Pakistan created and nurtured terrorists, admits Zardari

Yusuf

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ISLAMABAD: For the first time, Pakistan President Asif Ali Zardari has admitted that militants and extremists were "created and nurtured" in the country as a policy to achieve some short-term tactical objectives.

But they began to haunt the country in the post-9/11 era, Zardari said in a candid admission during an interactive meeting with former senior civil servants at the presidency last night.

Militants and extremists emerged on the national scene and challenged the state not because the civil bureaucracy was weakened and demoralised, but because they "were deliberately created and nurtured as a policy to achieve some short-term tactical objectives," he said.

"Let us be truthful to ourselves and make a candid admission of the realities," Zardari said.

"The terrorists of today were the heroes of yesteryears until 9/11 occurred and they began to haunt us as well," he added.

Labelling Pakistan as a frontline state in the war against terrorism, Zardari pledged to eliminate this scourge from society. "I have taken charge at a difficult time and will come up to the challenges the country is facing."

His remarks came days after his comments in an interview that the Pakistan Army would even target militants it had backed in the past for use as a proxy force against India.

The army is currently engaged in a campaign against the Taliban in the northwestern Swat valley and is gearing up for a push against Tehrik-e-Taliban Pakistan chief Baitullah Mehsud and his network in South Waziristan tribal region.

Zardari also stressed the need for greater national reconciliation, saying he intended to keep all political forces together because Pakistan cannot afford confrontation at this juncture.

"Dialogue is our most powerful weapon...we defeated a dictator through the power of dialogue and we intend to continue holding dialogue to resolve various issues confronting Pakistan," he said.

"We are on the brink and we must realise that personal political games can no longer be played," he added.

Responding to various suggestions by the former civil servants, Zardari said the government is taking several steps to improve governance, tackle militancy and extremism, improve law and order, agricultural output and power generation, strengthen institutions and devolve power.
Pakistan created and nurtured terrorists, admits Zardari - Pakistan - World - The Times of India
 

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Pakistan created and nurtured terrorists, admits Zardari

8 Jul 2009, 1422 hrs IST, PTI

ISLAMABAD: For the first time, Pakistan President Asif Ali Zardari has admitted that militants and extremists were "created and nurtured" in the country as a policy to achieve some short-term tactical objectives.

But they began to haunt the country in the post-9/11 era, Zardari said in a candid admission during an interactive meeting with former senior civil servants at the presidency last night.

Militants and extremists emerged on the national scene and challenged the state not because the civil bureaucracy was weakened and demoralised, but because they "were deliberately created and nurtured as a policy to achieve some short-term tactical objectives," he said.

"Let us be truthful to ourselves and make a candid admission of the realities," Zardari said.

"The terrorists of today were the heroes of yesteryears until 9/11 occurred and they began to haunt us as well," he added.

Labelling Pakistan as a frontline state in the war against terrorism, Zardari pledged to eliminate this scourge from society. "I have taken charge at a difficult time and will come up to the challenges the country is facing."

His remarks came days after his comments in an interview that the Pakistan Army would even target militants it had backed in the past for use as a proxy force against India.

The army is currently engaged in a campaign against the Taliban in the northwestern Swat valley and is gearing up for a push against Tehrik-e-Taliban Pakistan chief Baitullah Mehsud and his network in South Waziristan tribal region.

Zardari also stressed the need for greater national reconciliation, saying he intended to keep all political forces together because Pakistan cannot afford confrontation at this juncture.

"Dialogue is our most powerful weapon...we defeated a dictator through the power of dialogue and we intend to continue holding dialogue to resolve various issues confronting Pakistan," he said.

"We are on the brink and we must realise that personal political games can no longer be played," he added.

Responding to various suggestions by the former civil servants, Zardari said the government is taking several steps to improve governance, tackle militancy and extremism, improve law and order, agricultural output and power generation, strengthen institutions and devolve power.
 

Daredevil

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Nuclear-armed India, Pak can't take over each other: Zardari

Nuclear-armed India, Pak can't take over each other: Zardari

6 Jul 2009, 1650 hrs IST, PTI


LONDON: With his forces battling Taliban in the country's troubled northwest, Pakistan President Asif Ali Zardari does not see India as the foremost threat and says the "position of being able to take over another state is nullified" after both countries acquired nuclear arms.

As his goodwill gestures towards India clubbed with a domestic campaign to end militancy have attracted criticism at home, Zardari says "it rankles the small mind."

"It does not rankle the army, because after India and Pakistan became nuclear powers, that position of being able to take over another state is nullified," the President said.

In remarks that may give a boost to the US hopes for a united front against al-Qaeda and Taliban, Zardari said that his security forces' operations against militants would in future target figures who were the military's "strategic assets".

