Indian Ocean Developments

Discussion in 'Subcontinent & Central Asia' started by S.A.T.A, Jun 5, 2009.

  1. kalkibhagwan

    kalkibhagwan Tihar Jail Banned

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    lets do the same in china and china sea
     
  2. LETHALFORCE

    LETHALFORCE Moderator Moderator

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  3. LETHALFORCE

    LETHALFORCE Moderator Moderator

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  4. LETHALFORCE

    LETHALFORCE Moderator Moderator

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    A vision for the Indian Ocean

    The Hindu : Opinion / Lead : A vision for the Indian Ocean

    Recent developments in the Indian Ocean region demand attention. Look at a sample collection: Somali pirates, operating in waters off the Horn of Africa with impunity, are now coming closer to our coast; China has commissioned its first aircraft carrier; an Indian company's hydrocarbon exploration activity in Vietnam's waters is being contested by China; a former Japanese Prime Minister visiting Delhi calls for closer cooperation among “maritime democracies,” and every move by Beijing to cement its ties with our immediate neighbours is seen as vindication of the “string of pearls” theory.

    INDIA'S ‘SEA-BLINDNESS?'

    These developments may seem baffling to northern India's land-centric view. Here, the combined legacy of Alexander and subsequent invaders who crossed the Himalayas is far more important than the rich history of the subcontinent's interaction, through the ocean route, with a vast region stretching from Aden to Bali. While a majority of people in the north have never seen a beach, people living south of the Vindhyas, especially in the southern States and on the east and west coasts, regard the Indian Ocean as a defining element of their destiny.

    Having experienced India's centrality in the Indian Ocean region through visits to the Cape of Good Hope, Durban and Mombasa; Port Louis, Colombo and Gan — the southernmost island of Maldives; cities on Myanmar's southwestern flank and the coasts of Java and Bali, I am convinced that there can be no place for “sea-blindness” in our policymaking. Considerable scope, however, exists for developing a holistic approach if India wishes to cope with the challenges of the 21st century.

    In order to fully appreciate the magnitude of our challenges, identifying recent trends in different subregions may be helpful.

    THE STAKES IN THE AREA

    In the western section of the Indian Ocean, three key developments, all negative from our viewpoint, are: piracy, terrorism, and the Chinese Navy's growing presence as part of the broader trend of China's expanding profile in Eastern and Southern Africa.

    Piracy has attracted much attention and action. The Indian Navy has deservedly received considerable appreciation for its role in ensuring countermeasures. However, the expert opinion is that, in view of the expanding arc of piracy, much more needs to be done — on land, sea and elsewhere. On land, i.e. in Somalia — the epicentre of forces that gave birth to piracy — the Africans themselves have to resolve the issues, with more assistance from richer and deeply concerned member-states of the U.N. Action on the sea, ensuring the safety of maritime transport on which depends trade and energy security of so many countries, has to be taken by legitimate stakeholders. Action ‘elsewhere' should include measures that effectively reduce the attractiveness and sustainability of piracy as a flourishing industry.

    Terrorism through the sea came knocking on India's doors on 26/11. Developments since then have augmented concern, not confidence. Experts worry about the security of our coastal cities, and offshore oil and gas installations. As regards Chinese activities in the Indian Ocean, they are no longer a subject of debate among think tanks. Governments have been factoring in the increased presence of the Chinese Navy. China's assertive approach in Africa contributed, at least partially, to renewed dynamism reflected in two India-Africa Forum Summits in three years.

    Regarding India's immediate periphery, two key trends are now obvious. On the one hand, India's endeavour to promote cooperative bilateralism has begun to show positive results. On the other, Beijing continues to be ultra active in deepening its relations with principal South Asian countries such as Sri Lanka, Bangladesh and Myanmar, besides Pakistan — all located in the Indian Ocean region. These countries are happy playing both the ‘China card' and the ‘India card' to leverage their gains, but they need to promote the interests of South Asia as a whole too. In the eastern theatre of the Indian Ocean, the situation is becoming progressively complex and dangerous as a result of reverberations of China's aggressiveness in the South China Sea. While piracy and terrorism are manageable there, the critical question facing the subregion is: will China and its immediate neighbours ranging from Japan to Thailand chart a pattern of relations marked by cooperation or conflict? India has obviously immense stakes in the answer, and in contributing to the region's collective hopes for peace and stability. Fortunately, this subregion has an elaborate ASEAN-centric institutional architecture for dialogue and cooperation. Much hope is placed on the capability of these institutions to deliver effective results.

    NEW DELHI'S APPROACH

    New Delhi's conception of a suitable politico-strategic environment in the Indian Ocean is fairly clear. India wants neither a new cold war nor domination of the region by a single country. South Block rejects the view that an outside power is needed as “a sea-balancer” for the area. It envisages a region where stability and cooperation prevail, marked by maritime security for all and a collective ability to deal with sources of non-traditional security threats. Besides, India is set to enhance its hard power and also deploy soft power assets to deepen its links with littoral states.

