Barbaric Paper Dragon People's Republic of China: Idiotic Musings.

Hari Sud

Senior Member
Joined
Mar 31, 2012
Messages
3,771
Likes
8,490
Country flag
China wields a blunt power weapon with dubious claims.

Economically and militarily, China falls short of expectations. Despite projecting strength through an $18 trillion export-oriented economy, they conveniently omit the substantial burden of an equivalent debt, both internal and external. This considerable debt looms over their economy, contributing to their current challenges. On the military front, China boasts a formidable coastal navy, yet their sailors and admirals lack experience beyond their shores. Their 1.8 million-strong army, armed with reverse-engineered rockets and missiles, has not engaged in significant action since the 1979 Vietnam War defeat, except for minor skirmishes in the Himalayas, hence are untrustworthy.

In essence, Chinese power emerges as a blunt weapon, effective for regional intimidation but ill-suited for combat against an equally competent adversary. This limitation becomes evident in their inability to seize Taiwan over the past seven decades or to advance further and capture Indian territories in the Himalayas. Previous territorial gains were achieved through stealth, where a friendly facade concealed their true intentions.

Recently, Moody's downgraded China's credit rating from stable to negative due to the alarming accumulation of debt in Chinese cities and provinces, reaching a staggering $11 trillion. The high-speed railways, once considered shining examples of progress, are burdened with a trillion-dollar debt, exacerbated by the underwhelming success of the high-speed rail network. The same debt-ridden narrative echoes in the housing sector, where hastily constructed, poor-quality properties in ghost cities find no buyers, leaving those who invested during construction unable to complete their purchases. This unsettling pattern repeats across various sectors, casting a shadow on China's economic stability.

Despite China's status as the second-largest economy, it cannot boast about its economic resilience, as it heavily relies on exports. Manufacturing, a significant economic driver, is gradually leaving China, signaling the potential erosion of its manufacturing prowess in the near future.

The dubious nature of China's military prowess is evident, facing formidable challenges in the South China Sea, the Pacific, and the Himalayas. The technologically advanced United States poses a significant obstacle, denying China the ability to assert control over Taiwan or other sea areas in the Asia-Pacific region. The U.S. has strategically fortified Taiwan into a military power and established its presence in Guam, the Philippines, and around Japan, creating a credible threat to China's ambitions.

In summary, the United States relies on a deterrence policy encompassing punishment and denial. The threat of punishment involves the destruction of an adversary's infrastructure, while denial seeks to convince opponents that their military objectives are unattainable. Consequently, China emerges as a blunt weapon primarily suitable for intimidation, lacking the nuanced capabilities required to navigate complex geopolitical challenges successfully.
 

Hari Sud

Senior Member
Joined
Mar 31, 2012
Messages
3,771
Likes
8,490
Country flag
An extract from a paper published recently….. reference below.

China and its Aircraft carriers

There are four basic requirements for a CBG (Carrier Battle Group) to be used in a genuinely offensive role (in addition to compliments of support ships and submarines), which I call QUAD (I coined this term in 1981);
• Dedicated Carrier Borne AEW/AWACS.
• Dedicated Air-to-Air Refuelling Capability.
• On board Strike aircraft with sufficient Radius of Action and weapon load.
• Airborne Surveillance Aircraft for Submarine Detection.
Chinese CBGs do not have any of the above. Hence, to project Chinese CBGs as a threat in the Indian Ocean region (IOR) is akin to daydreaming. From the east coast of China (say Shanghai), the distance to the Bay of Bengal (Andamans, for example) will be around 3800 km.


China lacks the logistic capability to support a CBG at such a distance. After entering the Straits of Malacca, CBG will be vulnerable to Su-30s and P8i in addition to our own CBG if it succeeds. Will China take that risk? Extremely unlikely!

 

Tshering22

Sikkimese Saber
Senior Member
Joined
Aug 20, 2010
Messages
7,869
Likes
23,236
Country flag
Looks like the name of this thread fits the PLA too. And I am not saying this, Palki's source, a former PLAN colonel reveals it.

The propaganda that PLA soldiers and sailors could order food anywhere via their PLA-version of Swiggy or Zomato was all bogus (as we speculated back then when the first video was released in 2021).

Watch this and enjoy.

 

Johny_Baba

अज्ञानी
Senior Member
Joined
May 21, 2016
Messages
3,814
Likes
19,537
Country flag
There is a video circulating in west, where a certain pianist playing in public got interrupted by CCP guys as they were against getting filmed, they tried to stop his performance as well as "asking" others to stop recording - but the response to it was rather people "noticing" them further
some reverse search on internet and those CCP guys got busted very easily
1706082418503.png
 

Latest Replies

Global Defence

New threads

Articles

Top