Modernisation of Indian Army Infantry

Blue Water Navy

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Our army is too huge for single weapon system.
Besides mass weapon has to be affordable.
If we give option to sig or caracal, I am sure they can figure something out. After all the total amount of guns will around 22 lakhs.
 

Bhadra

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Army to procure multipurpose survival kits for infantry troops
https://economictimes.indiatimes.com/news/defence/army-to-procure-multipurpose-survival-kits-for-infantry-troops/articleshow/76696468.cms?utm_source=contentofinterest&utm_medium=text&utm_campaign=cppst

NEW DELHI: The Indian Army will procure multipurpose survival kits for foot soldiers as part of its infantry modernisation plan, said Army sources on Monday. The sources stated that the Army will be floating an open tender to procure these kits in which foreign vendors will also be able to bid.

Each such kit should consist of components such as drop point blade, wire cutter, electric wire stripper, flat blade screwdriver and can opener, the sources noted.

The Indian Army has drawn a mega plan for infantry modernisation under which various equipment are being procured.
************

One example of Survival Kit :

Survival Kit.jpg
 

Killswitch

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Any word on a make in India deal for the SIG 716? This is supposed to be the rifle for frontline troops, and India requires way more than 70K. I'm guessing all other troops will get AK 203s. I haven't heard anything about the Caracal, maybe more 203s will be made to fill that requirement.
 

Tridev123

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Any word on a make in India deal for the SIG 716? This is supposed to be the rifle for frontline troops, and India requires way more than 70K. I'm guessing all other troops will get AK 203s. I haven't heard anything about the Caracal, maybe more 203s will be made to fill that requirement.
Is there a plan to manufacture Sig716 in India either in the private sector or OFB?. Any latest news on this?. The 7.62 * 51 calibre bullet is a powerful round, no doubt but is it meant for the China border for mountain warfare or will it be issued to troops on the Pakistan border also. What is the exact role envisaged for the 7.62 * 51 rifles. Counter insurgency role is ruled out for the 7.62 * 51 rifle, I guess?.

Is the 5.56 * 45 round going to be the new Carbine round or is the 7.62 * 39 round going to fulfil that role. There is talk of the Ak-203 being used in the Carbine role.
What is the strength of the recoil of the 7.62 * 39 rifle vis- a- vi's the 5.56 * 45 rifle.
Can the 7.62 * 39 rifle replace the 5.56 * 45 rifle in the Carbine role.
What is the thinking of the Army on these issues?.
 

WolfPack86

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World's 1st bulletproof helmet against AK-47 bullets developed by Indian Army Major
Lucknow: An Indian Army Major who had developed a bulletproof jacket for protection against sniper bullets, has now developed a helmet which is claimed to be first such in the world that can stop an AK-47 bullet round from a distance of 10 meters.


"The ballistic helmet has been developed under project Abhedya by Major Anoop Mishra who has also developed a full-body protection bulletproof jacket which can withstand even sniper rifles," Army officials told news agency ANI.






The officer is part of the Indian Army's College of Military Engineering and had got into the development of bulletproof jackets after he had received gunshots on his vintage bulletproof jacket.


Along with this, Indian Army's College of Military Engineering jointly with a private firm has developed India's first and world's cheapest gunshot locator. It can locate the exact location of the bullet from distance of 400 meters which will help to locate and neutralise terrorists faster.

During 2016-17, 50,000 bulletproof jackets had been procured for Indian Army through Revenue route. The Contract for procurement of 1,86,138 BPJs through Capital route, under Buy (Indian) category, has been concluded in April 2018. Further, a contract for procurement of 1,58,279 Ballistic Helmet through Capital route had been concluded in December 2016," the then Minister of State for Defence, Subhash Bhamre had informed Lok Sabha in a written reply in July 2018.


The College of Military Engineering (CME) at Pune, a premier tactical & Technical training institution is the alma mater of the Corps of Engineers.


CME is responsible for training of personnel of the Corps of Engineers besides imparting instructions in Combat Engineering, CBRN Protection, Works Services and GIS matters to the personnel of All Arms & Services.
 

Gessler

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The army’s new helmet will also have to support various accessories like night-vision goggles, a torch, visors and face shields. More importantly, it has asked for the new helmet to protect against the AK-47’s 7.62x39 mm Mild Steel Core and Hard Steel Core bullets from 10 metres. Mild steel core bullets are most commonly used, while hard steel core rounds are those designed to penetrate metal and body armour.

