Pakistan, GE sign MoU to produce 54,000 megawatts by 2020

Neo

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Pakistan, GE sign MoU to produce 54,000 megawatts by 2020


ISLAMABAD: The government has signed a Memorandum of Understanding (MoU) with General Electric (GE) in the Prime Minister House to help promote the modernisation of Pakistan’s infrastructure and economy.

Saleem H. Mandviwala, Chairman Board of Investment and Nani Beccalli-Falco, President and Chief Executive Officer of GE International singed the MOU on behalf of the government of Pakistan and General Electric Company respectively.

The prime minister welcomed the initiatives of General Electric to support Pakistan’s national objective for development. He expressed the democratic government’s commitment of making Pakistan a trade, investment and financial hub.

“This is a landmark day that we have signed the MoU with one of the most renowned conglomerates of the USA, and this will certainly open another productive era of economic ties and people to people contacts,” the Prime Minister said.

The agreement focuses on the development of Pakistan’s energy resources to meet projected demand of 54,000 megawatts by the year 2020. “General Electric is helping build the energy, water, transportation and technology infrastructure of the new century,” says Nani Beccalli-Falco, President and Chief Executive Officer of GE International. “There are huge synergies between the products and services GE businesses provide in energy and infrastructure and the needs and goals of Pakistan to modernize its economy with cleaner, more efficient and better infrastructure technologies.” GE has similar agreements with a number of other governments, including Kazakhstan, Nigeria, Qatar and the province of Ontario, Canada.

The government of Pakistan aimed to meet projected energy demands using diverse sources and tactics. Possible solutions include renewable sources, such as, wind, solar, geothermal, biomass, coal, hydro and conventional thermal through gas and steam turbines, rehabilitation of existing power generation facilities, along with transfer of technology for manufacture and repair of turbines, developing more efficient and environmentally sound rail transport systems, developing water purification and reuse, wastewater treatment, and process system programs.

According to the MOU’s terms, GE would assist Pakistan in achieving its goals by engaging in Pakistan’s energy, transportation and water sectors and would work to identify potential sources of funding and explore potential investment opportunities in those sectors. Pakistan has committed to meeting with GE regularly to facilitate the goals of the MoU and provide support to the establishment and operation of the GE facilities in Pakistan, transparently and consistent with the laws and regulations of Pakistan. Pakistan would also facilitate the issuance of work permits and visas for the GE employees and contractors as needed in order to support the objectives of the signed MOU. staff report
 

Yusuf

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Good for pakistan. They need energy and now that a nuke deal is not coming their way, such deals are good.
 

ajtr

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Wind Power Plant on Sunday in Jhimpir near Thatta in sindh.I think its Pakistan's 1st wind power plant recently inaugurated in 2009

 

ajtr

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is there any plan to make solar power plant.i think baloachistan and thar desert will be nice location to locate it.
 

Neo

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Pakistan's hydro potential is estimated to be 245.000MW, exploiting it should be our main priority since a civil nuke deal is atleast a decade away. Plus we have worlds 5th largest coal reserves in Thar, good enough to solve energy crisis and even export the surplus.
All it takes is good governance and leadership, something we totally suck at.
 

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Neo we have been hearing about the coal reserves in Thar for some time now, but there has been no development since date that I know of.

Could you let me know the reason why this is still not tapped. Obviously Pakistan will need outside assistance for mining this block as it does not have the expertise. Also somewhere I had read that the ash content was very high.

Look forward to your reply.
 

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Neo, I think Pakistani government must concentrate on water management and make this macro-project the first priority. This will help in alleivating many of the woes of the people and bringing in peace.
 

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Pakistan's coal resources

MINERAL MAP


Location Map showing the Coal Fields and Coal Occurances


ENERGY RESOURCES MAP OF PAKISTAN











Coal plays an important role as a primary and an inexpensive source for power generation. In 2003, the USA produced 1,069 million short tons of coal and consumed during the same period 1,090 million short tons.

The electric power sector accounted for over 90 per cent of the US coal consumption. In 2003, the USA generated 3,691 billion kwh of electricity from electric power sector, out of which coal-fired plants accounted for 53 per cent of generation, nuclear 21, natural gas 15, hydroelectricity seven and oil three per cent.

In many other developed countries coal is being used as the primary source for power generation. In Pakistan, coal currently makes up merely one per cent of the electric power generation.

Coal is primarily classified into four major categories, or 'ranks': lignite, sub-bituminous, bituminous and anthracite. One of the most valuable content of coal is its carbon content which supplies most of its heating value.

