Indian Navy Developments & Discussions

Yusuf

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5 ships a year is good if pipavav can do it that too large boats like carriers and destroyers. Good news all round. Private participation has to increase in the defense sector.
 

lambu

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India developing Karwar as 3rd major naval base on west coast

NEW DELHI (PTI): India is moving fast to set-up its third major naval base after Mumbai and Cochin on the western coast at Karwar in Karnataka.

Defence Minister A K Antony will inaugurate an integrated defence-civilian township at Karwar on May 21 with 326 dwelling units under "Project Seabird", also known as Karwar Project.

"The township will accommodate defence and civilian employees posted at Karwar. It is part of the Project Seabird which was aimed to transform Karwar into a state-of-art major naval base on western coast with docking facilities for an aircraft carrier-size vessel," Navy officials said.

Completed at a cost of Rs 2400 crore approximately, the phase one of the project has seen commissioning of base ship INS Kadamba in 2005 and a ship-lift facility in 2006 along with a hospital and the township which would be inaugurated on Saturday.

"Presently, 10 different ships of various class and size are based at Karwar, biggest of them being a tanker-vessel," the officials added.

The foundation stone for Project Seabird was laid down by the then Prime Minister Rajeev Gandhi in 1986, but the plan went through massive delays because of financial crunch.

The Defence Minister will also inaugurate a ship-lift facility for constructing naval vessels at Goa Shipyard Limited. He would be accompanied by Chief of Naval Staff Admiral Nirmal Verma and other senior officers of Western Naval Command.

India developing Karwar as 3rd major naval base on west coast - Brahmand.com
 

lambu

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Sea Bird naval project phase-2 to be completed by 2017-18


SIRSI (Karnataka): Defence Minister A K Antony today said the Phase-II of Sea Bird naval project, to be completed by 2017-18, would have ultra modern facilities for berthing at least 30 warships at Karwar in Karnataka.

The Centre also has a plan to take up another expansion to ensure that Karwar naval base can handle 50 major warships, he said, after inaugurating an integrated defence-civilian township.

Karwar would not only decongest the over-crowded Mumbai harbour but also provide India with much-needed strategic depth and operational flexibility on the western seaboard, Antony said.

The Centre had already paid Rs 127 crore compensation to those displaced by the project, he said, adding the government awaited the Supreme Court verdict on a petition filed by Naval authorities challenging Karnataka High Court order directing it to pay Rs 1,500 as compensation per gunta of land (one gunta is 1/40th of an acre) acquired for the project.

The Defence Minister said once the apex court verdict was pronounced, the second phase of the project would commence.

On Netrani Island being used by the Naval base though it was declared as bio-diversity heritage site by the state, Antony said the Naval base will ensure that environmental concerns were addressed.

Responding to a plea by District In-charge Minister Vishweshwar Hegde Kageri that local youth be provided employment opportunities, Antony said over 1,500 ITI personnel have been recruited for providing technical training to the locals who had been affected by Sea Bird naval project.

Sea Bird naval project phase-2 to be completed by 2017-18 - The Economic Times
 

lambu

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India to boost 'blue-water' warfare punch with two new stealth frigates

NEW DELHI: The Navy continues to hone its war-fighting capabilities despite being stretched in coastal security and anti-piracy operations. The force is now on course to soon induct two more deadly stealth frigates to bolster its growing "blue-water" warfare capabilities.

Sources say the 6,200-tonne indigenous stealth frigate INS Satpura is likely to be commissioned in June-July, while the Russian-built 4,900-tonne INS Teg should finally be ready for induction by September-October.

These long-awaited warships will come at a time when Navy chief Admiral Nirmal Verma has stressed that "maintenance of war-fighting abilities" remains the "top-most priority" for his force despite the "large number of peacetime commitments (anti-piracy, coastal security and the like) at hand".

"With the security situation being fluid, we need to maintain the organizational ability to deploy warships, submarines and aircraft at immediate notice," said Admiral Verma, at the naval commanders' conference here on Tuesday.

INS Satpura and INS Teg will certainly boost combat capabilities, packed as they are with sensors, weapons and missile systems, coupled with their stealthy nature due to "vastly-reduced" radar, infra-red, noise, frequency and magnetic "signatures" to beat enemy detection systems.

That's not all. INS Satpura, the second of three indigenous stealth frigates built under the Rs 8,101-crore Project-17 at Mazagon Docks, will be followed by INS Sahyadri after six months. The first, INS Shivalik, was commissioned in April last year.

Similarly, INS Teg is to be followed by its sister frigates, INS Tarkash and INS Trikhand, built under a Rs 5,514-crore project inked with Russia in July 2006, after gaps of six months each.

Both the Indian and Russian projects, of course, have been dogged by huge time and cost overruns. The three warships from Russia are actually "a follow-on order" to the first three frigates, INS Talwar, INS Trishul and INS Tabar, inducted by India in 2003-2004 at a cost of over Rs 3,000 crore.