    In this context, several points are noteworthy. First, in the Indian Ocean's western region, India's effort has been to strengthen defence cooperation with island states — Mauritius, Madagascar and Seychelles, besides Maldives. This exercise, still in an early phase, could do with acceleration. Second, under the overall umbrella of the IBSA Dialogue Forum, cooperation among the navies of the three member-states — India, Brazil and South Africa — through joint exercises, training and strategising has been gaining momentum. The two previous trilateral exercises took place in Cape Town and Durban. The resultant synergy should guide these countries to engage other interested parties by holding more exercises on the eastern seaboard of Africa.

    Third, since the western segment of the Indian Ocean has limited institutional arrangements for dialogue and cooperation compared to the eastern theatre, many believe it is time to reinvigorate the Indian Ocean Rim Association for Regional Cooperation (IOR-ARC). Bold words were uttered by the Ministry of External Affairs at a seminar in Delhi in May. They need to be matched by action with India as chair of this underutilised organisation.

    Fourth, India's bilateral cooperation on strategic issues needs to be strengthened with seven countries in the eastern theatre — Myanmar, Indonesia, Singapore, Vietnam, South Korea, Japan and Australia. Some may term them a ‘potential necklace of diamonds.' However, the proposed cooperation among “maritime democracies” will merit consideration only if it is not a proxy for an anti-China alliance. For cementing collective endeavours to make the Indian Ocean and its periphery safe, India's preference should be to utilise the existing institutions, especially the East Asia Summit.

    THE WAY AHEAD

    Diplomacy can help a country achieve its goals when if it is backed by strength. This time-tested dictum and a dispassionate study of the strategic environment drive India to provide the necessary resources for the modernisation of the Indian Navy. Admiral Vishnu Prakash, a retired Navy Chief, has made a persuasive case for this viewpoint, in a recent policy paper by the National Maritime Foundation. He urges India to develop and articulate “a maritime vision for itself and the neighbourhood.” His wise conclusion is: “The time has come for India to craft a new balance of power equation in order to safeguard its core interests and values.”
     
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  5. SpArK

    SpArK SORCERER Senior Member

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    India to base anti-piracy patrol plane in Maldives

    India to base anti-piracy patrol plane in Maldives



    October 18, 2011






    India will base a Dornier maritime patrol aircraft in the Maldives from Wednesday to carry out surveillance of the Indian Ocean island nation's exclusive economic zone and also maintain an anti-piracy vigil in its waters. The Indian Navy plane will operate from Male and will stay there



    for three weeks, a navy spokesperson said here Tuesday.
    India has been sending a warship or a naval plane to perform security roles for Maldives in the last two years, with Somali pirates becoming active close to island nation.


    It has also gifted a fast attack craft to the Maldivian maritime forces. India serviced the craft and returned it to the Maldives.


    A Indian Navy ship also carries out hydrography surveys in Maldivian waters to aid navigation. Bharat Electronics Limited (BEL) has also set up a chain of coastal radars for the island nation, apart from training its personnel in operating the equipment.


    The assistance is provided by India as a goodwill gesture towards its neighbours in the Indian Ocean Region and is in consonance with what Defence Minister AK Antony told naval commanders during their conference last week.


    "The Indian Navy has been mandated to be a net security provider to the island nations in the Indian Ocean Region. We would like to assure our maritime neighbours about our unstinted support for their security and economic prosperity," Antony had said.


    Similar assistance is provided by India to Mauritius too, with a speedboat being gifted to the Mauritian maritime force by the Indian Navy. A coastal radar chain and automated identification system too have been set up by India in Mauritius for maritime surveillance of the island nation.


    Mauritius has also placed an order for an offshore patrol vessel with Kolkata-based defence shipyard Garden Reach Shipbuilders and Engineers.


    India has also gifted a fast attack craft to the Seychelles. It was involved in anti-piracy operations in the Indian Ocean a few months ago.




    India to base anti-piracy patrol plane in Maldives - Hindustan Times
     
  6. pmaitra

    pmaitra Moderator Moderator

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    Good that we are placing anti-piracy planes in Maldives. We can keep an eye on potential pirate boats and while we are at it, we can also keep an eye on PLAAN ships.

    Good decision. Inject more planes.
     
  7. utubekhiladi

    utubekhiladi The Preacher Elite Member

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  8. ace009

    ace009 Freakin' Fighter fan Elite Member

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    Why just one? Whould be 2-3 for round the clock surveillence.
     
  9. KS

    KS Bye bye DFI Veteran Member

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    Growing Chinese influence in Indian Ocean no threat:Lankan army chief

    DEHRA DUN: Visiting Sri Lankan army chief Lt Gen Jagath Jayasuriya today said though China's influence in the Indian Ocean is growing, it is not posing any threat to the Indian sub-continent.

    "There is no threat to any country in the Indian sub-continent from the growing influence of China in the waters of Indian Ocean. It is a wrong belief", Jayasuriya told reporters after reviewing the Passing Out Parade (POP) at the Indian Military Academy (IMA) here.

    Read more @ Growing Chinese influence in Indian Ocean no threat:Lankan army chief - The Times of India


    ---------------------------------------------------------------

    So according to the Chief, Chinese presence in Indian ocean is none of India's business......Sabaash.
     
