- and carrier-based tactical aircraft, some capable of carrying strategic and tactical B61 and large strategic B83 gravity bombs, AGM-86 ALCM, and AGM-129 Advanced Cruise Missiles. While the US no longer keeps nuclear armed bombers on airborne alert it has the ability to do so along with the airborne nuclear command and control aircraft with its fleet of KC-10 and KC-135 aerial refueling planes. The US Navy also retains reserve stocks of undeployed nuclear warheads to equip existing Tomahawk ship or submarine-launched cruise missiles. Previous to development of submarine-launched ballistic missiles the US Navy strategic nuclear role was provided by aircraft carrier–based bombers and for a short time submarine-launched cruise missiles. With the end of the cold war, the US never deployed the rail mobile version of the Peacekeeper ICBM or the road mobile Midgetman small ICBM. The US destroyed its stock of road mobile Pershing II IRBMs and ground-launched cruise missiles in accordance with the INF treaty. The US also has shared strategic nuclear weapons and still deploys shared tactical nuclear weapons to some NATO countries.

Russia
Also a nuclear power,[5] Russia inherited the arsenal of all of the former Soviet states; this consists of silo-based as well as rail and road mobile ICBMs, sea-based SLBMs, strategic bombers, strategic aerial refueling aircraft, and long-range tactical aircraft capable of carrying gravity bombs, standoff missiles, and cruise missiles. The Russian Strategic Rocket Forces have ICBMs able to deliver nuclear warheads[citation needed], silo-based R-36M2 (SS-18), silo-based UR-100N (SS-19), mobile RT-2PM "Topol" (SS-25), silo-based RT-2UTTH "Topol M" (SS-27), mobile RT-2UTTH "Topol M" (SS-27), mobile RS-24 "Yars" (SS-29) (Future replacement for R-36 & UR-100N missiles). Russian strategic nuclear submarine forces are equipped with the following SLBM's, R-29R "Vysota", NATO name SS-N-18 "Stingray", RSM-54 R-29RMU "Sineva", NATO name SS-N-23 "Skiff" and the R-29RMU2.1 "Liner" are in use with the Delta class submarine, but the RSM-56 R-30 "Bulava", NATO name SS-NX-32 is under development for the Borei class submarine. The Russian Air Force operates supersonic Tupolev Tu-22M, and Tupolev Tu-160 bombers and the long range turboprop powered Tupolev Tu-95, they are all mostly armed with strategic stand off missiles or cruise missiles such as the KH-15 and the KH-55. These bombers and nuclear capable strike aircraft such as the Sukhoi Su-24 are supported by Ilyushin Il-78 aerial refuelling aircraft. The USSR was required to destroy its stock of IRBMs in accordance with the INF treaty.

People's Republic of China
Unlike the US and Russia where strategic nuclear forces are enumerated by treaty limits and subject to verification, China, a nuclear power since 1964, is not subject to these requirements but may have a triad structure of some sort. China's nuclear force is much smaller than the US or Russia and is closer in number and capability to that of France or the UK. This force is mainly land-based missiles including ICBMs, IRBMs, and tactical ballistic missiles as well as cruise missiles. Unlike the US and Russia, China stores many of its missiles in huge underground tunnel complexes; US Representative Michael Turner[6] referring to 2009 Chinese media reports said "This network of tunnels could be in excess of 5,000 kilometers (3,110 miles), and is used to transport nuclear weapons and forces,",[7] the Chinese Army newsletter calls this tunnel system an underground Great Wall of China.[8] China has one inactive Type 092 submarine,[9] after its twin was lost at sea and is working on several new Type 094 submarines carrying SLBMs although the reliability of the new type is also in question[10] in addition the single type 94 boat has not received its SLBM's.[9] There is an aging bomber force consisting of Xian H-6s with an unclear nuclear delivery role as well as several tactical aircraft types that could be equipped with nuclear weapons. The PLAF has a limited capability fleet of H-6 bombers modified for aerial refuelling as well as forthcoming Russian Ilyushin Il-78 aerial refuelling tankers.[11]

