Short-Range Surface-to-Air Missile ( SRSAM ) Tender

arya

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The Indian Army has entered the global market to buy short-range surface-to-air missile (SRSAM) systems for $1.5 billion, a move that could further undercut a four-year effort to develop a system with MBDA of France.

The Army convinced the Indian Defence Ministry there is an urgent requirement for SRSAM, said Army sources, and did not want to wait for the Maitri project conceived four years ago. India and France have not been able to agree on details of the Maitri project, including funding arrangements, the source added.


The Army last month sent global tenders to defense companies in Europe, the United States and Russia including Raytheon of the U.S., Israel's Rafael, MBDA and Thales of France, Diehl Defence of Germany, KBP Tula and Rosoboronexport of Russia, Ukraineexport of Ukraine and LIG NEX1 of South Korea.

The requirements of the SRSAM are similar to those of the proposed Indo-French Maitri project, the Army source said.

The current tender is for two regiments (36 systems, 1,000 missiles) estimated to cost about $800 million each. The total Indian Army requirement is likely to be about eight regiments in the next five to seven years.

The Maitri project was proposed to be jointly developed by India's Defence Research and Development Laboratory and MBDA.

The selected vendor will have to transfer technology of the systems, as well.

The supply will be made in two batches and completed within five years of the signing of the tender, including the launchers, sensors, vehicles for transportation and the missiles. The system must have a service life of at least 20 years and the missiles of not less than eight years.

The SRSAM system should be able to engage multiple targets, including those flying up to 500 meters per second, and have a maximum range of not less than 15 kilometers.

In 2009, India bought two regiments of Spyder quick-reaction surface-to-air missile systems from Rafael. Another Indo-Israeli joint project is the $2.5 billion long-range surface-to-air missile project signed in 2009 and expected to be inducted in 2013, Indian Defence Ministry sources said.

Meanwhile, the Indian Army has begun inducting the homemade medium-range Akash, which has a range of up to 30 kilometers. In 2011, the Indian Army ordered the induction of two Akash regiments at a cost of about $3 billion.

The Army also has been negotiating the purchase of David Sling and Iron Dome missile interceptor systems.
 

Zebra

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The Indian Army's Tender for short-range surface-to-air missile ( SRSAM ) .

India Casts Wider Net for Short-Range Missiles .

By VIVEK RAGHUVANSHI
Published: 13 Jan 2012 18:28

NEW DELHI - The Indian Army has entered the global market to buy short-range surface-to-air missile (SRSAM) systems for $1.5 billion, a move that could further undercut a four-year effort to develop a system with MBDA of France.

The Army convinced the Indian Defence Ministry there is an urgent requirement for SRSAM, said Army sources, and did not want to wait for the Maitri project conceived four years ago. India and France have not been able to agree on details of the Maitri project, including funding arrangements, the source added.

The Army last month sent global tenders to defense companies in Europe, the United States and Russia including Raytheon of the U.S., Israel's Rafael, MBDA and Thales of France, Diehl Defence of Germany, KBP Tula and Rosoboronexport of Russia, Ukraineexport of Ukraine and LIG NEX1 of South Korea.

The requirements of the SRSAM are similar to those of the proposed Indo-French Maitri project, the Army source said.

The current tender is for two regiments (36 systems, 1,000 missiles) estimated to cost about $800 million each. The total Indian Army requirement is likely to be about eight regiments in the next five to seven years.

The Maitri project was proposed to be jointly developed by India's Defence Research and Development Laboratory and MBDA.

The selected vendor will have to transfer technology of the systems, as well.

The supply will be made in two batches and completed within five years of the signing of the tender, including the launchers, sensors, vehicles for transportation and the missiles. The system must have a service life of at least 20 years and the missiles of not less than eight years.

The SRSAM system should be able to engage multiple targets, including those flying up to 500 meters per second, and have a maximum range of not less than 15 kilometers.

In 2009, India bought two regiments of Spyder quick-reaction surface-to-air missile systems from Rafael. Another Indo-Israeli joint project is the $2.5 billion long-range surface-to-air missile project signed in 2009 and expected to be inducted in 2013, Indian Defence Ministry sources said.