Pakistan's powerful military had given its backing in recent days to Zardari's shift from seeing India as the foremost threat to the country towards the danger posed by militancy inside.

"I don't think anybody in the establishment supports them (militants) any more," he said. "Military operations are all across the board against any insurgent whether in Karachi, Lahore or whether he is in any part of Pakistan," Zardari said.
 

Pintu

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Great thread started DD, kudos for it.

So , at last any constitutional head of the armed forces of Pakistan, president of Pakistan Mr. Zardari, admits that his country is the mother of terrorism in India. Now the nations who backs Pakistan's 'Fight against terror' , can they trust Pakistan's credibility, it is to be seen and as well as the reaction of his countrymen.

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ZOOM

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Great thread started DD, kudos for it.

So , at last any constitutional head of the armed forces of Pakistan, president of Pakistan Mr. Zardari, admits that his country is the mother of terrorism in India. Now the nations who backs Pakistan's 'Fight against terror' , can they trust Pakistan's credibility, it is to be seen and as well as the reaction of his countrymen.

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You need to re-read what Zardari has said as per the above articles. He didn't specificially named any Pakistani Entity behind this Terror outfits creation. He only brushed away by saying that "Terrorist were given support in Pakistan", but maintain a caution by not naming who were supporting the same.
 

Flint

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Its quite clear that he's talking about the Taliban, and not the Kashmir-centric groups.
 

SATISH

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Yawn!....What happened? Did anything told by him makes sense?... I dont think so. This is just a new form of Zardari deviating from the topic.
 

Pintu

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You need to re-read what Zardari has said as per the above articles. He didn't specificially named any Pakistani Entity behind this Terror outfits creation. He only brushed away by saying that "Terrorist were given support in Pakistan", but maintain a caution by not naming who were supporting the same.
Thanks Zoom for your advice to re reading the article, I have posted the previous comments after checking the article, and my opinion is based on following logic :

"The terrorists of today were the heroes of yesteryears until 9/11 occurred and they began to haunt us as well," he added.
Now, who are the 'heroes of yesteryears', he mentioned , the yesteryear heroes are not only Taliban but it is not much difficult to assume that terrorist in Kashmir are also included in 'heroes of yesteryear', whom they call 'Freedom Fighters' and also to be remembered that , it was Zardari who first (Pakistan's constitutional head of the armed forces), termed them 'Terrorist' : BBC NEWS | South Asia | Fury over Zardari Kashmir comment

"were deliberately created and nurtured as a policy to achieve some short-term tactical objectives,"
Another false assertion from him, it is not difficult to understand that terrorism is not nurtured for short term gain but for long term tactical advantage. Now if we see the sphere that is Jammu and Kashmir, where Pakistan independently took the idea of sponsoring terrorism, The act of 'deliberate' creation is evident here.

And it is very easy to understand the creators of the Militancy, if it is sponsored in a sovereign nation by any other country, and three organs of that country work there : 1. Head of State or leaders of the administration 2. Armed Forces 3. Intelligence. So if we take this three , the statement goes quite clear, and it is very easy to get it though the 'destination' is not named.

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Pintu

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Its quite clear that he's talking about the Taliban, and not the Kashmir-centric groups.
Flint , you believe Taliban were created for short term gains , ok, but I think this was a long term policy from Pakistan.


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Flint

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Flint , you believe Taliban were created for short term gains , ok, but I think this was a long term policy from Pakistan.


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I didn't say anything of that sort....
 

Pintu

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I didn't say anything of that sort....
Ok.. I have assumed this after Pakistani President zardari claimed Terrorists were created for gaining short term tactical advantages and from your comment :

Its quite clear that he's talking about the Taliban, and not the Kashmir-centric groups.
My bad, I am wrong then.


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EnlightenedMonk

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Yes, he seems to be talking only about the Taliban and not the LeT, JeM and their other counterparts which wreak havoc on the other side...

But still, Zardari's the best bet we've got, he's the only moderate that I see there who might be in a position of doing something to actually try and quell terror in the long run... if he goes then Pakistan will be taken over by Gilani & Co, which is definitely not good news for us...
 

Pintu

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May be EM you are right, but still I opine otherwise........

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===================================================================

COLUMN - Pakistan's elephant in the drawing room | South Asia | Reuters

COLUMN - Pakistan's elephant in the drawing room

Thu Jul 9, 2009 12:32pm IST



(C. Uday Bhaskar is a New Delhi-based strategic analyst. The views expressed in the column are his own)

By C. Uday Bhaskar

Pakistan President Asif Ali Zardari, widower of charismatic former Prime Minister Benazir Bhutto, has shown rare courage this week.

This was evident on July 7 when he addressed retired bureaucrats and asserted: "Let us be truthful to ourselves and make a candid admission of the (domestic) realities."