India
ndia is close to deploying a nuclear triad.[12][13] India maintains a no first use nuclear policy and has been developing a nuclear triad capability as a part of its credible minimum deterrence doctrine.[14] India's nuclear-weapons program possesses surface-to-surface missiles such as the Agni II and Agni III. In addition, the 5,000 km range Agni-V ICBM was also tested on 19 April 2012 which is believed to have a range of 5,000 - 8,000 km [15] and is expected to enter service by 2014.[16] India's nuclear-weapons program possesses surface-to-air missiles like the Akash. India has nuclear-capable fighter aircraft such as the Dassault Mirage 2000H, Sukhoi Su-30 MKI, MIG-29, SEPECAT Jaguar and HAL Tejas. Land and air strike capabilities are already in place under the control of Strategic Forces Command which is a part of Nuclear Command Authority (India). India operates a nuclear-powered missile submarine, INS Arihant, it is designed for strategic deterrence and research and will carry nuclear-tipped SLBMs.[17] DRDO, is working on the short range Sagarika, a submarine-launched ballistic missile which can be target as far as 750 km.[18] The missile was successfully tested for the fourteenth time on January 27, 2013 in the Bay of Bengal. The missile is expected to provide India with an initial sea-based nuclear capability. Also, K-4, with a range of about 5000 km and a part of the K Missile family,[19][20] has commenced testing in March 2014.[21][22]

Nuclear triad - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

//en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nuclear_triad
 
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santosh10

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For Rs 6 lakh crore (USD 100 billion)Indian armed forces set to acquire Star Wars-like weapons
Jun 27 2013

Seeking to prepare itself for futuristic warfare of the kind seen in the iconic and sensational Star Wars movies, Indian armed forces are planning to spend around Rs 6 lakh crore to get hi-tech equipment such as robots for combat roles, precision-guided missiles and watch-dog satellites, according to a Defence Ministry document. :thumb:

In the document 'Technology and Capability Roadmap' for the armed forces for next 15 years, Defence Minister A K Antony has also made it clear that his department will make these acquisitions in a holistic manner "without compromising transparency, fairness and probity at any level."

"In the next 15 years, Indian forces are poised for major modernisation... The volumes are high and the financial outlays large. There is substantial scope in the process for Indian industry to harness this market around USD 100 billion (Rs six lakh crore) to develop indigenous capability; especially in high technology areas," it said. The TCR has been provided by the Ministry as a step to provide a roadmap to the private and public sector indigenous industry about the requirements of the armed forces so that they can gear up themselves to provide the solutions.

"The document is being put up in the public domain to establish a level playing field for the Indian defence industry, both public and private sector," the Ministry said. In the field of space, the TCR says the armed forces would require "watchdog satellites" to guard against the anti-satellite weapons, which have been developed by China.

"With the advent of anti-satellite weapons (ASAT) a concept of `watchdog satellites to guard other satellites could also be explored," it said.The armed forces are also turning eco-friendly and have sought "eco-friendly solar, wind and electric power and propulsion systems which are capable of lowering fuel consumption, reduce pollution and better energy efficient while helping vessels to operate quietly." Seeking artificial warriors on field, the TCR said for winning land battles, the Army would need "Robots to assist troops in combat for tasks such as surveillance, reconnaissance, anti mine and anti IED role, urban area combat and casualty extraction."

To deal with the threat of enemy ballistic missiles, the 45-page TCR says a capability called Joint Area Missile Defence would be required for air defence. "It will use air defence assets of the three services in conjunction with the surveillance sensors of other agencies to detect, track, acquire and destroy incoming theatre ballistic and cruise missiles," it said. Seeking capabilities to fight the menace of terrorism, the TCR said capabilities will have to to be developed to oppose terrorism throughout the threat spectrum including anti-terrorism and counter-terrorism.