However, various other factors as moisture content, ash content and sulphur are also important in determining the rank of a particular coal. Anthracite, is top ranked coal, with highest carbon content that ranges between 86-98 per cent and has a heat value of nearly 15,000 BTUs (British thermal units) per pound.

Bituminous and sub-bituminous 'ranks' of coal are inferior to anthracite. The bituminous variety is used primarily to generate electricity and to make coke for the steel industry.

The discovery of coal in Balochistan during the late 18th century led to its commercial utilization mainly by the North-Western Railways during the colonial regime. At present, our total coal reserves are estimated around 184.5 billion tonnes. which include the lately discovered deposits of low sulphur coal at Thar.

The local coal falls in the lignite and sub-bituminous categories. Coal from Lakhra and Sonda fields of Sindh has relatively higher moisture, sulphur and ash contents.

As opposed to this, Thar coal having an estimated reserves of 184.6 billion tonnes is much superior in quality due to low sulphur content and higher heating value. Well-developed coal-fields are located in Punjab, Balochistan and Sindh.

SINDH: The Sindh province has total coal resources of 184 billion tonnes. The quality of coal is mostly lignite-B to sub-bituminous A-C. Brief description of two major deposits is given as under:

THAR: A large coal-field, having a resource potential of about 175 billion tonnes, has been discovered at Thar in the eastern part of the province, about 400 km South East of Karachi.

The coal-field extends over 9,000 sq km area out of which 356 sq km area has been studied in detail by the Geological Survey of Pakistan proving nine billion tonnes coal in four blocks.

The main coal bed thickness ranges from 12 to 21 meters at an average depth of 170 meters, upper 50 meters being loose sand. The quality of coal has been determined on the basis of chemical analyses of more than 2,000 samples. The rank of the coal ranges from lignite-B to sub-bituminous-A.

LAKHRA: The Lakhra coal-field in Dadu District, lies 16 km to the west of Khanot railway station on the Kotri-Dadu section of the Pakistan Railways. It covers approximately an area of about 200 sq km. It is well connected with Karachi and Hyderabad through roads and railways. Mining in the area is done underground.

Three coal seams are established in the field but generally only the middle seam is known, as Lailian bed possesses the necessary persistence and thickness for consideration in large-scale mining. It shows a variation in thickness from 0.75 meter to 2.5 meters.

Average thickness is 1.5 meter. Coal from Lakhra has an apparent rank of lignite A to sub-bituminous C. The coal is dull black and contains amber resin flakes and about 30 per cent moisture. Although it can be extracted in large lumps, it dries to a moisture content of about 8 per cent when brought to surface.

It tends to crumble on longer exposure to atmosphere and is often susceptible to spontaneous combustion. Based essentially on the results of the initial exploratory work done by the GSP, more detailed exploration has been subsequently undertaken by PMDC, JICA, Wapda and the USAID.

The total reserves of the deposit have been estimated to be 1328 million tonnes with 244 million tonnes measured, 629 indicated and 455 tonnes inferred. Average annual production of coal from Lakhra is over one million tonnes. Most of this production is used in the WAPDA power plant at Khanote, Sindh and in brick kiln industry.

SONDA-JHERRUCK: Over one billion tonnes reserves of lignite quality coal have been assessed in Sonda- Jherruck coal-field. Owing to favourable location and developed infrastructure, two Chinese companies have expressed interest to conduct feasibility study for commissioning of 500 mw power generation units.

In case the feasibility study justifies commissioning of project, an investment of $500 million would be made by the Chinese consortium for establishment of coal fired power project of 500 mw. A quantity of two million tonnes coal annually would be mined to cater for the requirements of power generation units.

Balochistan: The coal seams in Balochistan are found in Ghazig formation of Eocene age. The quality of the coal is sub-bituminous A to high volatile B bituminous. The coal-fields mostly lie around Quetta in Balochistan however the following are significant:

SOR-RANGE; DEGARI; SINJIDI: Sor-Range-Degari coal-field lies 13 to 25 km south east of Quetta covering an area of about 50 sq km and is easily accessible through metalled road from Quetta.

The northern half of the field is known as Sor Range, Degari is situated at the southern end of the field. The thickness of the coal seam varies from 1.0 meter to 2.0 meters but in Sor-Range seam sections up to 5.0 meters have been encountered. The coal is of better quality with low ash and sulphur content. The quality of the coal is high sub-bituminous A to high volatile B bituminous.