Meanwhile, the Indian Army has begun inducting the homemade medium-range Akash, which has a range of up to 30 kilometers. In 2011, the Indian Army ordered the induction of two Akash regiments at a cost of about $3 billion.

The Army also has been negotiating the purchase of David Sling and Iron Dome missile interceptor systems.

India Casts Wider Net for Short-Range Missiles - Defense News
 

plugwater

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Why new tender ?

Give it to IAI since we are going to get same kinda missiles from them, atleast it will reduce the logistics headache.
 

Payeng

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Why new tender ?

Give it to IAI since we are going to get same kinda missiles from them, atleast it will reduce the logistics headache.
Yes they got the Barak defending current CV and Barak 8 to defend the future CVs, while MRSAM will also see a lots of money spend in that field with an XRSAM for the Army, the SRSAM is projected to field 4000 such missiles in the future, combining all this this would be a mega project/ tender from short range to a possible long range like 300 km SAM that would define India's future Air defense Arm, moreover it should be tried to cover up the needs of all three defence arms i.e. Army, Air Force, Navy for commonality of equipment, which would lower the cost of acquiring the equipment, as a whole this become a mega project which a seller would not like to reject, I suppose. India's mileage from such a project should be sharing of cost of development and profit from sales, collaboration on future development would pave the way for DRDO for gaining experience too.

Cant their the a unified effort of trying to choose a common platform just like the BrahMos is suppose to be fielded by all the three services.

It comes as an opportunity for India for future collaboration and development with Israel as Rafael systems are already used for the Navy and Air Force, some thing more then a buyer seller relation.
 

Galaxy

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India Casts Wider Net for Short-Range Missiles

India Casts Wider Net for Short-Range Missiles

NEW DELHI - The Indian Army has entered the global market to buy short-range surface-to-air missile (SRSAM) systems for $1.5 billion, a move that could further undercut a four-year effort to develop a system with MBDA of France.

The Army convinced the Indian Defence Ministry there is an urgent requirement for SRSAM, said Army sources, and did not want to wait for the Maitri project conceived four years ago. India and France have not been able to agree on details of the Maitri project, including funding arrangements, the source added.

The Army last month sent global tenders to defense companies in Europe, the United States and Russia including Raytheon of the U.S., Israel's Rafael, MBDA and Thales of France, Diehl Defence of Germany, KBP Tula and Rosoboronexport of Russia, Ukraineexport of Ukraine and LIG NEX1 of South Korea.

The requirements of the SRSAM are similar to those of the proposed Indo-French Maitri project, the Army source said.

The current tender is for two regiments (36 systems, 1,000 missiles) estimated to cost about $800 million each. The total Indian Army requirement is likely to be about eight regiments in the next five to seven years.

The Maitri project was proposed to be jointly developed by India's Defence Research and Development Laboratory and MBDA.

The selected vendor will have to transfer technology of the systems, as well.

The supply will be made in two batches and completed within five years of the signing of the tender, including the launchers, sensors, vehicles for transportation and the missiles. The system must have a service life of at least 20 years and the missiles of not less than eight years.

The SRSAM system should be able to engage multiple targets, including those flying up to 500 meters per second, and have a maximum range of not less than 15 kilometers.

In 2009, India bought two regiments of Spyder quick-reaction surface-to-air missile systems from Rafael. Another Indo-Israeli joint project is the $2.5 billion long-range surface-to-air missile project signed in 2009 and expected to be inducted in 2013, Indian Defence Ministry sources said.

Meanwhile, the Indian Army has begun inducting the homemade medium-range Akash, which has a range of up to 30 kilometers. In 2011, the Indian Army ordered the induction of two Akash regiments at a cost of about $3 billion.

The Army also has been negotiating the purchase of David Sling and Iron Dome missile interceptor systems.

India Casts Wider Net for Short-Range Missiles - Defense News
 

[email protected]

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why did the drdo scrap the trishul project especially since the drdo has struck to all failing projects like prithvi,agni,arjun,nag,lca,akash and made them turn into roaring success?
 

SajeevJino

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Saab India and Ashok Leyland team up for SRSAM




Saab and Ashok Leyland are teaming to meet the SRSAM requirement with a new solution that combines the Saab BAMSE missile system with Ashok Leyland high-mobility vehicles.