"It includes protection of personnel, assault, explosives detection and disposal, investigative sciences and forensics, physical security and protection of infrastructure and surveillance and collection. Successful execution of the wide range of R&D efforts will greatly improve the capability of the soldier," it said. The document, which is similar to a previous document issued in 2010, also envisages procurement of modern combat aircraft, combat drones, unmanned underwater systems, space-based capability, anti-submarine weapons launched from air, several types of Unmanned Aerial Vehicles and training tools for the forces in next 15 years.

For Rs 6 lakh crore, Indian armed forces set to acquire Star Wars-like weapons - Indian Express

//archive.indianexpress.com/news/for-rs-6-lakh-crore-indian-armed-forces-set-to-acquire-star-warslike-weapons/1134744/0
 

santosh10

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India's new Navy chief pilots 'blue-water' strategy
2012-09-27

India's new Navy chief sits at the helm of an emergent, "blue-water navy" strategically positioning the country's stated aspirations to command a dominant role in the Indian Ocean.

Admiral Devendra Kumar Joshi, 58, replaced retiring Navy chief Admiral Nirmal Kumar Verma on Aug. 31. India's Navy has 123 ships and 11 submarines.

Blue-water navy refers to the ability to exercise sea control at wide ranges. Specifically, the term describes a "maritime force capable of sustained operation across open oceans, project power from the home country and usually includes one or more aircraft carriers," according to U.S. Defense Security.

Naval build up expected

A total of 46 new war ships and submarines are under construction and about 15 are expected to be added to the fleet during Joshi's three-year tenure. :tup:

Projects slated for the next three years include a Russian-built aircraft carrier, U.S.-built long-range reconnaissance planes, an indigenous nuclear-powered submarine under construction, and a dedicated naval satellite.

The new ships and submarines will add to India's presence as a maritime power and reinforce its capabilities on the high seas.

India's maritime activity is gaining world recognition, marking the period as the country's biggest naval power increase since independence from Britain in 1947.

Visiting India in June, U.S. Secretary of Defense Leon E. Panetta said, "In terms of regional security, our vision is a peaceful Indian Ocean region supported by growing Indian capabilities.

"India is one of the largest and most dynamic countries in the region. "¦ India is at the crossroads of Asia, the crossroads of the new global economy, and at the crossroads of regional security. We will stand with India at those crossroads."

Developments during Joshi's tenure will be watched from both sides of the Pacific Ocean.

Anti-submarine warfare specialist at the helm

Joshi, who was commissioned in 1974, is the 21st chief of the Navy since the country's independence. He is a specialist in anti-submarine warfare and has served in command, staff and instructional appointments.

His experience includes a stint in warship production and acquisition as the assistant controller of the Aircraft Carrier Program [ACCP]. He then worked at the "Operations Branch," first as an assistant chief of naval staff [Information Warfare and Operations] and then as deputy chief of naval staff. Notably, Joshi has been the commander-in-chief of the Andaman and Nicobar Command, the only tri-service integrated command in India.

He went on to serve as the chief of Integrated Defence Staff and was the Flag Officer Commanding-in-Chief of the Western Naval Command at Mumbai. He served as the defense adviser in the Indian High Commission at Singapore from 1996 to 1999.

A native of Dehradun in the northern state of Uttarakhand, Joshi studied at Hansraj College in New Delhi. He graduated from the U.S. Naval War College in Rhode Island and attended the National Defense College in New Delhi.

Joshi is requesting not only changes to hardware, but infrastructure as well, saying, "We would need to professionally re-audit, train and consolidate preparedness."

Overall expansion plan

In addition to the 46 ships under construction, "acceptance of necessity" for 49 more ships and submarines has been approved by the Indian government. The vessels under construction include an aircraft carrier to be constructed in India along with destroyers, corvettes and six submarines to be constructed in France.

The first to be added to the fleet will be new warships of the existing "Delhi Class" destroyers, starting early next year. The ships feature improved stealth features and weapons. Also under construction are eight new landing craft utility [LCUs] vessels, used in amphibious warfare to augment the fleet in the Andaman and Nicobar Islands, Bay of Bengal.

