J20 Stealth Fighter

Haldilal

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J20 is optimized at all altitudes, all speeds, and all overloads. It can be said that it can achieve maneuverability that greatly exceeds the third-generation aircraft in any situation
Ya'll Nibbiars you meant but the Chinese generation system? Right. What about 4.5 generations?.
 

MiG-29SMT

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India has already paid $295 million to Russia for the preliminary design phase. Official said termination meant that all this money has now gone ‘down the drain.’



I humbly repeat my question: did money refund?
J-11 is a typical example of Chinese theft, have China paid Sukhoi? no because they are thieves.

India and Russia has a contract regardless of the cancellations there are some conditions in a contract I do not see Indians complaign about Russian theft, but Sukhoi and Russia did complaign about Chinese theft
 

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China’s J-20 A Decade On: The West’s Least Favourite Stealth Fighter Marks 10 Years Since First Flight


anuary 11th 2020 marks ten years since the first flight of the Chengdu J-20 fifth generation heavyweight fighter - the fourth aircraft of its generation in the world to fly following closely behind the Russian Su-57 a year prior in January 2010. Although Chinese sources had announced that the country had made significant progress in developing a fifth generation fighter in 2010, these reports were widely disregarded in the Western world on the basis that the country’s defence sector was supposedly not sophisticated enough. Western analysts instead speculated that the new Chinese fighter would be a much less advanced ‘4+ generation’ aircraft similar to the European Eurofighter or French Rafale - which were far behind the fifth generation in terms of performance and sophistication.

The public unveiling of the J-20 and official first flight were conducted during a visit by U.S. Defense Secretary Robert Gates to China, which was widely interpreted as a show of force in the wake of the Barak Obama administration’s ‘Pivot to Asia’ initiative aimed squarely at Beijing. Referring to the Chinese leader, Gates stated at the time: “I asked President Hu [Jintao] about it directly, and he said that the test had absolutely nothing to do with my visit and had been a pre-planned test.” Gates downplayed China's ability to develop or operate a fifth generation fighter, and amid widespread speculation in the West that the fighter was no more than a technology demonstrator the defence secretary predicted that the J-20, if indeed genuine, would not become operational before the 2020. Like many high end Chinese weapons programs, the stealth jet repeatedly proved Western expectations to be entirely wrong.

China’s Air Force had previously acquired Soviet built Su-27 heavyweight air superiority fighters of the fourth generation from 1992, which were designed specifically to take on the U.S. Air Force’s own elite heavyweight the F-15 Eagle and were considered overall more capable. While the Su-27 was subsequently produced under license in China and vastly improved, the U.S. inducted a new generation of heavyweight fighters into service from December 2005 with the introduction of the F-22 Raptor. With the F-22 designed specifically to go head to head with the Su-27, China’s J-20 program allowed its Air Force to move forward a generation and go up against the Raptor on favourable terms. The J-20 was the world’s second heavyweight fifth generation fighter to enter service, and joined China's Air Force in March 2017. High end technologies developed for the fighter have helped modernise other aircraft in the Chinese fleet such as the J-10 and J-11 platforms - with the designs since having been upgraded to the J-10C and J-11BG standards.



Among the J-20’s most outstanding features, the fighter’s radar evading stealth profile is considered second only to that of the F-22 among manned fighters making it difficult to target at medium and long ranges. Distributed aperture systems for greater situational awareness and helmet mounted sights to make better use of short ranged missiles both give it significant advantages in short range advantages over its American rival, with the Raptor lacking similar technologies. The J-20’s PL-15 long range air to air missiles use AESA radars making them more precise and more difficult to jam than the AIM-120C and D missiles used by American fighters, which are still guided by much older PESA radars.

