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Assassin 2.0

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In 1996 Chinese launched tried to launch this American satellite intelsat.
UsingLong March 3B but instead of going up it crashed in the nearby village and destruction was devastating and terrific but knowing how cruel ccp is first they rejected any deaths but and later claimed only 7 people died later they claimed 56 people died but in reality seeing the condition we can pretty much assume that thousands died.

1:49

Failure of March 3b is not important but this another Chinese clear portrayal about how Chinese propaganda works.
 

rockdog

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In 1996 Chinese launched tried to launch this American satellite intelsat.
UsingLong March 3B but instead of going up it crashed in the nearby village and destruction was devastating and terrific but knowing how cruel ccp is first they rejected any deaths but and later claimed only 7 people died later they claimed 56 people died but in reality seeing the condition we can pretty much assume that thousands died.

1:49

Failure of March 3b is not important but this another Chinese clear portrayal about how Chinese propaganda works.
View attachment 82395

The last GSLV mission (GSLV-D3) failed after the malfunctioning of indigenous cryogenic stage, dampening the country's hopes of joining the elite club of five nations with such capability.26 Dec 2010

25918_720w.jpg
 
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The last GSLV mission (GSLV-D3) failed after the malfunctioning of indigenous cryogenic stage, dampening the country's hopes of joining the elite club of five nations with such capability.26 Dec 2010
What's the point? He was stating about habit of hiding failures, the issue which doesn't seem to be with India.
It is obsolete news anyway, 4 years later in 2014, India had become the cryo country and vehicle has become mature with many launches since then too.
"ISRO on cloud nine as India joins "cryo club""

Has started to build even bigger launchers thereafter;
"'India masters rocket science': Here's why the new ISRO launch is special"





(Page 72 for launcher summary)
 

skywatcher

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Chang’e-5 reaches Lagrange point on extended mission

HELSINKI — A spacecraft involved in China’s 2020 lunar sample return mission has entered orbit around Sun-Earth Lagrange point 1 as part of an extended mission.

The Chang’e-5 orbiter successfully entered an intended orbit around the Lagrange point at 1:29 a.m. Eastern March 15, the China Aerospace Science and Technology Corp. (CASC), the spacecraft’s manufacturer, stated March 19.

The spacecraft will carry out a range of tests and solar observations under the control of the Beijing Aerospace Control Center (BACC). Possible future destinations for extended activities are being considered.

The extended Chang’e-5 mission is China’s first excursion to Sun-Earth L1 and first Chinese spacecraft to move inside the orbit of the Earth.

The orbiter in December facilitated the delivery to Earth of a reentry capsule containing collected lunar materials. It then utilized propellant saved through a highly-accurate launch and trans-lunar injection to embark on an additional journey.

Sun-Earth L1, located about 1.5 million kilometers from Earth, is one of a number of points near two large co-orbiting bodies at which gravitational and centrifugal forces are balanced, allowing spacecraft to maintain an orbit around with minimal station keeping.

NASA’s DSCOVR deep space climate observatory mission is one of a number of spacecraft to have utilized Sun-Earth Lagrange point 1. The location of the Lagrange point makes it suited to long term, unobstructed observations of the Earth and the Sun.

Chang’e-5 return, continuation
The Chang’e-5 orbiter was instrumental in the successful collection of lunar material from Oceanus Procellarum late last year.

The mission launched in late November and saw a lander spacecraft set down near Mons Rümker Dec. 1. Collected samples were delivered to the Chang’e-5 orbiter by an ascent vehicle following a robotic lunar orbit rendezvous and docking procedure.

The orbiter left lunar orbit Dec. 12 along with a return capsule containing lunar samples. The two spacecraft separated around 5,000 kilometers from Earth Dec 16., with the return capsule performing a ‘skip’ reentry into the atmosphere.

The return capsule landed at 12:59 Eastern Dec. 16 with 1.731 kilograms of lunar materials. The orbiter performed a maneuver to set it on a course for Sun-Earth L1.