The Navy commissioned 15 ships in the past three years, including four stealth frigates, two fleet tankers and eight water jet fast attack craft [WJFAC]. Future plans include a deep submergence and rescue vessel [DSRV], six additional submarines, four Landing Platform Docks and 16 shallow-water anti-submarine warfare [ASW] ships. :tup:

Last month the Navy issued a request for proposals [RFP] to acquire 56 naval utility helicopters customized for surveillance, anti-submarine warfare, anti-terror, electronic intelligence gathering and search-and-rescue operations. The RFP, which may result in U.S. $1 billion in purchases, has been sent to leading U.S., European and Russian helicopter makers. The Navy has more than 100 helicopters.

Another aircraft carrier on sea trial

India is set to be a two-carrier Navy at the end of the year. [China will catch up soon with one aircraft carrier constructed in Ukraine and undergoing sea trials.] India's new carrier is a refitted Russian craft previously named Admiral Gorshkov. Renamed Indian Naval Ship [INS] Vikramaditya, the vessel has gone through a U.S. $2.35 billion refit program and will have Russian-built MiG 29K fighters flying off its deck. The 49,130-ton carrier started a four-month sea trial in June in the Barents Sea and is slated to join the fleet by the end of the year.

The other carrier, the INS Viraat, is set to be phased out by 2017 and replaced by another carrier being built at a state-owned shipyard in Kochi, Kerala, on India's western seaboard.

Meanwhile, India says the INS Arihant, "the slayer of enemies," will be sea-launched soon. The 6,614-ton nuclear submarine will provide second-strike capability in response to a potential initial enemy nuclear strike. Modeled on the Russian Akula class submarine design, the Arihant is being constructed at Vishakapatnam on the east coast of India.

At an August news conference, Verma, the then-navy chief, said: "Arihant is steadily progressing towards operationalization, and we hope to commence sea trials in the coming months. "¦ Navy is poised to complete the [nuclear] triad, and our maritime and nuclear doctrines will then be aligned to ensure our nuclear insurance comes from the sea."

Long-range reconnaissance aircraft

In November 2008 terrorists used the sea route to reach Mumbai on India's west coast to launch an attack, killing 166 people. In response, the Indian government approved the purchase of 12 long-range reconnaissance planes, the P-8I, produced by Boeing. The first is slated to arrive in January 2013. India operates the Russian origin IL-38 and the Tupelov-142 for long-range reconnaissance at sea.

The P-8I will provide real-time information and can be deployed in locations such as the Indian Naval Air Station, INS Baaz also known as "the Hawk." The P-8I will provide constant updates on the Strait of Malacca and also the "six degree channel" – the main shipping channel between the Indian and Pacific oceans.

The Strait is an important link between European markets and oil in the Gulf on one side, and China, Japan and Korea on the other side. Nearly 70,000 vessels pass through the Strait annually – about 40 percent of all global trade. :coffee:

In conjunction with the Indian Space Research Organization, the Navy is slated to launch a communications satellite that will provide communications among all its warships, helicopters, aircraft and submarines.

INDIA'S NEW NAVY CHIEF PILOTS 'BLUE-WATER' STRATEGY - Asia Pacific Defense Forum in English

//apdforum.com/en_GB/article/rmiap/articles/online/features/2012/09/27/india-navy-chief
 

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The fastest cruise missile in the world launching underwater

This is the first underwater launch of the BrahMos, the world's fastest cruise missile in operation capable of flying at Mach 3.0. I just like to see it pausing and changing direction in mid-air, like a scene from Robotech. The BrahMos is one of the reasons why aircraft carriers are obsolete.

//sploid.gizmodo.com/i-just-cant-have-enough-of-this-awesome-underwater-miss-1610395166

=> India successfully tests BrahMos supersonic cruise missile

India on Tuesday successfully test-fired the BrahMos supersonic cruise missile from a defence base in Odisha, an official said. It has a range of 290 km and can carry a conventional warhead of up to 300 kg.