In two firefights in the Kashmir Valley, one in Pulwama in 2017 and another at Lethpora in 2018, militants had used armour-piercing AK-47 bullets. On June 20 this year, BSF jawans in Kathua shot down a Pakistani hexacopter carrying a US-built M4A1 Colt carbine and two magazines with 60 M855A1 Enhanced Performance Rounds (EPR). These are regular 5.56x45 mm NATO rounds with a steel penetrator tip that can easily penetrate the Level III body armour worn by Indian security forces.

When the army was inducted to fight the insurgency in Jammu and Kashmir in the early 1990s, its soldiers were equipped with the Model 1974 fibreglass helmets, which offered inadequate protection against bullets and splinters. An improvised low-cost solution, the ‘bulletproof patka’ helmet was designed by Major General V.K. Datta in the early 1990s, and is still the standard issue in counterinsurgency operations. It is a circular sheet of armoured steel wrapped in canvas. While it protected the soldier from the bullet itself, it was less successful in protecting the wearer from the trauma of the bullet’s impact. Additionally, bullets ricocheting from the helmet could also injure soldiers standing near the wearer.

In 2018, the army placed a Rs 170-crore order for 158,000 helmets from Kanpur-based firm MKU. The helmets were, however, found to offer inadequate protection against the AK-47 bullets commonly used by militants. A stop-gap AK-47 protector—a modular ceramic add-on plate produced and designed by another manufacturer—was then issued to troops.

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The add-on armour plates mentioned in article were these -

ED8szNCUYAElu6I.jpg
EEUjgNOU4AAAI7N.jpg


Finally it seems IA has seriously come into the routine of utilizing modern technologies, gathering data & feedback from real-world use, then quickly using the lessons learnt to further develop the requirements and procure even better equipment. This was a process that should have ideally started 20 years ago, but while the country itself only started to come out of inward-looking License raj in 1991, the Govt-run companies or organizations like the Army took even longer.

The new requirement seems to ask for helmet systems like these -





Can't wait to see MKU, TAML etc. come up with solutions geared for these requirements. Only these Pvt companies can hope to keep up with the fast-paced ever-changing nature of technology & warfare. The days of relying on Sarkari-run factories and random bouts of individual ingenuity are hopefully behind us.
 

Knowitall

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The army’s new helmet will also have to support various accessories like night-vision goggles, a torch, visors and face shields. More importantly, it has asked for the new helmet to protect against the AK-47’s 7.62x39 mm Mild Steel Core and Hard Steel Core bullets from 10 metres. Mild steel core bullets are most commonly used, while hard steel core rounds are those designed to penetrate metal and body armour.

In two firefights in the Kashmir Valley, one in Pulwama in 2017 and another at Lethpora in 2018, militants had used armour-piercing AK-47 bullets. On June 20 this year, BSF jawans in Kathua shot down a Pakistani hexacopter carrying a US-built M4A1 Colt carbine and two magazines with 60 M855A1 Enhanced Performance Rounds (EPR). These are regular 5.56x45 mm NATO rounds with a steel penetrator tip that can easily penetrate the Level III body armour worn by Indian security forces.

When the army was inducted to fight the insurgency in Jammu and Kashmir in the early 1990s, its soldiers were equipped with the Model 1974 fibreglass helmets, which offered inadequate protection against bullets and splinters. An improvised low-cost solution, the ‘bulletproof patka’ helmet was designed by Major General V.K. Datta in the early 1990s, and is still the standard issue in counterinsurgency operations. It is a circular sheet of armoured steel wrapped in canvas. While it protected the soldier from the bullet itself, it was less successful in protecting the wearer from the trauma of the bullet’s impact. Additionally, bullets ricocheting from the helmet could also injure soldiers standing near the wearer.

In 2018, the army placed a Rs 170-crore order for 158,000 helmets from Kanpur-based firm MKU. The helmets were, however, found to offer inadequate protection against the AK-47 bullets commonly used by militants. A stop-gap AK-47 protector—a modular ceramic add-on plate produced and designed by another manufacturer—was then issued to troops.

++++

The add-on armour plates mentioned in article were these -

View attachment 53060View attachment 53061

Finally it seems IA has seriously come into the routine of utilizing modern technologies, gathering data & feedback from real-world use, then quickly using the lessons learnt to further develop the requirements and procure even better equipment. This was a process that should have ideally started 20 years ago, but while the country itself only started to come out of inward-looking License raj in 1991, the Govt-run companies or organizations like the Army took even longer.

The new requirement seems to ask for helmet systems like these -





Can't wait to see MKU, TAML etc. come up with solutions geared for these requirements. Only these Pvt companies can hope to keep up with the fast-paced ever-changing nature of technology & warfare. The days of relying on Sarkari-run factories and random bouts of individual ingenuity are hopefully behind us.