Unlike the F-22, which due largely to excessive operational costs saw orders given to terminate production less than four years after entry into service, the J-20 is expected to remain in production for many years to come. It has been widely speculated that a twin seat variant of the fighter, and a variant with a much larger sensor suite to serve as an airborne early warning jet, could be unveiled in the coming years. Other improvements have included the recent integration of WS-10C engines, which have a similar but slightly lower power output than the F119 powering the F-22, with these expected to be replaced before 2025 by the WS-15 which has a much higher power output than either. A new enhanced variant of the J-20, the J-20B, notably entered serial production in 2020 with many more incrementally more sophisticated variants expected to follow. The aircraft are currently being produced at a rate of around 50 per year, with over 150 thought to be either in service or in testing.
 

fire starter

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China’s J-20 A Decade On: The West’s Least Favourite Stealth Fighter Marks 10 Years Since First Flight


anuary 11th 2020 marks ten years since the first flight of the Chengdu J-20 fifth generation heavyweight fighter - the fourth aircraft of its generation in the world to fly following closely behind the Russian Su-57 a year prior in January 2010. Although Chinese sources had announced that the country had made significant progress in developing a fifth generation fighter in 2010, these reports were widely disregarded in the Western world on the basis that the country’s defence sector was supposedly not sophisticated enough. Western analysts instead speculated that the new Chinese fighter would be a much less advanced ‘4+ generation’ aircraft similar to the European Eurofighter or French Rafale - which were far behind the fifth generation in terms of performance and sophistication.

The public unveiling of the J-20 and official first flight were conducted during a visit by U.S. Defense Secretary Robert Gates to China, which was widely interpreted as a show of force in the wake of the Barak Obama administration’s ‘Pivot to Asia’ initiative aimed squarely at Beijing. Referring to the Chinese leader, Gates stated at the time: “I asked President Hu [Jintao] about it directly, and he said that the test had absolutely nothing to do with my visit and had been a pre-planned test.” Gates downplayed China's ability to develop or operate a fifth generation fighter, and amid widespread speculation in the West that the fighter was no more than a technology demonstrator the defence secretary predicted that the J-20, if indeed genuine, would not become operational before the 2020. Like many high end Chinese weapons programs, the stealth jet repeatedly proved Western expectations to be entirely wrong.

China’s Air Force had previously acquired Soviet built Su-27 heavyweight air superiority fighters of the fourth generation from 1992, which were designed specifically to take on the U.S. Air Force’s own elite heavyweight the F-15 Eagle and were considered overall more capable. While the Su-27 was subsequently produced under license in China and vastly improved, the U.S. inducted a new generation of heavyweight fighters into service from December 2005 with the introduction of the F-22 Raptor. With the F-22 designed specifically to go head to head with the Su-27, China’s J-20 program allowed its Air Force to move forward a generation and go up against the Raptor on favourable terms. The J-20 was the world’s second heavyweight fifth generation fighter to enter service, and joined China's Air Force in March 2017. High end technologies developed for the fighter have helped modernise other aircraft in the Chinese fleet such as the J-10 and J-11 platforms - with the designs since having been upgraded to the J-10C and J-11BG standards.



Among the J-20’s most outstanding features, the fighter’s radar evading stealth profile is considered second only to that of the F-22 among manned fighters making it difficult to target at medium and long ranges. Distributed aperture systems for greater situational awareness and helmet mounted sights to make better use of short ranged missiles both give it significant advantages in short range advantages over its American rival, with the Raptor lacking similar technologies. The J-20’s PL-15 long range air to air missiles use AESA radars making them more precise and more difficult to jam than the AIM-120C and D missiles used by American fighters, which are still guided by much older PESA radars.

Unlike the F-22, which due largely to excessive operational costs saw orders given to terminate production less than four years after entry into service, the J-20 is expected to remain in production for many years to come. It has been widely speculated that a twin seat variant of the fighter, and a variant with a much larger sensor suite to serve as an airborne early warning jet, could be unveiled in the coming years. Other improvements have included the recent integration of WS-10C engines, which have a similar but slightly lower power output than the F119 powering the F-22, with these expected to be replaced before 2025 by the WS-15 which has a much higher power output than either. A new enhanced variant of the J-20, the J-20B, notably entered serial production in 2020 with many more incrementally more sophisticated variants expected to follow. The aircraft are currently being produced at a rate of around 50 per year, with over 150 thought to be either in service or in testing.
The production rate of 50 aircraft per year is fake.
 

