Two Sikh soldiers to guard Queen Elizabeth for first time

Singh

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Two Sikh soldiers to guard Queen Elizabeth for first time

LONDON: Two Sikh British soldiers have for the first time earned the honour of guarding Queen Elizabeth II.

26-year-old Signaler Simranjit Singh and Lance Corporal Sarvjit Singh, 28, have become the first two Sikhs to join the fleet of royal guards at the Buckingham Palace.

Signaler Singh made history to become the first personnel to wear turban on public duties guarding the 83-year-old monarch and protecting the Crown Jewels. He was soon joined by Lance Corporal Singh.

Signaler Simranjit Singh from Coventry enthusiastically took on the duty in May this year.

He serves with 21st Signal Regiment based in Chippenham, Wiltshire, while Lance Corporal serves with 3rd Regiment Army Air Corps based at Wattisham, Suffolk.

Two Sikh soldiers to guard Queen Elizabeth for first time - Indians Abroad - World - NEWS - The Times of India
 

IBM

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Can't wait to see the pic if anyhbody has... proud movement for Sikhs and India..
 

johnee

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proud movement for Sikhs and India..
Would Brits feel the same way if a few Brits were to guard Indian Royalty?

IMHO, India and Sikhs dont give two hoots about queen(or king or jack). Its obviously a proud moment for those two individuals that have been chosen for the job. But India is much bigger than any royalty(domestic or foreign).
 

Singh

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Would Brits feel the same way if a few Brits were to guard Indian Royalty?

IMHO, India and Sikhs dont give two hoots about queen(or king or jack). Its obviously a proud moment for those two individuals that have been chosen for the job. But India is much bigger than any royalty(domestic or foreign).
Johnee,

Sikhs, Indians etc might not give two hoots about monarchy etc. but its a privilege to be awarded the responsibility to guard the head of any state.

And this moment is even more significant because Sikhs even though hailed as amongst the more patriotic community in India is not allowed to be drafted in SPG ie the agency to guard VVIPs in India.

British govt by awarding this honour, acknowledges the ability of Sikhs to guard their hard of State, an honour which the Indian govt refuses to award them.
 

IBM

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Johnee,

Sikhs, Indians etc might not give two hoots about monarchy etc. but its a privilege to be awarded the responsibility to guard the head of any state.

And this moment is even more significant because Sikhs even though hailed as amongst the more patriotic community in India is not allowed to be drafted in SPG ie the agency to guard VVIPs in India.

British govt by awarding this honour, acknowledges the ability of Sikhs to guard their hard of State, an honour which the Indian govt refuses to award them.
I agree with u let me addd 2 more things

1) Sikhs,pathans, gorkha r recognised as marshals by british army and monorachy.

2) These three have won more war medals than whole of white soldier...
 

johnee

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Johnee,

Sikhs, Indians etc might not give two hoots about monarchy etc. but its a privilege to be awarded the responsibility to guard the head of any state.

And this moment is even more significant because Sikhs even though hailed as amongst the more patriotic community in India is not allowed to be drafted in SPG ie the agency to guard VVIPs in India.

British govt by awarding this honour, acknowledges the ability of Sikhs to guard their hard of State, an honour which the Indian govt refuses to award them.
Singh,
my reply was to the following statement:

proud movement for Sikhs and India..
I feel that a country and community is bigger than an individual(including British royalty). Hence, I said that while it is a great moment for the individuals involved and their families. One cant extrapolate the these feelings of jubiliation on to an entire country or community.

As for Sikhs and SPG are concerned, I think thats a twist that you gave to the incident. When IBM said that it is a pride moment for Sikhs or India, he didnt have that issue on mind IMO.

Well, anyway, I am sure you know why the Sikhs are not in SPG. There was once a famous leader(a lady) who was murdered by her own bodyguard(who were incidentally Sikh) because the said leader had, in the bodygaurd's view insulted their religion by moving troops into a holy place for Sikhs.
We know that soon after her assassination Sikhs were killed by party workers of a certain national party. The prominent leaders of the party were never punished for their wrongdoings, infact, they were even given a ticket to contest in recent National Elections. They were denied the tickets only after a lot of protesting(that involved a shoe-throwing at Home Minister) from Sikh Community. So, obviously the present Govt( and its leaders) dont feel safe around Sikhs. No wonder they are not part of SPG...

Though, of course the NDA regime could have opened the gates for Sikhs, for they have nothing to fear from Sikh community.
 

RPK

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Honour for Sikh soldier

Honour for Sikh soldier

A soldier based at Colerne has spoken of his pride after becoming the first Sikh to be given the job of guarding the Queen.

Signaller Simranjit Singh, who serves with 21 Signal Regiment, said the experience of parading in front of hundreds of tourists at Buckingham Palace and Windsor Castle had been "brilliant".

The 26-year-old soldier, known as 'Sim' to his mates, is married to his Jagtinder and joined the army in 2006 after working as an NHS helpdesk operator.

Originally from Coventry, he now works in the headquarters motor transport department looking after vehicles and radio equipment.

He and his colleagues in 21 Signals ended up in front of Buckingham Palace after the normal guards from the Household Division were busy on operational duties. When that happens, other regiments step in - and when 21 Signals did so, Sim happened to be the first Sikh to guard the royals, if only for a few weeks.


"Being in London and parading in front of hundreds of people has been brilliant," he said.

"My family and friends are very proud of me being in the army and have been down to watch the ceremony. It's been hard work but definitely worth it," he added.

Signaller Singh spent most of May guarding the Queen and will perform the duty for the last time tomorrow.

Soon after Signaller Sim's first stint in the ceremonial position, another Sikh soldier followed suit.

Lance Corporal Sarvjit Singh, 28, from 3 Regiment Army Air Corps, was born in India in 1981 but came to England in 2000 and joined the corps four years later.

His regiment has been guarding the Queen this month and will do so again during August.

"My experience being a Sikh on the Queen's Guard is beyond words. It is a once in a lifetime opportunity. I feel privileged to have this honour," he said, adding that when he learned his unit would be taking part in public duties this summer, he immediately volunteered. His brother Ardash is also serving in the regiment.

As a Sikh, Signaller Singh is exempt from wearing the traditional forage cap of his regiment, but does have the Royal Signals Corps badge on the front of his turban. The headdress, long hair and beards are considered a mandatory religious uniform for all Sikhs – keeping uncut hair is required according to the Rehat Maryada, the Sikh instruction for living.

Sikhs have long served in the British Army, particularly during colonial times. Perhaps the most famous Sikh to have served king and country was Lt Col Chanan Singh Dhillon, who fought in the British Indian Army and was taken prisoner by the Nazis in 1943.

He was held in prisoner of war camps in Italy, France and Germany and escaped many times, before being liberated by the Americans in 1944.

After the war, he rose to the rank of Lieutenant Colonel in the new Indian Army and on retirement became a tireless campaigner for full recognition of the sacrifice and courage of soldiers from the Indian subcontinent, Africa and the Caribbean, who fought for the Commonwealth in World War II.
 

BLACK_COBRA

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Thanks for the very cool information and matter of pride too..

Any pics of this soldier
 

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