Falling Short: Indigenous content of major Indian aerospace products

Wisemarko

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An eye opener article:
India’s armed forces are faced with the reality of a still-nascent domestic aerospace and defence industry that is struggling to deliver top-shelf equipment. Meanwhile, onerous transfer of technology requirements and local manufacturing demands associated with foreign aircraft and weapon purchases have often increased procurement costs without delivering any long term benefits.

According to figures released by India’s Ministry of Defence (MoD) in July 2022, indigenous content levels on

1. Tejas Mk1/Mk1A fighter (slightly more than 53%),

2. Dhruv utility helicopter (almost 56%),

3. Light Combat Helicopter (54%) and

4. Light Utility Helicopter (52%).

5. Sukhoi Su-30MKI fighter
51%

6. Dornier 228 light transport 44%


“The great pitfall with relying on indigenous platforms is that most of the value goes to foreign contractors, who then have total control over exports and production,”
says AeroDynamic Advisory managing director Richard Aboulafia.

“The alternative is to create vertically-integrated national systems, which guarantee systems mediocrity and final result mediocrity. There’s a reason Tejas isn’t powered by the [indigenous] Kaveri engine,” Aboulafia notes.
 

Arpuster

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An eye opener article:
India’s armed forces are faced with the reality of a still-nascent domestic aerospace and defence industry that is struggling to deliver top-shelf equipment. Meanwhile, onerous transfer of technology requirements and local manufacturing demands associated with foreign aircraft and weapon purchases have often increased procurement costs without delivering any long term benefits.

According to figures released by India’s Ministry of Defence (MoD) in July 2022, indigenous content levels on

1. Tejas Mk1/Mk1A fighter (slightly more than 53%),

2. Dhruv utility helicopter (almost 56%),

3. Light Combat Helicopter (54%) and

4. Light Utility Helicopter (52%).

5. Sukhoi Su-30MKI fighter
51%

6. Dornier 228 light transport 44%


“The great pitfall with relying on indigenous platforms is that most of the value goes to foreign contractors, who then have total control over exports and production,”
says AeroDynamic Advisory managing director Richard Aboulafia.

“The alternative is to create vertically-integrated national systems, which guarantee systems mediocrity and final result mediocrity. There’s a reason Tejas isn’t powered by the [indigenous] Kaveri engine,” Aboulafia notes.
Thats a very wrong assertion. Whatever may be the indigenous content but the fact is that we have the control over IP and softwares codes. This implies that we are not dependent on anybody on how to use the platform. We can alwayz change the OEM of the imported contents and even replace them with indigenous content without needing permission of anybody. We can also integrate whatever weapons we like. We cannot be this independent even if a foreign product is produced here with higher level of localisation.
 

Wisemarko

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Thats a very wrong assertion. Whatever may be the indigenous content but the fact is that we have the control over IP and softwares codes. This implies that we are not dependent on anybody on how to use the platform. We can alwayz change the OEM of the imported contents and even replace them with indigenous content without needing permission of anybody. We can also integrate whatever weapons we like. We cannot be this independent even if a foreign product is produced here with higher level of localisation.
Yes you have to start somewhere.
 

NutCracker

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An eye opener article:
India’s armed forces are faced with the reality of a still-nascent domestic aerospace and defence industry that is struggling to deliver top-shelf equipment. Meanwhile, onerous transfer of technology requirements and local manufacturing demands associated with foreign aircraft and weapon purchases have often increased procurement costs without delivering any long term benefits.

According to figures released by India’s Ministry of Defence (MoD) in July 2022, indigenous content levels on

1. Tejas Mk1/Mk1A fighter (slightly more than 53%),

2. Dhruv utility helicopter (almost 56%),

3. Light Combat Helicopter (54%) and

4. Light Utility Helicopter (52%).

5. Sukhoi Su-30MKI fighter
51%

6. Dornier 228 light transport 44%


“The great pitfall with relying on indigenous platforms is that most of the value goes to foreign contractors, who then have total control over exports and production,”
says AeroDynamic Advisory managing director Richard Aboulafia.

“The alternative is to create vertically-integrated national systems, which guarantee systems mediocrity and final result mediocrity. There’s a reason Tejas isn’t powered by the [indigenous] Kaveri engine,” Aboulafia notes.
HTSE-1200 will complete it's certification in 2025 , so Dhruv, LCH , LUH can achieve 70-75% percentage when next overhaul is due. Only rwr/ew might've been from Israel or Saab.
 

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