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smooth manifold

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China's most powerful rocket Long March 5 is back!


Local time 20:45, 27 Dec 2019, China's Long March 5 rocket launched a next generation communication satellite Shijian-20 from Wenchang Satellite Launch Center, paving the way for multiple crucial missions in 2020.

The mission is the 323 flight of Long March series.

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xizhimen

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China launches powerful Long March 5 space rocket

AFP | Dec 27, 2019, 21:26 IST



BEIJING: China on Friday launched one of the world's most powerful rockets in a crucial step for its planned mission to Mars in 2020.

The heavy lift Long March 5 rocket blasted off from the Wenchang launch site on the southern island of Hainan at 8:45pm (1245 GMT), a livestreamed feed from CCTV state television showed.

https://timesofindia.indiatimes.com...march-5-space-rocket/articleshow/72996926.cms
 

smooth manifold

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Summary of Chinese space activitives in 2019

China conducted 34 orbital launches, more than any other country.
With 2 failures, one was made by CASC, the other one made by a private firm Onespace.

Highlights

1. Chang'E 4 soft landing on the far side of the moon



2. Return-to-flight of China's most powerful rocket Long March 5


3. Completion of core of Beidou global navigation constellation


4. Controlled deorbit of Tiangong 2 space lab


Other minor events such as China's first private orbital launch by iSpace and China's first sea launch by Long March 11 are also worth mentioning.

What's up for 2020? Stay tuned...
 

xizhimen

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China's largest carrier rocket Long March-5 makes new flight
Source: Xinhua| 2019-12-27 21:35:07

WENCHANG, Hainan, Dec. 27 (Xinhua) -- China launched the third Long March-5, the largest carrier rocket of the country, from Wenchang Space Launch Center in south China's Hainan Province on Friday evening.

The rocket, coded as Long March-5 Y3, blasted off from the coastal launch center at 8:45 p.m. (Beijing time), carrying the Shijian-20 technological experiment satellite weighing over eight tonnes, the heaviest and most advanced communications satellite of the country.

About 2,220 seconds later, the satellite was sent into its planned orbit.


 

xizhimen

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Successful Long March 5 launch opens way for China’s major space plans
by Andrew Jones — December 27, 2019

China is clear to proceed with plans for a Mars rover mission, lunar sample return and space station module test flight in 2020 following a successful return-to-flight of the Long March 5 rocket.


HELSINKI — China is clear to embark on ambitious exploration and space station missions following a successful return-to-flight Friday of the Long March 5.

Liftoff from the Wenchang Satellite Launch Center, south China, occurred at 7:45 a.m. Eastern. The Shijian-20 communications satellite successfully separated from the upper stage and entered geostationary transfer orbit 40 minutes later.

The China Aerospace Science and Technology Corporation (CASC), the state-owned main contractor for the country’s space programs, declared mission success within an hour of launch.

The near 8-metric-ton Shijian-20 is based on the new large DFH-5 communications satellite bus. It will test Q/V band and laser communications.

The nominal launch means China can proceed testing a derivative launcher needed to construct its planned space station and attempt to launch its first independent interplanetary mission — to Mars — in summer 2020. The Chang’e-5 lunar sample return mission is expected to follow late 2020.

Chinese state media have been regularly promoting the country’s major missions planned for 2020, many of which depend on the Long March 5. Another failure would have been a cause of embarrassment for the leadership and likely brought heavy scrutiny upon CASC.

The launch comes over 900 days after the failure of the second Long March 5 mission, in July 2017. The cause of that failure was a faulty oxidizer turbopump which has since been redesigned at least twice.

Long March 5
The Long March 5 is a new generation launch vehicle with close to twice the payload capacity of the most powerful older Chinese rocket, making it crucial to China’s major plans over the next decade. These include missions to Mars, the lunar polar regions, and a solar polar orbit telescope project.

The 57-meter high, 867,000-kilogram launcher has an optional third stage, employed in today’s mission. The first stage uses liquid hydrogen and liquid oxygen propellant in contrast to the toxic hypergolic mix used by older Long March launchers.

