Nag anti-tank Missile

WolfPack86

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Final trial of Nag anti-tank guided missile successful, ready for induction in Indian Army
In a major boost for the indigenisation in defence sector, India today successfully carried out the final trial of the Nag anti-tank guided missile after which the weapon system is now ready for induction into the Indian Army.

"India today successfully carried out the final trial of the DRDO-developed Nag anti-tank guided missile with a warhead. The test was carried out at 6:45 am at the Pokhran field firing ranges in Rajasthan," Defence Research and Development Organisation officials told here.

The Missile system is now ready for induction into the Indian Army which has been looking for such a missile system to take down the enemy tanks and other armoured vehicles.


The Nag Missile system fired from a Nag Missile Carrier (NAMICA) can take our targets at ranges of 4 to 7 kilometres and is fitted with an advanced seeker to home on to its target.

The NAG missile is a third-generation anti-tank guided missile, which has top attack capabilities that can effectively engage and destroy all known enemy tanks during day and night.

The Army needs third-generation ATGMs with a strike range of over 2.5km with fire and forget capabilities. It needs them to equip its mechanised infantry units to carry them on their Russian BMP vehicles.

The army is currently using second-generation Milan 2T and Konkur ATGMs and has been looking for about third-generation missiles, which are important for stopping advancing enemy tanks.

The Defence Ministry in 2018 had cleared the acquisition of 300 Nag missiles and 25 NAMICAs for the Indian Army.
 

ClawReed787

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How much effective is nag and also in comparison with spike? Especially in terms of Armour penetration
 

WolfPack86

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India Successfully Tests NAG Anti-Tank Guided Missile With A Warhead In Final Trials, Ready For Induction In Army
NEW DELHI: At 6:45 am, India on Thursday (22-10-2020) successfully carried out the final trial of the Defence Research and Development Organisation-developed Nag anti-tank guided missile (ATGM) with a warhead after which the weapon system is now ready for induction into the Indian Army.


"India today successfully carried out the final trial of the DRDO-developed Nag anti-tank guided missile with a warhead. The test was carried out at 6:45 am at the Pokhran field firing ranges in Rajasthan," Defence Research and Development Organisation officials told ANI here.

The Missile system is now ready for induction into the Indian Army which has been looking for such a missile system to take down the enemy tanks and other armoured vehicles.

The latest ATGM is another feather in DRDO's list of indigenous warheads. Over the past one and a half month, DRDO has conducted at least 12 missile and system tests that cater to a range of combat requirements.

The Nag Missile system fired from a Nag Missile Carrier (NAMICA) can take our targets at ranges of 4 to 7 kilometres and is fitted with an advanced seeker to home on to its target.

The NAG missile is a third-generation anti-tank guided missile, which has top attack capabilities that can effectively engage and destroy all known enemy tanks during day and night.

The Army needs third-generation ATGMs with a strike range of over 2.5km with fire and forget capabilities. It needs them to equip its mechanised infantry units to carry them on their Russian BMP vehicles.

The army is currently using second-generation Milan-2T and Konkur ATGMs and has been looking for about third-generation missiles, which are important for stopping advancing enemy tanks.

The Defence Ministry in 2018 had cleared the acquisition of 300 Nag missiles and 25 NAMICAs for the Indian Army.
 

ArgonPrime

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How much effective is nag and also in comparison with spike? Especially in terms of Armour penetration
It should be comparable. In any case, top attack missiles like Nag doesn't really need such a high level of DOP (depth of penetration) as direct attack ATGMs like Kornet E for example as the roof of the MBTs are very thinly armored with thickness almost never exceeding 4 cm of RHA ( could be even less).
 

Bleh

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This NAMICA vehicle is way to Vulnerable. I hope they do not induct it in large number. NAG need to replace konkurs ATGM on BMP 2 asap.
Sharing what I was pointed out elsewhere... They're ordering only 25 of the Namica platforms. It'll not be exposed like BMP-2.
They'll keep it 5-7km behind the lines to snipe targets.

BMP-2 & later FICV will get the smaller MPATGM mounted on them.
 

Defcon 1

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So basically when DRDO claimed last year that nag had completed all trials and was ready to be inducted, they were lying?

Another good one from drdo
 

utubekhiladi

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@Bleh @patriots @Karthi @porky_kicker

we have seen NAG missile launch, we have seen Missile Travel all the way to the target, we have seen missile hit the tank and we see explosion.

and that's it...

have we ever seen a video or pic of the tank after the missile hit? like of how much damage has occurred to the tank after the missile hit?
 