johnq

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The production rate of 50 aircraft per year is fake.
Everything is fake. They couldn't make a reliable WS-10 engine so they keep releasing newer iterations of it like WS-10C and touting it as successful, when the reality is that even the WS-10C is not very reliable and has much lower thrust than what is required. The WS-15 was the original engine destined for J-20, but they couldn't make it work (exploded during testing, and was throwing fan blades due to inadequate experience with single crystal blade technology). Same thing is true for J-20, the earlier versions have had issues with avionics and sensors which didn't work as expected so the PLAAF just keeps putting out new iterations like J-20B without solving the problems. There are just too many gaps in technology for PLAAF to make a true fifth generation fighter, so what they have is something with weak thrust to weight ratio, weak sensors and avionics, and only marginally reduced RCS due to their failure in terms of being able to hide the radar/radome radar reflection from the front as well as problems and limitations in materials technology to reduce the RCS of a fighter, due to their radar absorbent materials not being good enough. CCP/PLAAF mantra is: Fake it till you make it. PLAAF is simply trying to bluff its way around its failures associated with the J-20, probably for propaganda reasons to keep common Chinese people impressed. Showcasing a few flights at sea level with prototypes for propaganda reasons is not the same thing as a fully operational fighter that has solved all of its problems.
 
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rockdog

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Everything is fake. They couldn't make a reliable WS-10 engine so they keep releasing newer iterations of it like WS-10C and touting it as successful, when the reality is that even the WS-10C is not very reliable and has much lower thrust than what is required. The WS-15 was the original engine destined for J-20, but they couldn't make it work (exploded during testing, and was throwing fan blades due to inadequate experience with single crystal blade technology). Same thing is true for J-20, the earlier versions have had issues with avionics and sensors which didn't work as expected so the PLAAF just keeps putting out new iterations like J-20B without solving the problems. There are just too many gaps in technology for PLAAF to make a true fifth generation fighter, so what they have is something with weak thrust to weight ratio, weak sensors and avionics, and only marginally reduced RCS due to their failure in terms of being able to hide the radar/radome radar reflection from the front as well as problems and limitations in materials technology to reduce the RCS of a fighter, due to their radar absorbent materials not being good enough. CCP/PLAAF mantra is: Fake it till you make it. PLAAF is simply trying to bluff its way around its failures associated with the J-20, probably for propaganda reasons to keep common Chinese people impressed. Showcasing a few flights at sea level with prototypes for propaganda reasons is not the same thing as a fully operational fighter that has solved all of its problems.
Did IA get prepaid money to Russian Pak-fa project back?
 

MiG-29SMT

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China’s J-20 A Decade On: The West’s Least Favourite Stealth Fighter Marks 10 Years Since First Flight


anuary 11th 2020 marks ten years since the first flight of the Chengdu J-20 fifth generation heavyweight fighter - the fourth aircraft of its generation in the world to fly following closely behind the Russian Su-57 a year prior in January 2010. Although Chinese sources had announced that the country had made significant progress in developing a fifth generation fighter in 2010, these reports were widely disregarded in the Western world on the basis that the country’s defence sector was supposedly not sophisticated enough. Western analysts instead speculated that the new Chinese fighter would be a much less advanced ‘4+ generation’ aircraft similar to the European Eurofighter or French Rafale - which were far behind the fifth generation in terms of performance and sophistication.

The public unveiling of the J-20 and official first flight were conducted during a visit by U.S. Defense Secretary Robert Gates to China, which was widely interpreted as a show of force in the wake of the Barak Obama administration’s ‘Pivot to Asia’ initiative aimed squarely at Beijing. Referring to the Chinese leader, Gates stated at the time: “I asked President Hu [Jintao] about it directly, and he said that the test had absolutely nothing to do with my visit and had been a pre-planned test.” Gates downplayed China's ability to develop or operate a fifth generation fighter, and amid widespread speculation in the West that the fighter was no more than a technology demonstrator the defence secretary predicted that the J-20, if indeed genuine, would not become operational before the 2020. Like many high end Chinese weapons programs, the stealth jet repeatedly proved Western expectations to be entirely wrong.