Dwelling on the current challenge posed by the Taliban and its support base within Pakistan, he added that these were a 'deliberate creation' of the establishment in the past.

"Militancy and extremism emerged on the national scene and challenged the state not because the civil bureaucracy was weakened and demoralized, but because they were deliberately created and nurtured as a policy to achieve some short-term tactical objectives," he elucidated.

This is an accurate assessment about the elephant in the Pakistani drawing room -- but till recently it was both blasphemous and anti-national in Islamabad to acknowledge this truth.

Now that this assertion has the stamp of the Pakistani President it would be reasonable to infer that there will be a flurry of both introspection and invective.

Pakistan has been living in a state of strategic denial about itself and this distorted narrative has been nurtured by the military-mullah 'establishment' abetted by a predatory clique that has advanced its own agenda.

The seeds for this distortion of the Islamic faith to stoke religious radicalism, militancy morphing into wanton terrorism and extremism were laid during the General Zia-ul-Haq years and this was reiterated earlier in the week.

On July 5, some sections of Pakistan led by Zardari's Pakistan People's Party (PPP) observed a Black Day to recall the 'tragedy' of July 5, 1977 when General Zia overthrew PM Zulfiqar Ali Bhutto (father of Benazir) and began the long military rule.

Senior PPP leaders castigated General Zia for overthrowing a democratically elected government and accused him of having massacred the people's Constitution of 1973.

They also noted that Pakistan is now at a war that is the legacy of General Zia and his successor in 1999, General Pervez Musharraf.

The military-led establishment in Pakistan has kept alive a false narrative that Hindu India represents an existential threat to its survival and tried to 'legitimize' the support to terrorism.

The truth about the 1971 war that led to the birth of Bangladesh was suppressed and an intense but invalid persecuted nationalism kept alive.

India became the 'dushman desh' -- enemy country -- and its Hindu identity emphasized despite the reality that India has more Muslim citizens than even Pakistan and is second only to Indonesia.

Soon after becoming President, Zardari made many radical statements about Pakistan and its relationship with India -- and had to retract his position later due to the complex power grid in his country.

But today with the anti-Taliban operations in the troubled Swat and Buner areas appearing to have succeeded, it is a more confident President Zardari who is asserting himself and exhorting his country to accept the realities about its security compulsions.

India is the red-herring that has been skilfully used for decades to create a virtual reality about Pakistan's military options.

The Pakistan military cannot hope to get away with a repeat of a conventional war as in 1965 or the kind of ill-advised covert ingress of 1999 in Kargil.

If the Zardari candour is not taken to its logical conclusion -- a deep and sustained introspection about false narratives and selective distortion -- there may well be a replay of the domestic discord in the run-up to the 1971 and the dismemberment that followed.

President Zardari may not have been explicit but the sub-text of his remarks to the retired bureaucrats on July 7 is sagacious.

"We intend to keep all the political forces together in a harmonious relationship as we (Pakistan) cannot afford political games and confrontational politics. We are at the brink and we must realize that political games for personal gain can no longer be played," he cautioned.

Now it is for the Pakistan Muslim League-Nawaz -- PML(N) -- and Pakistan Muslim League-Quaid-e-Azam -- PML(Q) -- to rise to the occasion and close ranks with the PPP - but can Pakistan break the Sisyphean jinx that has afflicted it since inception?
 

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DAWN.COM | Provinces | Jihad and the state

Jihad and the state

Dawn Editorial
Thursday, 09 Jul, 2009 | 08:48 AM PST |


How is it possible to rationally explain to the people of Pakistan that the heroes of yesteryear are the
arch-enemies of today? — Reuters

Twice this week President Zardari has spoken about the root of Pakistan’s problems with religious extremism and militancy. In an interview with The Daily Telegraph, the president said that the military’s erstwhile ‘strategic assets’ were the ones against whom military operations were now required. And in a meeting with retired senior bureaucrats in Islamabad on Tuesday, Mr Zardari was reported in this paper to have said that ‘militants and extremists had been deliberately created and nurtured as a policy to achieve some short-term tactical objectives’.



The president is right, and we would add the policy was wrong then and it is wrong now. It cannot be any other way. How is it possible to rationally explain to the people of Pakistan that the heroes of yesteryear are the arch-enemies of today? The militants’ religious justifications remain the same; what’s changed is that the militants were fighting the state’s ‘enemies’ yesterday but have turned their guns on the state and its allies today.


Perhaps more than anything else impeding the defeat of the militants today is the inability of the security establishment to revisit the strategic choices it made in the past and hold up its hand and admit candidly that grave mistakes were made. Should we have ever used jihadi proxies to fight the Russians in Afghanistan? Should we have ever supported the idea of armed jihad in Kashmir? Should we have ever sought to retain our influence in Afghanistan through the Taliban? If any of those choices ever made sense, then we should have no complaints about the rise of Talibanisation in Pakistan because we created the climate and opportunity for them to run amok.