  10. Yusuf

    Yusuf GUARDIAN Administrator

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    What does a navy guy from a small country with a few fast attack boats know about what is a threat!!

    Hope he gets a good lesson in it in Dehra Dun.
     
  11. mayfair

    mayfair Elite Member Elite Member

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    ^^ And so do we, for allowing buffoons to extoll the virtues of thinking with their plonkers, on our soil.
     
  12. Tshering22

    Tshering22 Sikkimese Saber Senior Member

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    Don't see what Lankan chief has to say any different. Always knew that they were a tiny bunch of ungrateful weirdos who should be treated and dealt with on par with Pakistan. They backstabbed us during 1971 war, and they will do that again. Because of their inferiority complex, they even attack innocent Tamil fishermen of our country while the spineless government does nothing.

    Our idle foreign policy office should understand that SL has got this new card of China to always play and hedge against us. Ever since this Rajapakse came in, he's been having this body language of "Give me so and so concession or else I will side with China". Well, I say it is about time when SL is actually allowed to get swallowed by Chinese. They will NEVER dare to host military bases against us in their country because in war time, SL would be also targeted by our warships if that were to happen.

    So what's the solution? Stop treating them like they are above us. We all saw what happened when Pakistan went clinging to China after OBL raid. Chinese were s apprehensive and anxious not to take the Pakistani hug, especially after the blame game started post Kashgar incident in China. The same will happen to SL as well.

    Then they will come running to us.

    Look on the other side. We neglected Burma for so many years when their former military rulers sidelined with China. However, after realizing what China is really, the junta started opening up to look for alternative options themselves. Hence they came to realization very rightly timed.

    SL and BD should be given the same treatment. They will only have 2 options:

    - Come around and open their eyes.

    - Get swamped and swallowed by Chinese economy.
     
  13. Illusive

    Illusive Senior Member Senior Member

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    Sri Lanka is just trying to use both China and India, they have seen what pakistans ties with US and now China has helped them militarily. But Sri Lanka is trying to play smart by using it geography to its advantage(IOR) and letting China build its port and many other investments.

    We may think that SL is getting close to China, thats what the impression they are trying to give us. But in reality even SL dont want too much chinese influence. They want to keep a balance between both China and India to its advantage. They'll keep on changing sides to their needs.

    In the middle of all this US will try to gain its influence. With help from India, US starting to look at Myanmar, which is good for short term.

    India like China has to use its economy to it advt to make them dependent on us. Everyone in SA is trying to be a player.
     
  14. agentperry

    agentperry Senior Member Senior Member

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    why will sri lanka sees anything wrong in chinese intervention in Indian ocean as a threat. the same nation gives them hell lot of weapons and support for troubling our tamil Indians leave aside lankan tamils. this will get a like by pakistani naval chief on fb.
    chinese presence threatens India's interest, ofcourse sri lanka and pakistan and may be bangladesh will support china' presence to counteract India's military might. may be just like what asean nations did to china by inviting India.

    utter policy failure of not allowing these countries to have their interests lies in our interests. bd and sri lanka are big disgrace on ifs
     
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  15. Virendra

    Virendra Moderator Moderator

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    Smaller powers love to play the bigger ones off against each other by courting all of them one by one.
    It helps lay the pressure off and gives them chips for bargain as well.
     
  16. Galaxy

    Galaxy Elite Member Elite Member

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    SLN chief Jayasuriya is either paid by CPC or is afraid of talking against China.
     
  17. amitkriit

    amitkriit Senior Member Senior Member

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    May be not for a midget like Sri Lanka, but for India it's a real threat. And we will become a treat to those who don't see any threat in the expanding influence of China in our region.
     
  18. amoy

    amoy Senior Member Senior Member

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    Tell me how / what India has done to get SL or BD into your pocket, other than mocking them as 'failed states' :wave: ? As I pointed out earlier your affinity and meddling with Tamils (LTTE) virtually cornered SL (Sihalese dominated)
    At least now war-smitten SL a peanut state is receiving billions of investment in infra and so on. What can India offer except bluffing or muscle flexing, all sticks no carrots? If thats the way India is trying to grab the leadership role in SA, then I hv to say China is always an alternative for SA states incl NP, SL, BD and even Bhutan. China is sure to expand her presence on the subcontinent in contrast to the big bully India.
     
  19. Yusuf

    Yusuf GUARDIAN Administrator

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    Ohimalaya, what have we done for BD? Well we created them and helped them get out of the clutches of tyranny of west Pak. In return we got. In return we have got nothing except illegal immigrants and terrorists gettin sanctuary there.

    We have over the years tried to help them, asked for passage through their country to reach our north east which would have got them good transit fees but they refused.

    With SL, well there again we have tried to help them. Gave them preferential trade, helped them during their fight with LTTE in return we got nothing. Their president is extra clever and will get hurt if he keeps such a course in his dealings with India.
     
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  20. amitkriit

    amitkriit Senior Member Senior Member

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    Sri Lankans are racist to the core, they learn in only one way, the Hard Way.
     
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