Hint for a Coup? Democracy Has Not Been Tailored To Pakistan's Environment: Pervez Musharraf

sorcerer

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Democracy Has Not Been Tailored To Pakistan's Environment: Pervez Musharraf

The army has often played a prominent role in the governance of Pakistan as democracy has not been tailored to its environment,:crazy: former president Pervez Musharraf said. "I think the war hysteria that is being created in India, I repeat, India, not in Pakistan, is an issue," he said.
yeah..True..the environment is jihad and democracy sounds funny in such a place.

People of Pakistan massively run towards the Army, Musharraf said
If he were in power, he would have "counter-threatened" India following the surgical strikes in PoK:pound:


The United States has used Pakistan at its convenience and ditched it, said Musharraf

Everyone ditches the bitch(pak) who snitch.


WASHINGTON: The army has often played a prominent role in the governance of Pakistan as democracy has not been tailored to its environment, the country's former president Pervez Musharraf has said.
"Army has always had a role since our independence. It has played a very prominent role in the governance of Pakistan, mainly because of misgovernance by all the so-called democratically-elected governments,"
pak army hates competition in looting paki people.

Musharraf said in an interview at the Washington Ideas Forum here on Thursday.

He said the "inherent weakness" of Pakistan is that democracy in the country has not been tailored in accordance with the dictates of the environment. "There are no checks and balances within the system. The constitution doesn't provide those checks and balances."
Yeah...pak has no idea about its millions in population+isnt that the pak army always wanted to loot.


"Therefore, the military is forced and pulled, sucked into the political environment, especially when misgovernance is going on and Pakistan is going down in all socio-economic indicators. The public and the people massively run towards the army chief, and that is how the army gets involved," Musharraf said, justifying the frequent military coups in the country.
He said this was the reason for Pakistan having military governments and the army enjoying high stature.
"The people of Pakistan love the army and demand a lot from it. So I'm very proud of the fact that army has backed me because I've been with them for over 40 years. I fought wars with them, I've fought two wars and I've fought a number of actions with them. So I know they are my constituency," he said in response to a question.
"So, therefore, we have to maybe tailor the political structure in accordance with the dictates of Pakistan, introduce checks and balances so that misgovernance does not take place and the army does not have to come into politics," Musharraf said.
He also alleged that the United States has used his country at its convenience and ditched it.
Musharraf said he has plans to return to his country. "I know that the trial is all politicized. One has to face it. And no risk, no gain, as they say," he said, adding that he would not go back if the government in Pakistan was performing well.
"I have no such ambition of going back and ruling again. I just want people to run Pakistan well because Pakistan is my passion," he said.
:rofl:

However, the former president put forth conditions for his return.
:rofl:
This guy is contradicting himself...

"I'm not that foolhardy. So, therefore, I would like to see the correct environment where a political change, the third political force is a possibility. I would like to see that the cases are to a degree at a level where my movements are not restricted, the cases can continue, I'll face them," he said.
"I want my movement not to be restricted because I realize that unless I lead from the front, I wouldn't be able to generate the public support that I would require to create the third front," he argued.
Claiming that he did not know that Osama bin Laden was living in Pakistan, Musharraf objected to his hideout being called a palace. Constructing a wall outside one home, he said, is a "normal thing" in that part of his country, so bin Laden living in a house fenced with a high wall was nothing that could have been thought of as unusual.
paki mil. doesnt know who is living next door to its mil. compound?!! :pound:
No wonder paki mil. didnt know about Indian Surgical strikes Post URI!!


Musharraf said he had doubts whether bin Laden had indeed lived at his Abbottabad house for five years.
"Maybe he was going and coming, I still believe that. And if he was there in one of the -- in one of the public gatherings where I was being grilled on this aspect

, I finally said that the man living for five years in one room with three wives and 18 children, I think he must have rang up CIA himself and declared that he's there," he said, drawing laughter from the audience.
That must explain the 18 children.


Musharraf also said that if he were in power, he would be "counter-threatening" India in the wake of the recent surgical strikes in Pakistan-occupied Kashmir.
:pound: and paki army says theres NO surgical strikes..

"...they are threatening us that they are going to strike us at the time and place of their choosing. Now, this has been said by nobody less than Prime Minister, defence minister and the director general of military operations. This is a very serious matter," he said.
So..pak is worried.

"I think the war hysteria that is being created in India, I repeat, India, not in Pakistan, is an issue. They do that always. This is not the only time. Every time they do that," Musharraf said.
Source>>

and we have the paki establishment..terrorist spokespersons of paki establishment, paki exminsters in exile all talking about paki nukes against India.
 

ezsasa

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he was the worst president in history of pak.
Yet, he is the only paki leader who kept his word on not allowing terrorist to wage war from paki soil. Only to be broken by Mumbai attacks by his successor.

After all he was born here, Kuch tho Faraz ban tha hai na.
 