Possible future scenarios for the Chang’e-5 orbiter could include visiting the Sun-Earth L4 or L5 points. These triangular libration points located 60 degrees ahead and behind Earth in its orbit are more stable than the other three points and could harbor near-Earth objects. Imagers could be used to survey the region for speculated Earth Trojan asteroid objects.

Potential visits of Venus or 469219 Kamoʻoalewa (2016 HO3), the stated target for China’s 2024 Zhenghe near-Earth asteroid sampling mission, are considered unlikely based on estimates of remaining propellant and required changes in velocity.

Lunar far side update
China’s ongoing Chang’e-4 lunar far side mission is meanwhile expected to complete its 28th lunar Day Saturday, March 20.

The January 2019 landing marked the first soft landing on the lunar far side, with communications facilitated by a relay satellite stationed in orbit around Earth-moon Lagrange point 2 beyond the moon.

The Chang’e-4 lander and Yutu-2 rover have been operating on the moon for over Earth 800 days. The solar-powered spacecraft enter a hibernation state for the intensely cold lunar nights.

The Yutu-2 rover has so far driven 652.62 meters across Von Kármán crater and is about 429 meters distant from the lander.

The mission has produced data on the local subsurface structure, potential detection of material derived from the lunar mantle, diverse rock types and secondary crater fragments encountered by the rover, first radiation dose measurements from the lunar surface and local impact histories.

China is next planning a number of Chang’e missions to the lunar south pole. These in concert with planned Russian missions are considered the starting point for a basic stage “International Lunar Research Station”, tentatively to be expanded into more permanent robotic facilities and potential crewed visits and long term stays.
 

smooth manifold

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A Long March 4C rocket launched Yaogao-31 Group 04 reconnaissance satellites from Jiuquan on 13 Mar 2021.
It is the 363 flight of Long March series.

Orbital launches from Chinese launch centers: 395
(Long March/Kuaizhou/Smart Dragon/Hyperbola/Ceres)
Jiuquan - 140
Xichang - 153
Taiyuan - 89
Wenchang - 11
Sea Launches- 2

Coming up next:
A Long March 4C rocket wll launch a Gaofen-12-02 Earth observation satellite from Jiuquan on XX March 2021.
A Long March 4C rocket launched a Gaofen-12-02 SAR satellite from Jiuquan on 31 March 2021.
It is the 364 flight of Long March series.

Mission insignia
00686eaKgy1gp2r7cmsiaj30u00u0gtp.jpg


Orbital launches from Chinese launch centers: 396
(Long March/Kuaizhou/Smart Dragon/Hyperbola/Ceres)
Jiuquan - 141
Xichang - 153
Taiyuan - 89
Wenchang - 11
Sea Launches- 2

Coming up next:
A Long March 6 rocket will launch Qilu-1/4 satellites from Taiyuan on XX April 2021.
 

skywatcher

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China’s Tianwen 1 mission targets mid-May landing on Mars
00686eaKgy1gpa5njg9agj30p00gowln.jpg


China’s Tianwen 1 spacecraft — in orbit around Mars since February — is scheduled to deploy a descent module to attempt the country’s first landing on the Red Planet in mid-May. Wang Chi, director of the National Space Science Center at the Chinese Academy of Sciences, said that Tianwen 1’s lander and rover are scheduled to touch down on Mars in May.

Since Feb. 10, the Tianwen 1 spacecraft has maneuvered into an orbit closer to Mars. The orbiter’s current path takes it as close as 174 miles (280 kilometers) and as far as 36,660 miles (59,000 kilometers) from Mars. Tianwen 1 completes one lap around the Red Planet every two days or so.

Tianwen 1’s lander and rover will target landing in a broad plain in the northern hemisphere of Mars called Utopia Planitia. If China pulls off that feat, it will make China the third country to perform a soft landing on Mars — after the Soviet Union and the United States — and the second country to drive a robotic rover on the Red Planet.
 

smooth manifold

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A Long March 4C rocket launched a Gaofen-12-02 SAR satellite from Jiuquan on 31 March 2021.
It is the 364 flight of Long March series.