China’s Air Force had previously acquired Soviet built Su-27 heavyweight air superiority fighters of the fourth generation from 1992, which were designed specifically to take on the U.S. Air Force’s own elite heavyweight the F-15 Eagle and were considered overall more capable. While the Su-27 was subsequently produced under license in China and vastly improved, the U.S. inducted a new generation of heavyweight fighters into service from December 2005 with the introduction of the F-22 Raptor. With the F-22 designed specifically to go head to head with the Su-27, China’s J-20 program allowed its Air Force to move forward a generation and go up against the Raptor on favourable terms. The J-20 was the world’s second heavyweight fifth generation fighter to enter service, and joined China's Air Force in March 2017. High end technologies developed for the fighter have helped modernise other aircraft in the Chinese fleet such as the J-10 and J-11 platforms - with the designs since having been upgraded to the J-10C and J-11BG standards.



Among the J-20’s most outstanding features, the fighter’s radar evading stealth profile is considered second only to that of the F-22 among manned fighters making it difficult to target at medium and long ranges. Distributed aperture systems for greater situational awareness and helmet mounted sights to make better use of short ranged missiles both give it significant advantages in short range advantages over its American rival, with the Raptor lacking similar technologies. The J-20’s PL-15 long range air to air missiles use AESA radars making them more precise and more difficult to jam than the AIM-120C and D missiles used by American fighters, which are still guided by much older PESA radars.

Unlike the F-22, which due largely to excessive operational costs saw orders given to terminate production less than four years after entry into service, the J-20 is expected to remain in production for many years to come. It has been widely speculated that a twin seat variant of the fighter, and a variant with a much larger sensor suite to serve as an airborne early warning jet, could be unveiled in the coming years. Other improvements have included the recent integration of WS-10C engines, which have a similar but slightly lower power output than the F119 powering the F-22, with these expected to be replaced before 2025 by the WS-15 which has a much higher power output than either. A new enhanced variant of the J-20, the J-20B, notably entered serial production in 2020 with many more incrementally more sophisticated variants expected to follow. The aircraft are currently being produced at a rate of around 50 per year, with over 150 thought to be either in service or in testing.
J-20 is not near to F-22


First its canards have dihedral while the wings anhedral, thus respect the nacelle and intake walls the angles are different ruining its planform aligment for stealth purposes.

Add its ventral fins which also interact with diffraction and add 2 additional reflecting surfaces.

Speed wise F-22 supercruises, it means if J-20 fires PL-15 (thinking it has the advertized and thought range) the PL-15 is chasing a mach 1.7 target reducing the range of the PL-15 considerably.

F-22 by flying faster increases the range of AIM-120s.

By being faster and stealthier the J-20 has lower chances to get F-22.


F-22 can use thrust vectoring at supersonic speeds, allowing for high roll rates since the tailplanes do not control pitch, just roll.

J-20 uses canards handiccaping its already RCS signature,

For the J-20 in order to fly fast needs afterburner that means more fuel and higher IR signature.

F-22 can use F-35 to hit and viceversa.


Su-57 has even better thrust vectoring control nozzles and lower frontal cross section.
 

MiG-29SMT

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China’s J-20 A Decade On: The West’s Least Favourite Stealth Fighter Marks 10 Years Since First Flight


anuary 11th 2020 marks ten years since the first flight of the Chengdu J-20 fifth generation heavyweight fighter - the fourth aircraft of its generation in the world to fly following closely behind the Russian Su-57 a year prior in January 2010. Although Chinese sources had announced that the country had made significant progress in developing a fifth generation fighter in 2010, these reports were widely disregarded in the Western world on the basis that the country’s defence sector was supposedly not sophisticated enough. Western analysts instead speculated that the new Chinese fighter would be a much less advanced ‘4+ generation’ aircraft similar to the European Eurofighter or French Rafale - which were far behind the fifth generation in terms of performance and sophistication.