CHAMALANG: These are the newly discovered coal-fields which need development. Preliminary work done by GSP in these areas has indicated that it has a good potential.

The quality of coal is also better as compared to the rest of Balochistan. The rank of the coal ranges from high volatile C bituminous to high Volatile A-bituminous with a total resource of 6 million tonne. Its heating value is +12000 BTU/lb.

PUNJAB: The Punjab's coal fields comprise the eastern, central and western Salt Range between Khushab, Dandot and Khewra while Makerwal coal-field lies in Trans-Indus Range (Sanghar Range). The rank of the coal is sub-bituminous A to high volatile bituminous.

SALT RANGE: The Salt Range coal-field covers an area of about 260 sq km, between Khushab, Dandot and Khewra. The entire coal producing area is well connected with roads and railways.

The top seam varies in thickness from 0.22 meter to 0.30 meter while the middle seam is up to 0.60 meter thick. The lower seam is up to one meter thick and is relatively of better quality.

It is being mined in Dandot, Choa-Saiden Shah and adjoining areas. The Punjab Mineral Development Corporation and several private companies are operating the mines in the area. Reserve of the deposit is 235 million tonnes.

MAKERWAL/GULLAKHEL: Makerwal/Gullakhel coal-field is situated in Sarghar Range (Trans-Indus Range). The coal-field extends from about 3.2 km west of Makerwal to about 13 km West of Kalabagh covering an area of about 75 sq km, in Mianwali district. The quality of Makerwal/Gullakhel coal is better than that of Salt Range coal and is preferred by the consumers. Total reserves of the deposit are 22 million tonnes.

Lignite, the indigenous coal mostly found in Pakistan is a comparatively young coal geologically speaking and has the lowest carbon content of just 25-35 per cent and also the lowest heat value of only 6,000-10,000 BTUs per pound.

However, lignite, which is called 'brown coal', can be used for electric power generation. Lignite found in Thar has comparatively lower sulphur content, makes it more suitable for power generation after the washing process and an appropriate plant design.

The local production of coal is estimated at 3.21 million tons out of which presently over 80 per cent is being utilized by bricks makers, while the rest are being consumed by the cement industry to blend it with the imported coal to reduce the production cost, and only one per cent by the coal-based power stations.

It is reported that around 85 per cent of the cement industry has shifted on low-priced coal from relatively more expensive natural gas and furnace oil. The conversion has small impact on the local coal production because cement units are using high rank imported coal as the indigenous coal is of low quality.

Indigenous coal is blended with imported coal in small proportion, which is necessary for smooth operation of the plant. During the 2002, the cement industry utilized one million tons of imported coal from South Africa, Austria and Indonesia. Imported coal cost Rs3150 to Rs3510 per ton while local coal cost Rs1300 to Rs2500 per ton.

Use of coal as fuel in sugar industry can save around 9 million tons bagasse, which can be utilized to produce medium density fibreboard, excellent replacement of furniture-making wood and consequently saving our fast depleting forests.

Coal is also an important raw material for the production of several chemicals. Refined coal tar can be used in the manufacture of a range of chemicals including pitch, creosote oil, naphthalene, phenol, pyridine, benzene, toluene, xylene, ethylene, propylene, polyesters, plastics, synthesis gas, acetic acid, acetic anhydride.

Numerous chemicals and fuels can be manufactured from the gasification of coal. In late 1950's, Pak-American Fertilizers, Iskandarabad, Daudkhel was based on gasification technology supplied by Lurgi to produce ammonia and ammonium sulfate fertiliser.

Sasol of South Africa has developed the processes for production of petrochemicals from coal, with high ash content by gasification. Coal under pressure and high temperature, in the presence of steam and oxygen is converted to raw gas.

Condensation and subsequent cooling of gas, yields co-products such as tar and oil. Nitrogenous compounds (Ammonia), sulfur and phenolic compound are also recovered. The purified synthesis gas after cooling is made available for conversion to synthetic fuels and or chemical production. Sasol acquired the technology from Lurgi (Germany).

South African coal reserves are largely bituminous with relatively high ash content (about 45%) and low sulfur content (1%). The advantage of SASOL process is that it can process low-grade coal and a number of high value chemicals are produced along with synthetic fuels. It is understood that Sasol or similar technology can be adopted for our coal reserves.

It's time to explore coal and develop coal-fired power plants to not only lessen dependence on imported fuel but also to cut the cost of power production for the benefit of the industries, trade and individual consumers.

The government should also consider the utilization of indigenous coal for coal gasification, to produce high value petrochemicals, for which suitable technologies are available in the world.
 