Blaming the US’s invasion of Afghanistan is no good — the first and foremost responsibility of the state is to ensure the security of Pakistan, and allowing an internal threat to create a space for itself is anathema to that idea. Whatever the catalyst, the fact remains that it was because a jihadi network was allowed to flourish inside the country that we were left exposed to its eventual wrath against us.


The fault is of course not ours alone. The US, obsessed with the Soviet enemy, happily colluded in the creation of Muslim warriors. Our Middle Eastern and Gulf allies were happy to create a Sunni army to counter the ‘threat’ from post-revolution Shia Iran. But, at the end of the day, it was Pakistani soil on which they were primarily nurtured. Because they were raised in our midst we should have always been wary of the extreme blowback we are now confronted with.
 

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Zardari's admission a 'healthy' sign: Govt- Hindustan Times

Zardari's admission a 'healthy' sign: Govt

Press Trust Of India
New Delhi, July 09, 2009

First Published: 16:04 IST(9/7/2009)
Last Updated: 16:20 IST(9/7/2009)

Terming as a "healthy sign" Pakistan President Asif Ali Zardari's admission that terrorism has been "created and nurtured" by the establishment there for tactical gains, India on Thursday said it wanted see actions which show his "serious change of heart".

"It's a healthy sign. We certainly would like action that shows his (Zardari's) serious change of heart when it comes to such activities emanating from Pakistani territory against our country," Minister of State for External Affairs Shashi Tharoor told reporters in New Delhi.

For the first time, Zardari admitted during an interactive meeting with former senior civil servants on Tuesday night that militants and extremists were "created and nurtured" in Pakistan as a policy to achieve some short-term tactical objectives.

Tharoor said New Delhi had expressed similar views that some of the actions emanating from Pakistan appeared to have been in pursuance of this policy of Islamabad which Zardari has now confirmed.
 

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Pak yesterday: We created terror; Pak today: Hmmm we didn't mean that

Pak yesterday: We created terror; Pak today: Hmmm we didn't mean that

Published on Thu 9th Jul 2009 18:47:22
Islamabad, July 9 :

Playing down President Asif Ali's remarks that Pakistan ‘created and nurtured’ militants to achieve short-term objectives, the government said the statement should be seen in the context of the situation that prevailed after Soviet forces pulled out of Afghanistan.

Foreign Office spokesman Abdul Basit said the President was referring to the period when the ‘West left Pakistan high and dry after the withdrawal of Soviet troops’ from Afghanistan.

Since the 9/11 terrorist attacks in the US, Pakistan has been dealing with the ‘spill-over effects of the Afghan war,’ Basit said in reply to a question about Zardari's comments.

He said there is a need to ‘transcend limited objectives’ and to adopt a comprehensive and holistic approach to tackle issues and problems in the region.

During a meeting with former senior civil servants on Tuesday, Zardari had said militants and extremists were ‘deliberately created and nurtured’ in Pakistan as a policy to achieve ‘some short-term tactical objectives’.

"The terrorists of today were the heroes of yesteryears until 9/11 occurred and they began to haunt us as well," he had said.

Earlier this week, Zardari said in an interview that military operations were required against militants who were considered as ‘strategic assets’ in the past.

ZARDARI: PAK CREATED MILITANCY

Pakistan now seems to be feeling the heat of the fire it had lighted years ago, with President Asif Ali Zardari admitting that the menace of extremism and militancy were created by Islamabad itself to attain some tactical goals.

Addressing a gathering of retired federal secretaries and senior bureaucrats here, Zardari asked the officials to admit the reality.

“Let us be truthful to ourselves and make a candid admission of the realities. Militancy and extremism emerged on the national scene and challenged the state not because the civil bureaucracy was weakened and demoralised, but because they were deliberately created and nurtured as a policy to achieve some short-term tactical objectives,” The Daily Times quoted Zardari, as saying.

Referring to the political turmoil in the country, Zardari said Pakistan cannot afford political brick batting at present, as the state is on the verge of collapse due to the impending threat from the Taliban and other terror organizations.

“We intend to keep all the political forces together in a harmonious relationship as we cannot afford political games and confrontational politics. We are at the brink and we must realize that political games for personal gain can no longer be played,” he said.

Zardari also stressed on the need of dispersing power to different hands for effective governance.

“Too much power, when concentrated in one hand lasts only for a short time. For power to be effectively used for long-lasting public good it must be diffused and dispersed as widely as possible,” he added.
 

Ray

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Say what you want, but Zardari on many an occasion has made very bold statements and appears to be genuine.

It is the ISI, Army and that fool Gilani who are opposing him!

But then he has a disadvantage in Pakistan - he is a Shia!
 

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