Though their induction too was delayed, the Navy is quite happy with the power the Talwar-class frigates pack. The warships have "a very high weapon and sensor density", including eight vertical launch cells for the 'Klub-N' anti-ship and anti-submarine cruise missiles. In addition, the three new frigates will also be armed with the 290-km BrahMos supersonic cruise missiles.

The Shivalik-class frigates, in turn, can also deal with "multiple-threats" in all three dimensions -- air, surface and sub-surface. Apart from Russian Shtil surface-to-air missile systems and Klub anti-ship cruise missiles, they are also armed with the Israeli 'Barak-I' anti-missile defence systems to guard against Harpoon and Exocet missiles, launched from platforms like P-3C Orion aircraft and Agosta-90B submarines which Pakistan has acquired from US and France.

The defence ministry has also approved Project-17A to construct seven more frigates at Mazagon Docks and GRSE in Kolkata, with even more stealth features, for around Rs 45,000 crore. In all, the Navy has around 30 new warships and six submarines on order as of now to maintain its force-levels at about 140 combatants.


:: Bharat-Rakshak.com - Indian Military News Headlines ::


India To Induct Two New Stealth Frigates

Defence News - India To Induct Two New Stealth Frigates
 
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lambu

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Indian Navy's 3rd Talwar class frigate to be launched Wednesday

KALININGRAD (BNS): Russia's Yantar shipyard will float out Indian Navy's third Talwar-class guided missile frigate, INS Trikand, on Wednesday.

The new class of warship, being built at the Baltic Shipyard in Kaliningrad, under Project 11356, will be launched in the presence of high level Indian and Russian defence and other officials, according to Rus Navy.

The Yantar shipyard was awarded a $1.6 billion contract in 2006 to build three modified Talwar class (known as Krivak III class in Russia) guided missile frigates for the Indian Navy.

It had floated out the first warship, INS Teg, in November 2009. The vessel entered sea trials in March this year. The second vessel – INS Tarkash – was launched in June, 2010.

The new class of frigates has been designed to accomplish a wide range of missions, primarily finding and eliminating enemy submarines and large surface ships.

With a displacement of 4,000 tons and speeds of 30 knots, the new frigate will be armed with BRAHMOS supersonic cruise missiles.

Each warship will also be equipped with a 100-mm gun, a Shtil air defence system, two Kashtan air defence gun/missile systems, two twin 533-mm torpedo tubes, and an anti-submarine warfare helicopter.

Russia expects to deliver all three frigates to the Indian Navy in 2011-2012.

Indian Navy presently operates three Talwar class frigates – INS Talwar, INS Tabar and INS Trishul – which were handed over to it by Russia in 2003-2004 under a 1997 contract.

Indian Navy's 3rd Talwar class frigate to be launched Wednesday - Brahmand.com
 

vikramrana_1812

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op naval commanders review coastal security, anti-piracy operations


More at : Top naval commanders review coastal security, anti-piracy operations Top naval commanders review coastal security, anti-piracy operations

New Delhi, May 24 (IANS) Top naval commanders Tuesday began a four-day conference here to review the security situation in the region in the backdrop of terror strikes in the South Asian neighbourhood, apart from threats posed by Somali pirates closer to Indian shores.
In the four-day biannual meet to be addressed by Defence Minister A.K. Antony Wednesday, the commanders of important operational formations, led by Navy chief Admiral Nirmal Verma, will also assess the preparedness of naval combatants, in particular the organisational ability to deploy warships, submarines and aviation assets at short notice, both for conventional and peacetime missions.
"The naval commanders conference for 2011 started at New Delhi today (Tuesday). Over the next four days, the commanders of the Indian Navy will discuss issues of operational relevance and future plans," a navy spokesperson said here in a press release.
"This biannual forum also provides an opportunity for the Chief of the Naval Staff to examine the operational readiness of the Indian Navy; assess the progress made in key projects; and initiate functional, organisational and administrative steps necessary to further enhance the Indian Navy's readiness for current and emerging challenges," he said.
Addressing the naval commanders on the subject of operational readiness, Admiral Verma pointed out that "with the security situation being fluid, we need to maintain the organisational ability to deploy ships, submarines and aircraft at immediate notice".
Drawing the commanders' attention to "large number of peacetime commitments at hand", he also noted that "maintenance of war-fighting abilities remained the top-most priority".
Following the November 2008 Mumbai terror strikes, the navy has been given overall responsibility of securing the 7,500-km-long Indian coastline and vital installations from non-conventional threats such as terrorist attacks.
The navy has effectively put in place a mechanism for coordination among all Indian maritime agencies such as the Coast Guard, customs, marine police, shipping, ports and fisheries. It has also set up joint operations centres on both the eastern and western fronts for coordinated intelligence gathering, sharing and analysis, apart from carrying out combined operations on those inputs.
It has also raised a 1,000-man strong Sagar Prahari Bal, a specialist force for providing security to vital military and strategic installations along the coast.
Regarding the threat from pirates in the Arabian Sea, Verma said the ongoing thrust on anti-piracy operations should be sustained. Apart from destroying about half a dozen motherships of the pirates, the navy has in recent months nabbed about 120 sea brigands and sent them to jail in Mumbai.
Verma highlighted the criticality of "maritime domain awareness" to all aspects of naval operations and recalled the "the vision and contribution" of the Indian Navy in the National Command, Control, Communication and Intelligence Network (NC3I).
The conference will review all aspects of operational, material and logistics preparedness of the navy, apart from discussing the force-level accretion in accordance with the navy's long term perspective plans and how best to leverage the new defence procurement procedure to build ships within India over the next 15 years at a faster pace with international benchmarks of costs and quality.
The meeting would also discuss the plans for induction of its main combatants such as the Gorshkov aircraft carrier by December 2012, integration of MiG-29K fighter jets on board the carrier, P8I maritime reconnaissance aircraft, indigenous aircraft carriers, and Scorpene submarines and its follow-on orders.