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ajtr

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Power Sector Situation in Pakistan

Pakistan has two integrated public sector power utilities, the Water and Power Development Authority (WAPDA) and the Karachi Electric Supply Corporation (KESC). WAPDA supplies power to the whole of Pakistan except the metropolitan city of Karachi, which is supplied by KESC. The system of WAPDA and KESC are interconnected through 220 kV double circuit transmission lines. The country has a total installed generating capacity of about 19522 MW. The installed capacities owned by various agencies operating in the country. These are:
Water & Power Development Authority
(WAPDA): 11327 MW
Karachi Electric Supply Corporation
(KESC): 1756 MW
Pakistan Atomic Energy Commission
(PAEC): 462 MW
Independent Power Producers
(IPPs): 5977 MW

WAPDA was established in 1958 and entrusted with a massive agenda, which included generation, transmission and distribution of power along with irrigation, drainage and flood control etc. It owns about 58% of the country’s total power generation capacity and serves about 88% of all the electricity customers in the country. It serves over 13 million customers.The privatization of WAPDA is underway. Its distribution network has been divided into eight electric supply companies, which are successors of former Area Electricity Boards (AEBs). The AEBs were departments within WAPDA to administer the supply and distribution, construction, expansion and operation of the distribution system. These AEBs have been re-structured in eight independent power companies, i.e. eight distribution companies (DISCOs). Side by side three generation companies (GENCOs) and a national transmission and dispatch company (NTDC) have been created. Presently these entities are incorporated under the management of Pakistan Electric Power Company (PEPCO). So far Kot Addu has been privatized. DISCO at Faisalabad (FESCO) are next on line for privatization. KESC was incorporated in 1913 and is responsible for the generation, transmission and distribution of electricity in Karachi and its adjoining
areas. It has nearly 1.5 million customers, predominantly urban consumers.In order to promote fair competition in the electricity industry and to protect the rights of consumers as well as producers and sellers of electricity,the Government of Pakistan has enacted act the Regulation of Generation, Transmission and Distribution of Electric Power regulation Act, 1997. Under this act the National Electric Power Regulatory Authority (NEPRA) performs three main regulatory functions i.e., licensing of generation, transmission and distribution of electric power, tariff determination and prescription of standards and rules for conduct of business.1.1 Generation Capacity Between 1984/85 and 2004/05, Pakistan’s total installed power generating capacity increased nearly fourfold, from 5229 MW to 19,522 MW,for details see Annex-1. Thermal power plants contributed 64% of that total, while hydroelectric power plants accounted for 33%, and Pakistan’s two nuclear power plants produced 3% of the total1.1.2 Power generation
The electricity market in Pakistan has been characterised in recent years by marked changes in the primary energy sources used for producing electricity. In the fiscal year 1990/91, hydropower still accounted for nearly 45% of all electricitygenerated in the country, but by 2001/2002 that share had dropped to only 26%. Simultaneously,the share of thermally generated electricity increased from 54% to 71%, for details please refer to Annex-2. Most of that increase is the result of capacity expansion since the early 1990s in response to power shortages and the resultant frequent power outages.Pakistan has little commercially exploitable oil of its own. Consequently, more than 55% of the country’s oil needs were met by imports in the fiscal year 2001/02. The imports were used for such purposes as firing thermal power plants.
 

ajtr

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43 ppt slides on pakistan nuke powre generation.

The Pakistan Nuclear Power Program- Security and Safety Issues

Pakistani Current Nuclear Power
Program
• Two Operating Nuclear Power Plants, One under
Construction
• KANUPP
125 MWe (Net) CANDU Type reactor, Near Karachi, commercial
operation 12/1972
• CHASNUPP-1
300 MWe (Net) PWR, Near Chasma in the Punjab, commercial operation
9/2000
• CHASNUPP -2
300 MWe (Net) PWR, Near Chasma, Under construction, commercial
operation expected ~2012
 

tarunraju

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Wind Power Plant on Sunday in Jhimpir near Thatta in sindh.I think its Pakistan's 1st wind power plant recently inaugurated in 2009

That picture isn't of Jhimpir windfarm, though.
 

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Islamabad Sees Deals With China

BEIJING -- China and Pakistan are discussing a variety of deals, including a possible investment by China Petrochemical Corp. in a major Pakistani coal reserve, a senior Pakistani government official said Tuesday.

The talks underscore how Pakistan is becoming another important investment destination for China in its hunger for oil and gas.