The public unveiling of the J-20 and official first flight were conducted during a visit by U.S. Defense Secretary Robert Gates to China, which was widely interpreted as a show of force in the wake of the Barak Obama administration’s ‘Pivot to Asia’ initiative aimed squarely at Beijing. Referring to the Chinese leader, Gates stated at the time: “I asked President Hu [Jintao] about it directly, and he said that the test had absolutely nothing to do with my visit and had been a pre-planned test.” Gates downplayed China's ability to develop or operate a fifth generation fighter, and amid widespread speculation in the West that the fighter was no more than a technology demonstrator the defence secretary predicted that the J-20, if indeed genuine, would not become operational before the 2020. Like many high end Chinese weapons programs, the stealth jet repeatedly proved Western expectations to be entirely wrong.

China’s Air Force had previously acquired Soviet built Su-27 heavyweight air superiority fighters of the fourth generation from 1992, which were designed specifically to take on the U.S. Air Force’s own elite heavyweight the F-15 Eagle and were considered overall more capable. While the Su-27 was subsequently produced under license in China and vastly improved, the U.S. inducted a new generation of heavyweight fighters into service from December 2005 with the introduction of the F-22 Raptor. With the F-22 designed specifically to go head to head with the Su-27, China’s J-20 program allowed its Air Force to move forward a generation and go up against the Raptor on favourable terms. The J-20 was the world’s second heavyweight fifth generation fighter to enter service, and joined China's Air Force in March 2017. High end technologies developed for the fighter have helped modernise other aircraft in the Chinese fleet such as the J-10 and J-11 platforms - with the designs since having been upgraded to the J-10C and J-11BG standards.



Among the J-20’s most outstanding features, the fighter’s radar evading stealth profile is considered second only to that of the F-22 among manned fighters making it difficult to target at medium and long ranges. Distributed aperture systems for greater situational awareness and helmet mounted sights to make better use of short ranged missiles both give it significant advantages in short range advantages over its American rival, with the Raptor lacking similar technologies. The J-20’s PL-15 long range air to air missiles use AESA radars making them more precise and more difficult to jam than the AIM-120C and D missiles used by American fighters, which are still guided by much older PESA radars.

Unlike the F-22, which due largely to excessive operational costs saw orders given to terminate production less than four years after entry into service, the J-20 is expected to remain in production for many years to come. It has been widely speculated that a twin seat variant of the fighter, and a variant with a much larger sensor suite to serve as an airborne early warning jet, could be unveiled in the coming years. Other improvements have included the recent integration of WS-10C engines, which have a similar but slightly lower power output than the F119 powering the F-22, with these expected to be replaced before 2025 by the WS-15 which has a much higher power output than either. A new enhanced variant of the J-20, the J-20B, notably entered serial production in 2020 with many more incrementally more sophisticated variants expected to follow. The aircraft are currently being produced at a rate of around 50 per year, with over 150 thought to be either in service or in testing.
Ideal canards for aerodynamic reasons =Rafale

Ideal canard for stealth X-36

J-20 not the best for aerodynamics nor stealth
1620901791120.png


Rafale aerodynamic studies, it shows the excellent aerodynamic of its production configuration and single vertical tail
1620902089193.png



J-20 contrary to F-22 that has a smooth blend of its tail booms has coarse and thick tailboom endings, compared to MiG-1.44 has more drag
1620902232608.png


1620902351323.png

These top views of the J-20 and Eurofighter, show that the J-20 has its main wing at a farther aft position than the Eurofighter`s main wing and its canards are closer to the center of gravity, than the ones of Eurofighter Typhoon; in terms of effectiveness, the Eurofighter design is more effective since it can reduce the size of the canard with respect its wing and its lever arm is more effective.