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porky_kicker

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@Bleh @patriots @Karthi @porky_kicker

we have seen NAG missile launch, we have seen Missile Travel all the way to the target, we have seen missile hit the tank and we see explosion.

and that's it...

have we ever seen a video or pic of the tank after the missile hit? like of how much damage has occurred to the tank after the missile hit?
I have not seen, why does it matter , IA looks for the smallest excuse to reject DRDO products , if penetration is not as claimed , army would have objected on this issue long time back. Plus warhead is tested seperately by DRDO and certified for the penetration range. It defeated triple NATO targets.

Nag has a 8 kg shape charged warhead with penetration of greater thn 900 mm of RHA protected by ERA.
 
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utubekhiladi

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I have not seen, why does it matter , IA looks for the smallest excuse to reject DRDO products , if penetration is not as claimed , army would have objected on this issue long time back
well, that's a satisfactory and most convincing answer :)
thanks sir ji 🙏
 

patriots

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This article says
""The missile hit the target accurately defeating the armour""
Means target destroyed
 

WolfPack86

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Anti-tank missile with 10km range to be tested in 2 months

India is developing a new air-launched missile capable of knocking out enemy tanks from a stand-off distance of more than 10km, and a crucial test of the weapon will be conducted in two months at a time when the country is locked in border tensions with China in the Ladakh theatre, top officials familiar with the developments said on Wednesday.

The indigenous missile -- named stand-off anti-tank missile (Sant) -- is expected to be mated to the Indian Air Force’s Russian-origin Mi-35 attack helicopters to arm them with the capability to destroy enemy armour from an improved stand-off range, one of the officials cited above said, asking not to be named.

The existing Russian-origin Shturm missile on the Mi-35 can target tanks at a range of 5km. The other weapons on the gunship include rockets of different calibre, 500kg bombs, 12.7mm guns, and a 23mm cannon.


Sant -- being developed by the Defence Research and Development Organisation (DRDO) -- will be launched from a Mi-35 helicopter gunship for the first time in December, in what is being seen as a developmental milestone.

“Preparations are being made for the maiden test-firing of the missile from a Mi-35 gunship. A series of air-launched tests will follow next year after which the missile will be ready for induction,” said a second official on condition of anonymity, adding that the missile will have lock-on after launch and lock-on before launch capability. A lock-on means the target has been detected and the missile will hit it irrespective of any change in the target’s position.

The plan is to test the new missile from the attack helicopter eight to 10 times before it is declared operational by the end of 2021, the second official said.

“An improved stand-off capability -- from 5km to 10km -- to target tanks will be a good capability enhancement for the Mi-35. If the helicopter can engage enemy armour from a distance of 10km, it is unlikely to take a hit from ground fire,” said former IAF chief Air Chief Marshal Fali H Major (retd).

The existing anti-tank missiles developed by DRDO -- the Nag and Helina -- have an effective range of under 5km. While the Nag missile is launched from a modified infantry combat vehicle (called the Nag missile carrier or Namica) and has a range of 4km, the Helina or helicopter-based Nag is for mounting on the Dhruv advanced light helicopter and can strike targets up to 5km away.

The Sant missile was successfully tested from a ground launcher on Monday off the coast of Odisha -- the 13th test-firing of a missile by India in less than two months in the midst of the border stand-off with China and deadlocked talks to reduce tensions along the contested Line of Actual Control (LAC). Neither the defence ministry nor DRDO made any public announcement on the October 19 test.

The key tests recently conducted by India include the supersonic missile-assisted release of torpedo (SMART) to target submarines at long ranges, a new version of the nuclear-capable hypersonic Shaurya missile with a range of 750km and the anti-radiation missile launch to take down enemy radars and surveillance systems.

India is also developing a new class of ultra-modern weapons that can travel six times faster than the speed of sound (Mach 6) and penetrate any missile defence. In early September, DRDO carried out a successful flight test of the hypersonic technology demonstrator vehicle (HSTDV) for the first time from a launch facility off the Odisha coast.

Only the United States, Russia and China have developed technologies to field fast-manoeuvring hypersonic missiles that fly at lower altitudes and are extremely hard to track and intercept.

India could develop hypersonic cruise missiles powered by air-breathing scramjet engines in about four years. Mach 6 translates into a speed of 7,408 kmph.

 

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