Ukraine's Poroshenko to teach NATO how to wage war against Russia!!!

bhramos

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Ukrainian President Petro Poroshenko offered NATO to use the experience that "Ukraine obtained in showing resistance to Russian troops."

In his article for The Wall Street Journal, Poroshenko stated that no member of the alliance has the experience of warfare against modern Russian army. According to him, Ukraine has such an experience, although he does not specify where exactly the Ukrainian "victorious" army came across the Russian army.

Having started his article with the words praising NATO, Poroshenko wrote that the alliance was set up to "defend peace and world order" after the chaos of WWII. Therefore, according to the Ukrainian leader, it will be highly important to recollect those goals on Friday, when world leaders gather for the summit in Warsaw. Russia purposefully aggravates instability where possible in a hope to split the West and achieve her geopolitical objectives, he continued.

"NATO's collective security could likewise benefit from Ukraine's experience and intelligence. Russia's aggression on the eastern flank of NATO territory is an aggression not only against Ukraine, but the Western world. Yet no NATO member state has actual battlefield experience engaging with the modern Russian army. Ukraine does," Poroshenko wrote.

He stressed out that only close cooperation between Ukraine and NATO could contribute to stability in Ukraine, Eastern Europe, the Black Sea region and the Trans-Atlantic region as a whole.

"We are grateful for the support the West has given us so far. NATO has held firm in its stance against Russia's aggression in Crimea and Donbas, and continues to support the building of a strong army and a successful democratic state. Owing to the concerted economic pressure imposed through sanctions, Russia has been limited in its capacity to advance into Ukrainian territory," Poroshenko continued.

Poroshenko claims that "in Donbas, the Kremlin has turned to a war of attrition." Does the Ukrainian president know how many civilians the "glorious soldiers of the Ukrainian army" have killed?

"We will not settle for anything less than peace," Poroshenko also wrote at the time when Kiev, in violation of the Minsk agreements, continues to deliver heavy military equipment to the line of contact.

Poroshenko will have many meetings at the NATO summit. He was allowed to take part in the joint press conference with NATO Secretary General Jens Stoltenberg. One can only wait for more stunning revelations from the Ukrainian president. - See more at: http://www.pravdareport.com/news/wo...ato_russia_poroshenko-0/#sthash.AmLHSwS7.dpuf
 

Mikesingh

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Really? This after Ukraine got a whacking from Russia? Is he going to teach NATO how to get screwed? :pound:
 

Akim

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I tried to write the English equivalent of the Russian proverb:"За одного битого двух не битых дают". Perhaps badly. However it is a big revaluation of the Russian threat. Yesterday, the newspaper "the Times"published the article: "Russia using Ukraine battlefield to rehearse for war with the West", http://www.theaustralian.com.au/new...t/news-story/386950cdf922cedb2824e98dc2751296
where the spirit of the Soviet time (pardon the tautology) is the story of a powerful Russian army. Written completely unprofessional, but it can scare those who have not encountered it.
Russia is using the conflict in Ukraine to test new methods of waging war against the West, the British Army believes.

Russian forces are enhancing skills that combine tanks, artillery and other heavy weapons with a sophisticated deployment of electronic warfare to jam enemy radio signals and render equipment such as drones redundant, according to an internal army analysis.

President Putin’s understanding of propaganda has also been turned into a weapon to influence the will of populations through social media, radio stations and mass text messaging without the need to fire a single shot.

The document, produced by the army’s warfare branch, sets out for the first time how Britain must be better prepared to fight a future war where everything is a weapon, from lethal munitions and drones to Twitter and Facebook posts.

The experience of pro-western Ukrainian forces battling undeclared Russian military units and pro-Russian separatists in eastern Ukraine for the past two and a half years is used to drive home the complex and multi-layered face of a new era of Russian warfare.

Ambiguity is key, with “little green men” dispatched behind enemy lines to conduct sabotage missions, attack infrastructure, intimidate police and conduct political assassinations and kidnappings to create disorder, the analysis said.

“Low-intensity conflict can rapidly escalate to high-intensity warfare,” according to the document, entitled, Insights to ‘training smarter’ against a hybrid adversary. Russia focuses a huge amount of energy on controlling information in eastern Ukraine to manipulate public opinion with little challenge. “A strong narrative is maintained across open source media and use of social media is carefully monitored,” the document said.

“Reports which do not comply with [Russia’s] domestic narrative are quickly removed ... Coverage of [Russian forces killed in action] have been controlled and removed from social media and often denied.”

Psychological and other variations of so-called influence operations are an integral part of all military action.

Russian-backed separatists in Ukraine move vehicles around multiple times the night before an attack on Ukrainian government troops to hide the true size of their force. This is followed before dawn by a barrage of text messages containing pro-Russia propaganda, dispatched 5 to 15 minutes before the offensive starts.

The texts are sent using a drone to every mobile phone in the targeted area, including those of Ukrainian soldiers. Social media is also used to try to persuade communities and troops to support the separatists.

Simultaneously, electronic jamming devices, some concealed in civilian vehicles, are used to jam the radio and other communications devices of the Ukrainian military units, making it hard for soldiers to relay messages. Any Ukrainian drones in the air can be hijacked. Then the artillery fire starts.

The British assessment revealed that Russia has superior artillery and other anti-armour weapons to penetrate tanks and lightly armoured vehicles.

Ukrainian forces have taken to riding on the outside of their trucks because the chances of surviving a rocket or mortar strike are greater than from the inside. The British analysis said that 80 per cent of Ukrainian casualties were from Russian artillery.

“Light infantry vehicles are disproportionately vulnerable to enemy direct and indirect fires,” the assessment said. “Mechanised infantry needs MBT [main battle tank] equivalent protection and mobility for the high-intensity battlefield.”

This observation calls into question the utility of a long-overdue $7 billion program to build almost 600 lightly armoured Scout fighting vehicles for the army. The tracked vehicles will only start to enter service next year.

A lack of investment in British antitank weapons would also be a challenge in a war against Russia. The analysis said that the army’s Javelin antitank grenade weapon is the only missile capable of defeating Russia’s reactive armour. “In the absence of Javelin, light infantry units are vulnerable to [being] overrun ... by armour,” it said.

A defence source who has read the document said that the world faced a “paradigm shift” in the way that war is waged. The shift is as fundamental as the moment when tanks replaced horses and the machinegun superseded the single-shot rifle. “It is warfare where anything is a weapon,” he said.

This includes the use of misinformation to undermine democratic debate; cyberattacks; economic policies to exert pressure; and the deployment of undeclared troops to create a trigger for more conventional military intervention — as happened in Crimea.

“These Russian guys have a wartime mentality and our politicians have a peacetime mentality,” the source said. “We have had a holiday from history for the past 70 years and we have a very steep learning curve.”
 

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