LordOfTheUnderworlds

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he was the worst president in history of pak.
Not better or worse than any other Pak army chief. They are all pompous narcissistic dickheads. You are saying this about Musharraf because he is Mohajir and you probably Punjabi or Pashtoon. Many Pakistanis still adore him and want him to come back and save the nation. But no matter how much he tries to prove his Pakistaniyat, for you he will still be a Mohajir
 
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LordOfTheUnderworlds

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Possibility of open coup is negligible because of Kerry Lugar act. It will have to be done through indirect means like Judicial coup announcing disqualification of Nawaz or a bomb below the stage when Nawaz and Shahbaz are sitting together, followed by interim/national government which is mix of army officers and some puppet elected faces.
But this is just speculation. Raheel Sharif has said previously that he does not want extension.
 

sorcerer

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Pakistan Army Sets Timer Device On Nawaz Sharif Government

New Delhi: The Pakistan Army elite has sounded the warning bell for the beleaguered Nawaz Sharif government. At the Corps Commanders meeting on 14th October, the animosity towards the Prime Minister and his team was evident.

The terse statement that came out made it clear that that the powerful `corner-plot-walas` blame the PMO for the leak to Dawn.

They said that the article is a breach of national security and termed Cyril Almeida`s information as "false and fabricated."

However, they did not clarify why a false and fabricated story could endanger national security.
The Army gave the Sharif government five days to find out the source that `fed` the information to Almeida about the crucial October 3rd meeting.

Almeida`s report had minute details and it was later backed by the editor of Dawn who said that the facts were checked and rechecked. During the five days that the Sharif government had to come up with a plausible explanation, the PMO bungled by first putting Almeida on the Exit Control List and then withdrawing it.

It fielded Interior Minister Chaudhury Nisar to awkwardly explain its stand.

Meanwhile, almost the entire international public opinion favoured Almeida and press freedom.
Whoever planted the information on Dawn wanted it to appear that Nawaz Sharif and his brother Shahbaz Sharif, the Chief Minister of Punjab province, were knights in shining armour wanting to put terrorists behind bars but it was the Army that was preventing it:pound:.

As one journalist on a TV show said, "Inki capacity Chotu gang ko pakadne kii hai nahi, yeh kahaan sey Jaish ko pakdenge? Gullu Butt they couldn`t catch who had one gun, they had to call the Army."
The reference is to small time gangsters, who are unafraid of the civilian governments in Pakistan. The insinuation was that it was preposterous suggestion in the Almeida report that Shahbaz Sharif had the gumption to have said what he did about the army protecting terrorists who Nawaz and Shahbaz wanted to crackdown on.

But TV commentators in Pakistan are now deducing that what actually happened was that after the success of Zarb-e-Azb, the military offensive against the Taliban in North Waziristan, and similar crackdown in Sindh, the Army was keen to move into the Punjab province.


The Sharif brothers have been in-charge in the province for seven to eight years. This region is crawling with `non-state actors` and has brought infamy to Pakistan.


A Seek and Destroy operation in Punjab would bring laurels to whoever undertakes the mission. If Pakistan Army Chief General Raheel Sharif was planning to launch this soon, clearly he had no plans to leave the mission in two months for somebody else to handle. The elaborate public relations campaign to boost the Army Chief`s image did not indicate that Sharif would go anytime soon.

Also, Nawaz Sharif is over anxious on choosing his man as the next Chief of Army Staff.
That has always been a thing with Nawaz. He messed up in choosing Pervez Musharraf. He would want an Army Chief, who stays in the barracks and is not seen as the `Upholder of National Prestige`.

Nawaz Sharif`s family is under the Panama leaks cloud. The family believes that the continuous leaks originate from GHQ.
In Pakistan, everything is a conspiracy. Then there is Imran Khan threatening a massive dharna from 30th October. He has said that anybody but Sharif is acceptable to him. That has led to rumours whether Shahbaz Sharif is a contender as he is the only senior family member whose name doesn`t figure in Panama papers.

But not to be outdone, there are those who say Shahbaz`s mother-in-law figures in the list and that is being touted by some elements in the media cell close to the PMO.
Wheels within wheels. Islamabad is now bracing itself for the inevitable. There was a gossamer coup of 2014 where Raheel Sharif took charge of foreign policy and security matters but left the rest to Nawaz.

But now the distance between PMO and GHQ is too vast to be bridged.

Raheel Sharif retires on 30th November and speculations were rife whether he would get an extension or fade away into the sunset.
But the fact is that a General is a General till the day he superannuates. Especially so in Pakistan. Nawaz Sharif probably miscalculated that Raheel was a lame duck. If anything Raheel is now a wounded tiger, a dangerous beast.
While the print media in Pakistan is still leaning on supporting Dawn and by and large supports the elected government, television studios and the Urdu media have started the migration towards the Army.

Talking heads have begun laying the blame for Pakistan`s isolation in the world to Nawaz Sharif. Bilawal Bhutto`s slogan "Modi ka jo yaar hai, gaddar hai gaddar hai" is played on almost all channels, though Bilawal has tried to distance himself from the slogan off late.