Mission insignia
View attachment 83332

Orbital launches from Chinese launch centers: 396
(Long March/Kuaizhou/Smart Dragon/Hyperbola/Ceres)
Jiuquan - 141
Xichang - 153
Taiyuan - 89
Wenchang - 11
Sea Launches- 2

Coming up next:
A Long March 6 rocket will launch Qilu-1/4 satellites from Taiyuan on XX April 2021.
A Long March 4B rocket launched a Shiyan-6-03 satellite from Taiyuan on 9 April 2021.
It is the 365 flight of Long March series.


Mission insignia
00686eaKgy1gpd530xc6aj30k30r3tlu.jpg


Orbital launches from Chinese launch centers: 397
(Long March/Kuaizhou/Smart Dragon/Hyperbola/Ceres)
Jiuquan - 141
Xichang - 153
Taiyuan - 90
Wenchang - 11
Sea Launch- 2

Coming up next:
A Long March 4C rocket will launch XX satellites from Jiuquan on 1X April 2021.
 

skywatcher

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China begins construction of its fifth rocket launch site

BEIJING (Reuters) - A port city in eastern China has launched an ambitious plan to build the country’s fifth rocket launch site, under a longer-term goal to ramp up space infrastructure to meet the demands of an expected boom in commercial missions.

An engineering company in eastern Zhejiang province won a tender on April 1 to construct the launch pad in Ningbo city, as well as a section of the command centre and an assembly and testing facility, according to a document posted on the website of the Ningbo Free Trade Zone.

As part of the Zhejiang government’s infrastructure plans for 2021-2025, Ningbo will invest 20 billion yuan ($3 billion) in a rocket launch centre in the county of Xiangshan.

In the next five to 10 years, China envisions massive constellations of commercial satellites that can offer services ranging from high-speed internet for aircraft to tracking coal shipments.

China currently has four launch sites - three inland and one on the southern island of Hainan.

China launched 39 missions in 2020, including an unmanned probe to Mars, and is expected to see more than 40 launches this year, according to state media.
 

skywatcher

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China preparing Tianzhou-2 cargo mission to follow upcoming space station launch

HELSINKI — A Long March 7 rocket has arrived at China’s coastal Wenchang spaceport to facilitate the Tianzhou-2 supply mission to a soon-to-launch space station module.

The delivery was announced by the China Manned Space Engineering Office Monday and is part of intense preparations for construction of a modular space station in low Earth orbit.

China is currently readying a Long March 5B rocket to launch Tianhe, aroughly 22-metric-ton spacecraft which will serve as the core space station module. That mission is expected to launch in late April.

The recently delivered Long March 7 kerosene-liquid oxygen propellant medium-lift rocket will be assembled to launch the Tianzhou-2 cargo and supply spacecraft to dock with the core module.

The Tianzhou-2 mission will provide Tianhe with propellant for maintaining its orbital altitude as well as supplies for hosting astronauts. The cargo spacecraft will have a mass of around 13,000 at liftoff, with a cargo mass of around 6,500 kilograms.

The Shenzhou-12 mission, launching on a Long March 2F rocket from Jiuquan, will subsequently send three astronauts for the Tianhe core module.

Chinese space authorities have not revealed a detailed timeline for the upcoming missions. However previous launch campaigns for the Long March 5B and Long March 7 rockets indicate the Tianhe launch is likely to take place near the end of April, with the Tianzhou-2 mission ready to go by mid-May. Shenzhou-12 could launch as soon as June.

The Long March 5B to launch the core module will be rolled out to the launch pad around a week ahead of launch. The Long March 7 will roll out to a different pad at Wenchang around 5 days before its later launch.

China is aiming to construct its three-module space station with 11 launches across 2021-2022. These will consist of three module launches and visits by four crewed missions and four cargo spacecraft. Chinese astronauts are currently in training for space station missions, with 12 astronauts expected to fly on the four missions.