The missile was launched from the Integrated Test Range in Chandipur in Balasore district, about 230 km from here.

"The test was successful. It was a land version of BrahMos. It was done with a total indigenous airframe," M.V.K.V. Prasad, director of the test range, told IANS.

The missile, developed by the Indo-Russian joint venture BrahMos Aerospace, has a top speed of Mach 2.8, which is about three times faster than the US subsonic Tomahawk cruise missile. This makes BrahMos one of the fastest cruise missiles in the world.

The missile can be launched from submarines, ships and aircraft. Sea and ground launched versions of the missile have been successfully tested and put into service with the army and the navy.

For more news from India Today, follow us on Twitter @indiatoday and on Facebook at facebook.com/IndiaToday

//indiatoday.intoday.in/story/india-successfully-tests-brahmos/1/370311.html
 
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@santosh10, the Modi government is approaching each issue in a positive frame of mind. This is necessary as we live in a democracy where we have to bring people on-board. Our political system is different from China or Pakistan even.

India wants to focus on development and security at the same time while giving preference to development.

Mr Modi believes that fast developmnent of India is best recipe for increasing security of the State.

I think we cannot containerize India. It is not possible to seal India from neighboring States. If Bangladesh is in problem, that problem will spill over into India. It is necessary for India to have influence in Bangladesh, as well aid Bangladesh in its development.

India has to play big role in South Asia. There is no option.

We have to view China's developmental assistance positively (though there may be negative security aspects), as economic development of the region is net positive for India.

We cannot be obsessed with only security issues. This kind of policy simply does not work.

Falling on the Process of "Pigs Hunt", a Mandatory Option

Even if credibility of these analysis are always on question, we do know it as the mostly known source of military strength comparison :ranger:
globalfirepower.com/countries-listing.asp
here we find Pakistan better ranked at 15th, while the Saudi Arabia just looks like a Pig among all. and as i said before, once we fall on the Religious divide in Asia, which may escalate further to Europe too, hopefully not. but if it ever happens, Saudis may take words/the promise, "even your God won't help survive from a Certain Pig Hunt, once you fall on the process, ongoing....."
.
 
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Ray

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world military strength, a comparison is OK for statistical status.

It, in no way, is indicative of the capability to engage in combat.

The variables are different.
 
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santosh10

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India to spend Rs 2 lakh crore over 10 years to boost its air combat power

NEW DELHI: India will spend over Rs 2 lakh crore (upwards of $35 billion) over the next 10 years to boost its air combat power to counter any threats to its territorial integrity as well as protect its expanding geopolitical interests.

While IAF's acquisition programmes have been well-documented — ranging from 126 medium multi-role combat aircraft (MMRCA) to over 200 futuristic 5th generation stealth fighters — the deputy chief of air staff Air Marshal R K Sharma put a figure to it on Thursday.

Speaking at a seminar on "Energizing the Aerospace Industry in India" here, Air Marshal Sharma said IAF plans to spend Rs 2 lakh crore on capital procurements during the 12th (2012-2017) and 13th (2017-2022) Plans while underlining the "huge potential" for the private sector to work in the defence sector.

Incidentally, this comes after Navy's ongoing warship, submarine and maritime aircraft acquisition programmes as well as proposed projects over the next 15 years were pegged at over Rs 3 lakh crore, as was first reported by TOI earlier.

The IAF figure may also sound "staggering" to some, but it's "a question of simple mathematics". With the norm being a 12%-15% hike in IAF's capital outlay every year, it already stands at Rs 30,514 crore for this fiscal.

Taking annual budgets over the two five-year Plan periods into account, and subtracting the amounts for capital works, the Rs 2 lakh crore figure seems conservative. "Moreover, it's for not just new acquisitions but also committed liabilities or installments for deals already inked," said a senior officer.

With both China and Pakistan bolstering their air forces, IAF certainly needs well-planned systematic inductions of fighters and helicopters, mid-air refuellers and transport planes, spy and combat drones, surface-to-air missiles and advanced radars.