Long time journalists now question why Nawaz Sharif did not speak at the UN about the capture of Kulbhushan Yadav, a RAW operative who is said to have admitted working to destabilise India.
One expert even offered a cash award if anybody could get Sharif to mention Kulbhushan Yadav`s name. So, in addition to being anti-army Sharif is blamed of being pro-India. A lethal combination for any Prime Minister of Pakistan.

The word is out in corridors of power and the marketplace that Nawaz Sharif`s days are numbered. But Sharif still might have some aces up his sleeve. He is a long time player of the military versus government game.
Source>>
 

sorcerer

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After Dawn: The Civil-Military Chasm Deepens in Pakistan

On October 6, Cyril Almeida, a senior Pakistani journalist, published an article in the English-language daily Dawn entitled “Act against militants or face international isolation, civilians tell military.” The article narrated an intense scene of heated debate between the country’s top civil and military leaders, held a few days ago.


So far, the Pakistani government has rejected the story three times by calling it “amalgamation of fiction and fabrication.” In addition to its rejections, the government has put Almeida’s name on the Exit Control List (ECL), barring him from foreign travel. Dawn, meanwhile, continues to defend the story by arguing that the published material was fact-checked and crosschecked with multiple sources to ensure its credibility.


The vivid details reported in the story reflect a deepening division between the civil and military leadership that has further grown aggravated in the wake of the Kashmir crisis and growing international pressure on Pakistan for its inability to take on all terrorists after the Uri attacks.


Moreover, the reported content in Dawn’s story and other events that have unfolded in the last few weeks also highlight the Pakistani civilian government’s efforts to push back against the military to gain some space in the country’s defense policy and foreign affairs.

The story further points towards some of the military’s policies that run parallel to the civilian government:

Addressing Gen Akhtar, the younger Sharif [Prime Miniser Nawaz Sharif’s brother, who is also the chief minister of Punjab province] complained that whenever action has been taken against certain groups by civilian authorities, the security establishment has worked behind the scenes to set the arrested free. Astounded onlookers describe a stunned room that was immediately aware of the extraordinary, unprecedented nature of the exchange,” the Dawn report said. Meanwhile, a week ago, during a meeting of the National Assembly Standing Committee on Foreign Affairs, a lawmaker from the ruling party, demanded action against non-state actors, especially the chief of Jamaat-ud-Dawa (JuD), Hafiz Saeed. The lawmaker questioned the logic behind inaction against Saeed: “Which eggs is Hafiz Saeed laying for us that we are nurturing him?

Apparently, the government’s push has been the result of a growing internal and external pressure that has questioned Prime Minister Nawaz Sharif’s control over his government. The government’s cautious demand — some might call it an expression of frustration — of the military to gain consensus on some of the country’s security policies may not have been the result of India’s recently declared policy to isolate Pakistan internationally, but due to the steadily building pressure from Pakistan’s closet ally, China, which has questioned Pakistan’s logic behind putting a technical hold on India’s move to ban Jaish-e-Mohammad (JeM) chief Masood Azhar at the United Nations (UN).

According to Dawn, the prime minister has instructed the Inter Services Intelligence (ISI) chief that “fresh attempts be made to conclude the Pathankot investigation and restart the stalled Mumbai attacks-related trials in a Rawalpindi antiterrorism court.” However, it’s unlikely that in the coming days and weeks there will be any credible action against India-focused militant groups. In fact, it’s already clear where the fallout of the civilian government’s push against the military is likely to go: the government’s multiple denials of Dawn’s report and a travel ban on the story’s author are not moves made by the Sharif’s government independently; rather, the reaction from the government suggests the military pushing the civilian government to do its biding.

The message here is clear: the establishment may have tolerated the government’s questioning behind closed doors, but it has neither appreciated nor approved the disclosure of details that perhaps, according to the former, undermine its position and control. Since Dawn’s report became public, the international media has been trying to read into the story, which has clearly annoyed the military establishment. For the military, the government’s demand of “non-interference” in civilian law enforcement agencies work and action against certain militant groups means giving in to New Delhi’s pressure regardless of domestic implications. The policy highlights the military’s long-held strategic position of not acting against certain militant groups, even at the cost of internal security.

On the other hand, the government’s repeated attempts to reject Dawn’s story also reflect its weakened position vis-a-vis the military, where the government has been forced into taking swift action against the author of the report — a move that is by all means unjustified.

Caught in the crosshairs is the country’s media, that has been made a scapegoat in this latest phase of the power struggle between Pakistan’s military and civilian forces. Apparently, the government’s attempt at asserting control over the military has been rolled back by the latter before it could even begin. The ISI chief’s multiple refusals to attend the Senate Committee’s scheduled meetings to address the recent India-Pakistan situation and Almeida’s addition to the ECL by the government is an addition to a long list of forced surrenders by the civilians before the military.

Over the course of the next few weeks, the fate of the civilian government will become clear. Rest assured: Pakistan’s selective counterterrorism policy is here to stay, with banned organizations continuing to openly plan rallies across the country while sane voices like Almeida are shut down and targeted.

http://thediplomat.com/2016/10/after-dawn-the-civil-military-chasm-deepens-in-pakistan/
 

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