A Long March 2F rocket is also to be on standby at Jiuquan to perform emergency rescue missions to the space station, a senior space official stated in March.

The three-module, 66-metric-ton space station will host three astronauts for six month rotations. Planned experiments include international projects in the areas of astronomy, space medicine, space life science, biotechnology, microgravity fluid physics, microgravity combustion and space technologies.

The outpost will orbit at between 340-450 kilometers for at least 10 years. Orbital inclination will be around 43 degrees to allow crewed launches to the station from Jiuquan in the Gobi Desert. The station could potentially be expanded to six modules, using apparent backup modules.
 

skywatcher

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China to launch a pair of spacecraft towards the edge of the solar system in 2024

HELSINKI — China is developing a mission to send a pair of spacecraft to study the far reaches of the solar system and reach interstellar space by mid-century.

The project aims to send separate spacecraft to the nose and tail of the heliosphere, a region of space dominated by solar wind created by our Sun, to study distinct areas of this bubble and how it interacts with the interstellar medium.

Wu Weiren, a senior figure in China’s lunar exploration project, told official industry newspaper China Space News Friday that scientists are working on an implementation plan for the mission.

Wu says the mission aims to reach 100 astronomical units—one AU is equivalent to one Sun-Earth distance, or 150 million kilometers—from Earth by 2049, when the People’s Republic of China celebrates the centenary of its founding.

An overview of the proposed mission presented to the European Planetary Science Congress in 2019 indicates the Chinese heliosphere probes would launch in 2024. The first would make a flyby of Jupiter in 2029 before heading to the nose of the heliosphere.

The second probe would make a flyby of Jupiter in 2033 before a flyby of ice giant Neptune in 2038. The spacecraft could also potentially release a small impactor probe shortly before arrival, with the main probe observing the interaction with the Neptunian atmosphere.

The project somewhat echoes NASA’s Voyager missions but the probes’ intermediate targets are constrained by current relative positions of the planets. The Voyagers made use of a rare planetary alignment to visit all four outer planets. Voyager 1 and 2 are now 22.7 and 18.9 billion kilometers (152 and 126 AU) away from Earth respectively.

For the Chinese probes more science focus is therefore on the heliosphere and interstellar medium, including studying phenomena such as Anomalous Cosmic Rays and the “hydrogen wall,” at the boundary of the solar system and interstellar space.

The Chinese heliosphere probes will take advantage of advances in propulsion and ground station and deep space communications made in recent years by China’s space industry. Such progress has recently facilitated missions to Mars, a lunar sample return and a planned mission to Jupiter.

The mission profile above was understood to still be under development. A workshop hosted by the International Space Science Institute in Beijing in late 2019 explored the mission trade space and presented possibilities including a flyby of Kuiper Belt Object Quaoar and its small moon Weywot. The workshop also used the name “Interstellar Express” for the proposed Chinese mission.

A 2019 paper on “Exploring the solar system boundary” published in Scientia Sinica by Wu and other high profile Chinese scientists in space exploration provides insight into probable launch and spacecraft design.

The spacecraft will be powered by radioisotope thermoelectric generators (RTGs) with a science payload mass of greater than 50 kilograms. Long March 3B and larger Long March 5 rockets are under consideration for launch, depending on which propulsion systems—dual-mode chemical propulsion systems or monopropellant and ion-electric propulsion—are selected.

The two 2024 Chinese missions would become the sixth and seventh spacecraft to achieve solar system escape velocity, following NASA’s Pioneer 10 and 11, Voyagers 1 and 2, and New Horizons.
 

SexyChineseLady

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Wow!!!

China is developing plans for a 13,000-satellite megaconstellation

This is to set up a space-based internet!


"HELSINKI — China is to oversee the construction and operation of a national satellite internet megaconstellation through coordinating the country’s major space actors.