Despite airpower being critical in winning modern wars, IAF is down to just 33-34 fighter squadrons (each has 12 to 18 jets) due to progressive phasing out of virtually obsolete MiGs. It will not be able to achieve its "sanctioned strength" of 39.5 squadrons even by 2017 despite needing at least 44 squadrons for "robust dissuasive deterrence" against China and Pakistan.

IAF is heavily banking upon the almost $20 billion MMRCA project to acquire 126 French Rafale fighters to plug gaps, apart from the ongoing phased induction of 270 Sukhoi-30MKIs contracted from Russia for around $12 billion.

With final commercial negotiations underway, the MMRCA contract is likely to be inked by mid-2013. The first 18 jets will come in "fly-away condition" from France from 2016 onwards, while the rest 108 will subsequently be manufactured under licence by Hindustan Aeronautics Limited over six years.

For the long-term, IAF is looking to induct over 200 of the 5th Gen swing-role fighters from 2022 onwards. India and Russia will ink the $11 billion full design R&D contract for them within six months, with each chipping in with $5.5 billion. India will eventually spend around $35 billion on this futuristic fighter project over the next 15-20 years, with each jet to be subsequently produced costing over $100 million.

India to spend Rs 2 lakh crore over 10 years to boost its air combat power - The Economic Times

//economictimes.indiatimes.com/news/politics/nation/india-to-spend-rs-2-lakh-crore-over-10-years-to-boost-its-air-combat-power/articleshow/16486099.cms
 

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world military strength, a comparison is OK for statistical status.

It, in no way, is indicative of the capability to engage in combat.

The variables are different.
there are too many analysis in this regard we find :ranger:

//world-defece-review.blogspot.in/2013/01/top-10-largest-air-forces-2013.html
youtube.com/watch?v=4wP_exsVNC8
//top10stand.blogspot.in/2014/02/top-10-worlds-strongest-air-forces-in.html
 
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sgarg

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How is India's para-military figure of 2,288,407 is arrived?? This figure should be close to 1 million.
 

santosh10

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How is India's para-military figure of 2,288,407 is arrived?? This figure should be close to 1 million.
on my side, its still not compared to Vietnam :ranger:

while concerning the global issues, we may have to cross the Total numbers of post#5, at well over 10million+ within 4-5 years, as likely :thumb:
 
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even if these analysis doesn't speak the ground reality, but we have something in this regard as below :ranger:
It seems that military age manpower for india should be above china? Considering indian
Demographics are a much younger population?
 

sgarg

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"Military Age Manpower" does not make a fighting force. The youngsters needs at least one year military training. There is a crying need to increase size of NCC and territorial army.
 
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"Military Age Manpower" does not make a fighting force. The youngsters needs at least one year military training. There is a crying need to increase size of NCC and territorial army.
If need ever arose this training can be offered in last year of school.
 

santosh10

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How is India's para-military figure of 2,288,407 is arrived?? This figure should be close to 1 million.

Wiping Out the First Axis of Evil

i just noticed, if we ever escalate our war on religion, and once Saudis comes on the direct target of "Pigs Hunt", to eliminate the origin/center of this Sunni Islamic religious activities, to check/prevent their funds they use to promote Sunni Fanaticism in different parts of world. we must first try to wipe out UAE too, at the same time. and here we see Dubai/UAE well within the rage of even Agni-1. just imagine that we have a war right now and we have wiped out Dubai by the next few hours as a start....... :ranger:
distancefromto.net/
im highly impressed with our one of the closest ally, Burma, for the way they tackled Bangladeshi Muslims on their ground recently, the highest foreign aid recipient of India itself. and the UAE, which was one of the 3 Diplomatic allies of Taliban till 2001 along with Saudis and Pakistan, and wiping out this one of the axis of evil may help Saudis get a warning on Pigs Hunt, while Riyadh itself fall at the distance of well with 2,500 km, Agni-2 :thumb:

:india:
 
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