Can someone find out which helmets are we getting.
 

WolfPack86

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Israel’s ‘Maoz’ Loitering Munition Next For Indian Infantry?

With plenty of Israeli armament already in service with the Indian armed forces, word just in on the next piece of kit in the pipeline. Called ‘Maoz’ in Israeli Defence Force service, the SPIKE FIREFLY loitering munition will likely soon be contracted by the Indian government as part of special financial powers in the current atmosphere of tension with China and Pakistan.


The Firefly is basically a helicopter ‘suicide drone’ with two coaxial rotors, carrying a sensor payload and a warhead. Controlled from tablet-based console, the fully human-portable system can be quickly deployed in close infantry combat situations where visibility stands compromised. While the IDF procured the Firefly most recently in May for urban warfare profiles, the Indian Army is looking to obtain the capability for regular infantry in border areas as well as counter-insurgency units. The Firefly has a stated operating range of 500 meters in an urban setting and a kilometer in the open.


While imports have only ever needed token justification despite a declared emphasis self-reliance and ‘Make in India’, loitering munitions likely get a free pass anyway since the DRDO and Indian private sector aren’t (yet) known to be developing systems of this kind. Whether numbers would compel local assembly remains to be seen, though that could easily be supported by the partnerships Israeli firms have in India, including the Firefly’s maker Rafael with India’s Kalyani Defence.


According to official Rafael literature, the Firefly ‘eliminates the value of cover and with it, the necessity of long-drawn firefights; it will make obsolete the old infantry tactic firing and maneouvering to eliminate an enemy hiding behind cover‘.

If contracted, the Firefly would be the third Israeli loitering munition in Indian service after the IAI Harpy and Harop. The Indian Air Force began acquiring Harop kamikaze drones in 2009, with a top-up cleared by the Indian MoD last year. Current tensions with China, and the PLA’s deployment of air defence elements near the Line of Actual Control (LAC) has compelled the Indian forces to speed up procurement of more Harops.


The Firefly would also effectively be the Indian Army’s first loitering weapon. A decade ago in 2010, the Army briefly scouted the world market for medium-range loitering munition, with MBDA’s Fire Shadow being considered. That contest was abandoned before it even took off.


To be sure, Israel has hawked its lengthy catalogue of loitering munitions to India for years, including the Rotem-L seen above in a picture from AeroIndia 2017, the Hero-30 and the Elbit SkyStriker. The latter three could also be procured in small numbers if the Israeli push translates into sales.


Interest in the Firefly is part of a flurry of Indian armament deals Israel is likely to land at this time. The Indian Air Force will soon contract for more Spice 2000 precision guided munitions, while there’s been buzz over more air defence systems coming India’s way specifically for the Ladakh theatre.
 

WolfPack86

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All You Should Know About SPIKE FIREFLY, The Loitering Munition That Indian Army May Buy From Israel
India is planning to procure Israel-based Rafael’s SPIKE FIREFLY weapon system, a lightweight loitering munition, a report in the Hindustan Times says.



The Indian Army is likely to procure this weapon system, among others, using the special economic powers granted to the Armed Forces.



Known in the Israeli Defence Forces as ‘Maoz’, FIREFLY has been designed for use by infantry and special forces. It comes in a canister-deployed design and has multiple rotors which enables it to hover over structures.



Weighing just 3 kg, FIREFLY has a compact and rugged airframe, and its twin-rotor blades retract and fold along the body when not in use, forming a damage resistant package which fits into a canister and can be easily carried by troops in battlefield.



It has been described as a light, small, and agile unmanned system for tactical use, and can be deployed within seconds in the battlefield.



Controlled from a tablet-based console, this weapon system allows infantry units to target structures such as buildings and camps, with precision.



And it can return to the operator with a click of a button if it remains unused at the end of the operation.



Given that it comes with a bidirectional data link, which allows two-way data transmission and electro optical seekers, FIREFLY can be used for target — both moving and stationary — with or without line-of-sight to operator.



It can be used both at day and night, has a stand-off range of 500 metres in urban areas and 1,000 meters in open areas, and can withstand wind speeds of up to 10 metres per second, allowing it to remain stable in windy environments.



This weapon system can be used to target enemies that may be beyond line of sight or hiding in urban areas, an environment that Indian Army units engaged in counter-insurgency operations in the Kashmir Valley often face.



“FIREFLY will essentially eliminate the value of cover and with it, the necessity of long-drawn-out firefights. It will also make obsolete the old infantry tactic of firing and manoeuvring to eliminate an enemy hiding behind cover,” Rafael’s literature on FIREFLY, available on its website, reads.
 

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