 

vikramrana_1812

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Maritime piracy can be defeated if UN takes lead: Antony


More at : Maritime piracy can be defeated if UN takes lead: Antony Maritime piracy can be defeated if UN takes lead: Antony

Panaji, May 21 (IANS) Only combined and cohesive anti-piracy action led by the United Nations (UN) can rid the world of the scourge of piracy, Defence Minister A.K. Anthony said here Saturday.
"Unless there is combined effort under the United Nations (UN), the effectiveness of fighting piracy won't be achieved. For that the talks are already going on," said the minister, who was in Goa to inaugurate the phased modernization programme of the Goa Shipyard Limited (GSL), a public sector enterprise that builds vessels for the defence ministry.
Speaking to reporters in the port town of Vasco, Antony also asked people not to "expect miracles", when it came to tackling the issue international piracy that is hampering global maritime trade.
"Don't expect miracles. We are continuously strengthening our navy which is working in anti-piracy operations in tandem with other nations like the US, the UK and France," Antony said, adding that the problem of sea piracy has reached the "backyard of India".
"The Indian Navy in last one year has substantially increased deployment of its forces in anti-piracy operations in Gulf of Eden along with other nations," the defence minister said.

 

vikramrana_1812

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Coast Guard commissions new station in Gujarat


New Delhi, May 19 (IANS) India Thursday opened a new Coast Guard station at Mundra in Gujarat's Kutch district in an effort to shore up the coastal security apparatus close to maritime border with Pakistan.
The station, ICGS Mundra, was commissioned by Coast Guard Director General Vice Admiral Anil Chopra.
"The new station at Mundra will play an effective role in undertaking joint coastal patrols along with the marine police, customs and fisheries departments to thwart maritime security threats in the sensitive coastal region of Gujarat," a Coast Guard press release said here.
Commandant R.K. Srivastava has been appointed the first commanding officer of the station.
The commissioning was witnessed by Coast Guard northwest region commander Deputy Inspector General B.S. Yadav, besides officers and men of the Indian Coast Guard and representatives of various state government agencies.
The Coast Guard also plans to soon open another station at Pipavav in Gujarat.
In response to its enhanced role, the service is pursuing urgent enhancement of its surveillance capabilities to effectively meet its tasks and responsibilities.
The present force-levels and manpower are being doubled, with proportionate and corresponding infrastructure development and augmentation of trained manpower.
India has been carrying out a massive coastal security beef-up in the aftermath of the November 2008 Mumbai terror attack via the sea route.
By the end of 2012, there will be a total of 42 Coast Guard stations, five air stations and 10 air cnclaves functioning from various locations along the coast.
Apart from increase in force levels and manpower of the Coast Guard, the Indian Navy too would be augmented with new warships and manpower, including 30 warships on order and a new 1,000-man Sagar Prahari Bal (naval infantry) to protect vital coastal installations.
 

vikramrana_1812

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Antony to commission modernised Goa Shipyard Saturday