The Typhoon also has a canard with lower swept than its wing to understand it let us see:



Minimum induced drag is obtained for the 25-degree canard at low lift coefficients for both research models regardless of canard position. The 60-degree canard had the highest value of induced drag at low lift coefficients and the lowest value at lift coefficients near (C L) max lift coefficients. the Intermediate canards C0 and L2 have values between the 25- and 60-degree canards. Thus, for good low lift performance characteristics, i.e., range and endurance, the low sweep canard Is best. When maneuvering capability is the dominant design factor, the highly swept canard generates the best performance. The Intermediate canards are good compromises having lower Induced drag than the 60-degree delta shaped canard at low lift coefficients and slightly higher values of induced drag near maximum lift.



AERODYNAMIC CHARACTERISTICS OF THE CLOSE-COUPLED CANARD AS APPLIED TO LOW-TO.MODERATE SWEPT WINGS VOLUME 2: SUBSONIC SPEED REGIME by David W Lacay



LifT to drag/ ratio In still optimized at positions forward of the canard wing overlap. As with, (L/D))max, lowering the canard reduced the lift to drag ratio.



Position has a minimal effect of C but moving the canard forward and downward increased minimum drag.



AERODYNAMIC CHARACTERISTICS OF THE CLOSE-COUPLED CANARD AS APPLIED TO LOW-TO.MODERATE SWEPT WINGS VOLUME 2: SUBSONIC SPEED REGIME by David W Lacay





It is pretty obvious the Eurofighter`s canard is for lower drag thus trying t increase range at very low AoA and level cruise flight, J-20 is further limited in the sense stealth forces the canard to have the same swept angle than its wing
 

MiG-29SMT

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I have a simple question, J-20 fighter has much threat in Asia? 🤔
We all hope "aviation experts" can answe.
View attachment 89611
it has some threat, as Su-57 or Rafale or even F-15 or Su-35.


Stealth does not mean invisible to radar, it means lower electromagnetic return at certain angles or radar spikes.

The flat surfaces of any stealth aircraft reflect a very powerful bounce reflection at a direction but at lower radar bounce reflection at another.

Aligning the planform means engineers need align all the radar reflecting surfaces to a direction the aircraft is not flying to.


Stealth can be defeated by numerous ways, but also makes the defence system more expensive.


Stealth degrades aerodynamics and reduces aerodynamic efficiency

Aerodynamically speaking Rafale or MiG-1.44 have more efficient aerodynamics than F-22 or F-35 and J-20.

Thrust vectoring has advantages but is not a cure for low turn rates since it only improves turn rate 9%.

Post stall handing is for safety and some type of engagements where you have few aircraft fighting, but modern off bored missiles like AIM-9X render it not needed at close combat so it is more for safety.

Stealth increases size and weight because it needs to carry more fuel and weaponry for a given size constraign.

Thus you need more powerful engines, J-20 did not get those engines yet.
So it is highly underpowered making in its sustained turn rate very low.

To understand stealth and aerodynamics

MiG-29 at low combat weight has a turn rate of 28 deg/sec with no weapons.
armed with 4 missiles 22 deg/sec

F-22 has 28 deg/s armed but has engines twice as powerful as RD-33, so it has 4 RD-33 equivalent thrust.


J-20 has not better engines than Su-27 and has ventral fins, rounded jet pipes and canards with dihedral has high radar cross section than F-22.


At this moment it has no thrust vectoring nozzles.

Conclusion is an improvement over Su-27/J-11 in Radar cross section reduction but it does not warranty inmunity to radar detection nor it warranty better close combat skills versus a highly off bored missile fired by an F-15 or F-35.

Also it has 2 engines meaning higher costs and the need for 2 engines unlike F-35 means lower production rate.

Conclusion F-35 in numbers will surpass J-20
 
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Alien_cat26

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it has some threat, as Su-57 or Rafale or even F-15 or Su-35.


Stealth does not mean invisible to radar, it means lower electromagnetic return at certain angles or radar spikes.

The flat surfaces of any stealth aircraft reflect a very powerful bounce reflection at a direction but at lower radar bounce reflection at another.

Aligning the planform means engineers need align all the radar reflecting surfaces to a direction the aircraft is not flying to.