Sohail Ahmad, director of Pakistan's Board of Investment, said the two sides are also discussing an option to construct a rail and road link to help transport oil from the Middle East to western China.Mr. Ahmad said the two potential deals are part of broader bilateral trade and economic cooperation proposals under discussion between the two countries. Other areas for potential cooperation include the textile, heavy industry and water sectors, he said.

China Petrochemical Corp., also known as Sinopec Group, has launched the first phase of a feasibility study into the estimated 185 billion metric ton Thar coal reserve, located in southern Pakistan.

It is studying gasification of the coal reserves among other possibilities such as power generation and mining, Mr. Ahmad said. Gasification is a process to convert coal into gas and then into liquefied natural gas, or LNG, for producing chemical products.

Pakistan has vast coal reserves, mostly in the Thar Desert, but has barely exploited them due to a lack of investment.

Last year, the Pakistan government said the reserves were the fifth-largest coal reserves in the world. Pakistan produces less than 0.5% of its total power generation capacity from coal, it said.

China, meanwhile, is seeking raw resources to fuel its rapid development and to funnel resources into its less wealthy western region.

Mr. Ahmad also said the two governments are in talks to build a road and rail link from Pakistan's Gwadar Port, at the mouth of the Persian Gulf, to Xinjiang in western China. The port was jointly constructed by the two countries.

If the link is built, it might among other things help extend to Xinjiang the oil pipeline from Iran to Pakistan or the LNG route from Qatar to Pakistan, he said.

Discussions between senior government leaders of Pakistan and China on the link, which could cost billions of dollars, remain "at the very initial stage," he said.

Pakistan President Asif Ali Zardari, who visited China in August to talk about these and other projects, will visit Beijing again in December for further talks, Mr. Ahmad said.

Asked if Pakistan is worried about Chinese state-owned enterprises taking control of some of its important companies, he said, "We don't have any concern, and we don't feel China is a threat."

The two countries' leaders have decided to set up a China-specific economic zone in Pakistan, he said, featuring a tax exemption as well as some legal protections.

—Victoria Ruan and Wan Xu

Reference:Islamabad Sees Deals With China - WSJ.com
 

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Wind power projects may get 13.5 cents/kWh


Tuesday, March 02, 2010
By Saad Hasan

KARACHI: The government will likely have to offer a tariff of 13.5 US cents per kilowatt-hour and a 20-25 per cent rate of return on investment for wind power projects, industry people told the government here on Monday.

The proposed tariff is more than the previous upfront 9.5 cents offered to investors that had to be withdrawn late last year after it failed to generate any interest, a consultative meeting on Renewable Energy Policy discussed.

Representatives of the industry, experts and officials of the Alternate Energy Development Board (AEDB) have held series of negotiations to finalise a new medium term policy. The final policy draft is expected to be completed on March 8, 2010 for its presentation to Economic Coordination Committee of Cabinet for approval.

“A lot of wind turbine suppliers like Siemens and General Electric have set their eyes on our market,” Adnan Tapal, director of Green Power told The News. “These are the people we had to run after just two years back.”

Green Power is one of the twenty Pakistani companies which have been trying in vain to harness wind corridor in interior of Sindh to generate electricity. “As far as financing is concerned, IFC is onboard with us. We are hoping for a financial close by next October but a good indicative tariff is imperative.”

Multilateral lenders including World Bank and Asian Development Bank are part of many renewable energy projects. Yet, none have started production. However, it is expected that the new policy framework will help different companies to achieve financial close for as much as 200mw wind power projects in 2010, industry people say.

Rise in demand in other countries for alternate power sources, deteriorating political and security situation here and relatively low tariff are termed as main reasons behind failure of these project to materialize.

Despite passage of more than five years since first alternate energy policy came, only one Turkish company, Zorlu Energy, has set up windmills on commercial scale. It is running six turbines of 1mw each.

Mujahid Sadiq, DG International Cooperation at AEDB, says it is not unusual for a country new to concept of alternate energy generation to take time in preparing policy framework. “We don’t have a precedent unlike thermal power plants so there is always risk involved,” he said, adding investor’s interest will develop once few renewable energy projects are commissioned.

The power tariff for renewable energy projects automatically comes down after a certain period, normally 10 years, as the investors recover finance cost. Pakistan is facing a severe energy shortage, which has slowed down industrial output and caused angry riots in many cities. Circular debt, which runs into billions of rupees, has crippled government’s power sector entities.