New Delhi, May 19 (IANS) To facilitate the building of new generation warships, Defence Minister A.K. Antony will Saturday commission a Rs. 400-crore infrastructure modernisation project at the Goa Shipyard Limited (GSL).
The first and second phases of the recently-completed modernisation project will boost the shiplift facility, piers, two repair berths and transfer area at the premier defence public sector undertaking, an official statement Thursday said.
"Setting the ball rolling for creation of new generation vessels, the defence minister will commission the first and second phases of Goa Shipyard Limited's (GSL) infrastructure modernisation project on Saturday. Completed at a cost of Rs. 400 crore, the project will boost the shiplift facility and piers, two repair berths and transfer area at the premier defence shipyard," a defence ministry release said.
The shiplift system at GSL will be the first of its kind in defence shipyards in the country. Antony will also also lay the foundation stone for the third and fourth phases of GSL's modernisation project on the occasion, the release said.
The commissioning of the shiplift facility will coincide with the launching by the defence minister's wife Elizabeth Antony of the third in the series of naval offshore patrol vessels indigenously designed and being built by GSL for the Indian Navy.
The first and second phases of GSL modernisation was completed in a record 28 months since the foundation stone was laid by Antony on Jan. 21, 2009.
"The four-phased modernisation plan, with a budget of Rs. 800 crore, aims at creating capacity in the shipyard for the production of cutting-edge technology warships. It aims at creating new facilities and infrastructure, whilst augmenting existing facilities in order to achieve the qualitative and quantitative objectives of building and delivering quality ships at competitive cost with shorter construction periods, increased capacity, product mix and shortened delivery times," the release said.
"Once completed, it will substantially augment the yard's capacity to fabricate and construct steel, aluminum and GRP hull vessels to nearly three times," it added.
The defence minister will also visit the upcoming naval base at Karwar in Karnataka, where he will inaugurate a naval civilian township at Amdalli.
"The township, built at a cost of over Rs. 145 crore, comprises 336 houses for civilian employees of the naval base, power and water supply systems, sewage treatment plant and a secured boundary," the release said.
For the second phase of Project Seabird, as the Karwar base is called, a nod is awaited from the Cabinet Committee on Security for another township for uniformed personnel of the naval base that will comprise 3,104 dwelling units, schools, sports facilities and a swimming pool.
Project Seabird — the foundation stone for which was laid by then prime minister Rajiv Gandhi on Oct. 24, 1986 — was set up to facilitate construction of infrastructure and facilities for a greenfield naval base at Karwar. The first phase of the project, at a cost of Rs. 2,628.82 crore, envisages facilities for basing of 11 ships and 10 other craft.
 

chex3009

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India not to arrest any more pirates

NEW DELHI: Somali pirates were brought by the dozen to Mumbai as trophies of India's aggressive fight against piracy in recent times. But no more, officials told TOI.

The government has effected a policy shift in its anti-piracy operations, asking Navy not to arrest any more pirates, and also not to bring them to India's mainland. The government fears that its aggressive operations, especially the arrest of pirates and their incarceration in Mumbai, may have backfired. Somali pirates are retaliating against India's proactive stand by targeting Indian sailors, the security establishment believes. Presently, 43 Indian sailors are in the custody of pirates.

The situation is worrying for India, given the fact that over 10% of total seafarers working for shipping companies around the world are Indians. "We believe they are retaliating. Recently, while rest of their colleagues was released, seven Indians on a particular ship were taken to Somalia. We are still waiting to hear from them," a senior official said.

Navy sources said this new policy shift would stay at least till all Indians in pirates' custody were released. Confirming that the "policy nudge" was already in place, another source said that during the last operation off the southern coast three weeks ago, the Navy did not arrest pirates.

Navy's present strategy is to disarm pirates of "piracy triggers", items such as rope, ladder, arms and ammunition that are used in piracy, and force them out of Indian waters. "Hold, disarm and leave," an officer described the strategy.

The policy shift comes at a time when Prime Minister Manmohan Singh has called on the UN to take the lead in developing a "comprehensive and effective response" to piracy. Piracy also figures on top of the PM's agenda during his ongoing Africa visit.

A senior official in another agency said the Indian approach towards piracy itself was being recast and not just because of pirates targeting Indian sailors. He said the pirates in Mumbai were of "no value at all" to security agencies. "They are neither terrorists nor are they of any other value to us. So we have booked them under Arms Act and violations of other Indian laws. We will have to take care of them now," he said.

Report : Times of India
 

RPK

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Australian naval vessel HMAS Stuart arrives in Mumbai

Australian naval vessel HMAS Stuart arrives in Mumbai - Hindustan Times


The Australian naval vessel HMAS Stuart has arrived in Mumbai as a part of the ongoing navy exchange programme between India and Australia. The ship, that has been in service in the Middle East since Jan 2011 and is now on its way back to Australia, reached Mumbai on Friday. HMAS Stuart is a surfac
e combat naval vessel and works jointly with Indian Navy in the Indian Ocean.

A reception was held on board for the guests invited by the Australian consulate general and the captain.

"Australia greatly values the good working relationship between the Royal Australian Navy and the Indian Navy," Consul General Steve Waters said.

"As two of the largest countries bordering the Indian Ocean, it is important that as democracies with shared values, we work together to enhance peace, stability and the safety of transport in this region. Bilateral naval visits and the joint exercises are a vital part of this process," he said.
 

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