Stealth can be defeated by numerous ways, but also makes the defence system more expensive.


Stealth degrades aerodynamics and reduces aerodynamic efficiency

Aerodynamically speaking Rafale or MiG-1.44 have more efficient aerodynamics than F-22 or F-35 and J-20.

Thrust vectoring has advantages but is not a cure for low turn rates since it only improves turn rate 9%.

Post stall handing is for safety and some type of engagements where you have few aircraft fighting, but modern off bored missiles like AIM-9X render it not needed at close combat so it is more for safety.

Stealth increases size and weight because it needs to carry more fuel and weaponry for a given size constraign.

Thus you need more powerful engines, J-20 did not get those engines yet.
So it is highly underpowered making in its sustained turn rate very low.

To understand stealth and aerodynamics
Thanks for the comment. 👍
This is the more pertinent rating I have seen for the J-20 fighter since I entered the DFI. In addition, I am very curious about the production of J-20 fighters. It is known that the F-35 has won the production number, but will there be any changes in 5 years? 🤔
 

MiG-29SMT

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I will tell you that the USA has far better aircraft than China, F-22 is old first flown almost 3 decades ago, Russia is in a worse situation than the USAF, it has not been surpassed by China but it has less technological edge over China.

China will not surpass the USA, they lack the technology, in aerospace China is dependant of USA technologies and you can see how many providers has C 919.

the US has a new 6th generation aircraft flying as we speak and plans to retire F-22 in the 2030s.

J-20 is a medium threat weapon because the USA is now in the next generation.
 

Alien_cat26

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I will tell you that the USA has far better aircraft than China, F-22 is old first flown almost 3 decades ago, Russia is in a worse situation than the USAF, it has not been surpassed by China but it has less technological edge over China.

China will not surpass the USA, they lack the technology, in aerospace China is dependant of USA technologies and you can see how many providers has C 919.

the US has a new 6th generation aircraft flying as we speak and plans to retire F-22 in the 2030s.

J-20 is a medium threat weapon because the USA is now in the next generation.
Agree with you , it is true that the competitiveness (military) of the current aviation power is only China, U. S and Russia.
China may be relatively poor in key technologies. For example, the research and development of aeroengines has been lagging behind, but it may be the fastest growing in these 20 years. In particular, the service of the J-20 stealth aircraft warfare has officially entered the high class of aviation.

Just a nice pic ( 三七V博 from Weibo )

E1VE-4sXIAQ6xGS.jpg

Can be deleted if there is a sign violation
 

MiG-29SMT

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Agree with you , it is true that the competitiveness (military) of the current aviation power is only China, U. S and Russia.
China may be relatively poor in key technologies. For example, the research and development of aeroengines has been lagging behind, but it may be the fastest growing in these 20 years. In particular, the service of the J-20 stealth aircraft warfare has officially entered the high class of aviation.

Just a nice pic ( 三七V博 from Weibo )

View attachment 89676
Can be deleted if there is a sign violation
the aviation market is not dominated by 3 nations.
An-178 from Ukraine
1620985645430.png

Rafale is a very good aircraft and so is Gripen and Eurofighter.
1620985506047.png

South Korea and Turkey also are building military aircraft.
1620985463927.png

If you mean which nations are comitted to make stealth fighters well
Italy, Germany, France, England build fighters and are building 4.5 Generations and a 6th generation.

In aviation there are many countries building aircraft, air forces are not only fighters.

India also is commited to build 5th generation fighters and already builds LCA which is a Mirage 2000 equivalent.
1620985292259.png

Brazil makes AWACs and cargo aircraft, Japan makes patrol and cargo aircraft.
1620985344327.png

1620985406357.png

1620985595179.png

Building fighters is so expensive and fruitless to some degree since hour flights are in the region $10000 to $40000 USD dollars that most aircraft still fly MiG-21s or F-5s and some Kfirs and Mirage IIIs.

Aircraft building is far more crowded see this website and later you will see there are so many aircraft projects
 
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