Recent comments by senior officials indicate that plans are moving ahead to alter earlier constellation plans by space sector state-owned enterprises and possibly make these part of a larger “Guowang” or “national network” satellite internet project.

Spectrum allocation filings submitted to the International Telecommunication Union (ITU) by China in September last year revealed plans to construct two similarly named “GW” low Earth orbit constellations totaling 12,992 satellites. "
 

skywatcher

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China to launch its own Hubble-class space telescope

China could launch the first module for its own space station this month as the country also prepares to send a large space telescope to join it in orbit.

The Chinese Space Station Telescope (CSST), which is set to launch in 2024, will operate as a space optical observatory for Chinese scientists to carry out sky surveys, according to Xinhua. The telescope, sometimes called "Xuntian," which literally translates to "survey the heavens," will have an impressive 6.6-foot (2 meters) diameter lens, making it comparable to the Hubble Telescope Scope. However, it boasts a field of view 300 times greater than that of 31-year-old Hubble while retaining a similar resolution.

The wide field of view will allow the telescope to observe up to 40 percent of the sky over ten years using a huge 2.5 billion pixel camera. Notably, the telescope will co-orbit Earth along with the Chinese space station and will be able to periodically dock with the future crewed outpost.

"The telescope will be set up in an optical module that can fly independently in orbit for a higher efficiency of space probe," Zhou Jianping, chief designer of China's human spaceflight program, told China Central Television in March.

"Meanwhile, we will make it fly approximately in common orbit with the future space station. This will help us refuel the telescope and carry out in-orbit upgrade for it, so as to always keep it on the level of an international frontier," Jianping added.

This could be a big advantage for the CSST, as Hubble required a number of missions to repair, upgrade and replace a variety of components and systems.

Meanwhile, on the ground, four astronomy research centers are being built across China to work with data from the space telescope, Xinhua reported last year.

The CSST will observe near ultraviolet and visible light. Notable cosmological and astronomical objectives include investigating the properties of dark matter and dark energy, the large-scale structure of the cosmos and galaxy formation and evolution, according to a 2019 paper from members of the National Astronomical Observatories (NAOC) under the Chinese Academy of Sciences.

The CSST will also be expected to make contributions to detecting and surveying trans-Neptunian objects (TNOs) and near-Earth asteroids.

Additionally, in preparation for the nation's new space station, Chinese astronauts are currently undergoing intense training for the first crewed missions to construct the future station.

China is preparing for 11 launches across 2021 and 2022, including four crewed missions, for the construction phase of the project. The core module, named "Tianhe," meaning "Harmony of the Heavens," is expected to launch from Wenchang in April, based on previous Long March 5 preparations.
 

skywatcher

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Core module launch date confirmed: 29 Apr 2021
View attachment 83511
Schedule for the construction of Chinese Space Station:
2021.04.29: CZ-5B Y2 launch Tianhe core module;
2021.05.20: CZ-7 Y3 launch Tianzhou II;
2021.06.10: CZ-2F/G Y12 launches Shenzhou XII
2021.09: Shenzhou XII returns, CZ-7 Y4 launch Tianzhou III;
2021.10: CZ-2F/G Y13 launch Shenzhou XIII;
2022.03: Shenzhou XIII returns;
2022.03-04: CZ-7 Y5 Launch Tianzhou IV;
2022.04: Verification of critical technology of the space station;
2022.05: CZ-2F/G Y14 launch Shenzhou XIV;
2022.05-06: CZ-5B Y3 Launch Wentian Laboratory Module;
2022.08-09: CZ-5B Y4 Launch Mentian Laboratory Module;
2022.10: CZ-7 Y6 launch of Tianzhou V;
2022.11: CZ-2F/G Y15 launch Shenzhou XV
 

skywatcher

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China's most powerful rocket Long March 5B rolled out today for April 29 mission.
9da82ba5gy1gptdffg7x7j21ha0u047y.jpg

9da82ba5gy1gptdj0qm53j21ha0u045x.jpg
 

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