The Saab BAMSE SRSAM is an all-weather, all-target, air defence missile system that can be deployed to protect fixed and mobile assets. The BAMSE SRSAM is a purpose-built ground-based air defence missile and is the latest in a long line of successfully developed and deployed Saab missile systems.

Ashok Leyland will deliver high-mobility vehicles to transport the BAMSE SRSAM solution. All sub-units within the BAMSE SRSAM are being integrated with the Ashok Leyland Super Stallion 8x8, a high-mobility vehicle capable of operating in all types of terrain under all weather conditions.

Saab's Head of Market Area India Lars-Olof Lindgren says, "The tie-up brings together two great engineering companies with front-end technologies that together could serve the Indian Army well. The BAMSE is a proven air defence missile system and the Ashok Leyland platform is a very suitable all-terrain vehicle. The need for mobility for air defence units is essential for flexible and optimal deployment. We are very happy to find a robust vehicle in Ashok Leyland's product range that meets the requirements. We look forward to working closely with the company to deliver to the needs of the Indian Army."

Dr. V. Sumantran, Vice-Chairman of Ashok Leyland says: "We are pleased to announce this cooperation with Saab and together we are able to offer the Indian defence forces, state-of-the-art air defence systems based on proven technologies. Saab is a recognised technology leader and in the BAMSE Saab has a very advanced and capable system. Ashok Leyland has a proven track record of serving the mobility needs of the Indian armed forces for over three decades. Our Super-Stallion 8x8 platform will offer the best combination of performance and reliability".

The complete SRSAM system includes the GIRAFFE AMB, a powerful 3D surveillance radar and command and control system intended for short and medium-range ground based air defence and the BAMSE MCC missile launcher with six ready-to-fire missiles.


Saab And Ashok Leyland Team Up For SRSAM
 

Jagdish58

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Saab Group and Ashok Leyland Team to Offer BAMSE air Defense for India

The Swedish defence and security company Saab Group and India's transport specialist Ashok Leyland have joined forces to compete for the Indian Army Short Range Surface to Air Missile (SRSAM) air defence programme. Saab and Ashok Leyland are teaming to meet the SRSAM requirement with a new solution that combines the Saab BAMSE missile system with Ashok Leyland high-mobility vehicles.

Saab's Head of Market Area India Lars-Olof Lindgren says, "the tie-up brings together two great engineering companies with front-end technologies that together could serve the Indian Army well. The BAMSE is a proven air defence missile system and the Ashok Leyland platform is a very suitable all-terrain vehicle. The need for mobility for air defence units is essential for flexible and optimal deployment. We are very happy to find a robust vehicle in Ashok Leyland's product range that meets the requirements. We look forward to working closely with the company to deliver to the needs of the Indian Army."

The Saab BAMSE SRSAM is an all-weather, all-target, air defence missile system that can be deployed to protect fixed and mobile assets. The BAMSE SRSAM is a purpose-built ground-based air defence missile and is the latest in a long line of successfully developed and deployed Saab missile systems.

Ashok Leyland will deliver high-mobility vehicles to transport the BAMSE SRSAM solution. All sub-units within the BAMSE SRSAM are being integrated with the Ashok Leyland Super Stallion 8×8, a high-mobility vehicle capable of operating in all types of terrain under all weather conditions.



Dr. V. Sumantran, Vice-Chairman of Ashok Leyland says: "we are pleased to announce this cooperation with Saab and together we are able to offer the Indian defence forces, state-of-the-art air defence systems based on proven technologies. Saab is a recognised technology leader and in the BAMSE Saab has a very advanced and capable system. Ashok Leyland has a proven track record of serving the mobility needs of the Indian armed forces for over three decades. Our Super-Stallion 8×8 platform will offer the best combination of performance and reliability".

The complete SRSAM system includes the GIRAFFE AMB, a powerful 3D surveillance radar and command and control system intended for short and medium-range ground based air defence and the BAMSE MCC missile launcher with six ready-to-fire missiles.

Source: http://defense-update.com/20140205_...eam-offer-bamse-air-defense-indias-srsam.html
 

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