Massive investment is needed in power infrastructure to check line losses and improve service to convince people to pay their bills. While public sector power distributors are running in losses, government has ensured fixed returns to independent power producers, which use expensive fuel oil.
 

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Proposed alternative and renewable energy projects

Sovereign Pakistani guarantees not enough; ADB extends ‘counter guarantees’ to potential investors

Thursday, March 04, 2010
By M. Waqar Bhatti

Karachi

The Asian Development Bank (ADB) has extended ‘counter guarantees’ to potential local and international investors interested in setting up alternative and renewable energy plants in Pakistan, after they hesitated in accepting the sovereign guaranty of the Pakistan government.

“Owing to the deteriorating credit worthiness of the government, investors were reluctant in investing in the alternative and renewable energy sector, but now, the ADB has agreed to provide counter guarantees to them,” Alternate Energy Development Board (AEDB) Chief Executive Officer Arif Allaudin told The News.

Allaudin said that potential investors interested in setting up alternate and renewable energy plants in the country had ‘serious doubts’ over the ability of National Transmission and Dispatch Company (NTDC) to purchase power, but this issue has now been resolved.

The ADB, in principle, has agreed to extend the counter guarantee against the sovereign guarantee of Pakistan, and it is now hoped that potential investors as well as financers will take renewed interest in establishing alternative and renewable power production units in the country, he maintained.

In addition to providing counter guarantees, the ADB has also agreed to provide technical assistance to provincial governments, while the AEDB would ensure preferred tariffs to investors interested in setting up wind, geothermal or any other alternate or renewable energy units, the AEDB CEO added.

Allaudin explained that the ADB would provide around US$ one million to the Sindh government for capacity building and project preparation in alternate or renewable sector, as currently, the provincial government lacks both trained human resource as well as any project in this sector.

Similarly, the United States Trade Development Authority (USTDA) would provide US$ 300,000 for carrying out a feasibility study on generating electricity from domestic waste produced in the city. “At this moment, around 10,000 to 11,000 tons of domestic waste is generated in Karachi, and it is estimated that if it is used for power generation, it has the potential of generating 250 to 300 megawatts electricity,” the AEDB chief said.

Allaudin maintained that the AEDB assured the provincial government that it would not only arrange finances once a project is prepared and vetted, but also offer other incentives, such as tax exemption and providing preferred tariffs to investors interested in the alternative and renewable energy sector.

“Actually, our future lies solely in investing and adopting alternative and renewable sources of energy; otherwise we don’t have the resources to produce electricity by using oil and gas in the days to come,” he claimed.

In another important development for Sindh, Allaudin said that his department had also decided to revive the Landhi Cattle Colony project, which will generate around 38 MW of electricity, but also produce 80 tons to fertilizer.

“For the last 15 years, this project was in disarray owing to the involvement of several parties, and each of them was claiming that they were given the authority by some agency to utilise animal waste for power production. Now we have intervened and resolved this issue with the help of provincial government,” he claimed.

Regarding the formulation of medium-term alternative and renewable energy policy, Allaudin said that provinces felt marginalised when a short-term policy was formulated earlier, but now, all provinces are on board in the preparation of the medium-term policy.

“Sindh now has equal participation in the preparation of the ARE policy as compared to Punjab, NWFP or the federal government, and we have assured them that the role of AEDB is just to facilitate and not to dictate,” he maintained.

When asked about the meeting of the Policy Review Committee (held yesterday), he said that the meeting was hosted by Sindh, and several important decisions were made and projects were approved during the meeting. All these decisions have been taken for the promotion of alternative and renewable energy sector in Sindh.
 

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PPIB issues LoS for 404MW power plant

Thursday, March 04, 2010
By our correspondent

ISLAMABAD: The Private Power and Infrastructure Board (PPIB) and Uch-II Power an affiliate of Uch Power Ltd (UPL) have signed a Letter of Support (LoS) for a 404MW power project based on indigenous low Btu gas from Uch gas field to be located near Dera Murad Jamali, District Nasirabad, Balochistan.

According to the press release issued here on Wednesday the project will bring foreign investment of around $500 million to the country resulting into socio-economic uplift of Balochistan and Pakistan.

The major shareholders of Uch-II Power Project are International Power of UK and Creative Energy Resources, UAE.

The Uch-II Power Project is based on indigenous low Btu gas and in view of the prevailing power shortages and increasing dependence on imported fuel oil, this Project is very important from national perspective.

The low Btu gas cannot be injected to national gas pipeline system and may only be used for power generation. As per the agreed timeline the Uch-II Power is required start commercial operation of project by 2013.
 

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