The Long March 5 is capable of delivering 14 metric tons to geostationary transfer orbit and 8.2 tons to trans lunar injection. The derivative Long March 5B will be able to deliver 25 tons to low Earth orbit and is designed to launch modules for the Chinese Space Station.

Space station schedule, engine redesign
The Long March 5B could now launch as soon as the first half of 2020 and will be carrying a boilerplate test version of a new generation crewed spacecraft for deep space. If this test flight goes well, China will begin preparations for launching its first space station module. The 20-metric-ton ‘Tianhe’ core module was previously slated for launch in 2018 before the 2017 Long March 5 failure.

Preparations for the launch began in October with delivery of the rocket components to Wenchang. While most Chinese launchers are delivered by rail, the five-meter-diameter Long March 5 needs to be transported via specially designed cargo ships.

CASC stated Jan. 29 that it planned a return-to-flight of the Long March 5 for July. SpaceNews reported June 21 that the launch was not going to meet this schedule.

A Chinese language article by China Youth Daily published July 26 article stated that a ‘substantial’ redesign of the YF-77 turbopump had recently taken place. This included the addition of guide vanes and use of nickel superalloys instead of stainless steel.

Apparent swift progress was made, resulting in the third Long March 5 being delivered to Wenchang late October.

https://spacenews.com/successful-long-march-5-launch-opens-way-for-chinas-major-space-plans/

 
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smooth manifold

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Successful Long March 5 launch paves way for new Chinese space missions
https://spaceflightnow.com/2019/12/...nch-paves-way-for-new-chinese-space-missions/

The third launch of China’s heavy-lift Long March 5 rocket successfully delivered its satellite payload to orbit Friday, validating engine design changes after a failure on the Long March 5’s second flight, and clearing the way for the launch of a Chinese Mars rover and lunar sample return mission in 2020.


The 187-foot-tall (57-meter) rocket, the most powerful in China’s fleet, lifted off from the Wenchang Satellite Launch Center on Hainan Island in southern China at 1245 GMT (7:45 a.m. EST; 8:45 p.m. Beijing time) Friday.

A live video stream on Chinese state television showed the Long March 5 rocket firing into cloudy skies over the coastal launch base in China’s southernmost province.

Ten engines powered the Long March 5 into the sky with nearly 2.4 million pounds of thrust, carrying an experimental communications satellite named Shijian 20 into space.

The launch Friday marked the first flight of a Long March 5 rocket since the launcher’s second mission in July 2017 ended in failure, prompting a two-and-a-half-year grounding and redesign effort.

The successful return-to-flight of the Long March 5 rocket Friday paves the way for China to move forward with plans to launch a pair of ambitious robotic deep space missions using Long March 5 rockets in 2020.

China’s first Mars rover is scheduled for launch on a Long March 5 in mid-2020, and the Chinese Chang’e 5 lunar sample return mission will also require the Long March 5’s lift capability to depart Earth and head for the moon.

Friday’s mission was critical for the Mars and moon missions to launch on their current schedules.

The launch of Chang’e 5 has already been delayed due to the grounding of the Long March 5 after the 2017 failure. China’s Mars mission must launch during a several-week-long period in mid-2020, or else wait until 2022, when Earth and Mars are in the proper positions again to make a direct interplanetary journey possible.

A future variant of the Long March 5 rocket will also launch modules of China’s planned human-rated space station, scheduled to be completed in 2022, adding another layer of importance to Friday’s test launch. The Long March 5B configuration, which is tailored for space station module launches, could debut some time in the second half of 2020 carrying a prototype of China’s next-generation human-rated spaceship on an unpiloted demonstration flight.

The Long March 5 is the heaviest rocket in China’s fleet, and one of the most powerful launcher’s in the world. The Long March 5 can deliver up to 14 metric tons — nearly 31,000 pounds — to geostationary transfer orbit, a popular target orbit for large communications satellites.

Chinese teams loaded the Long March 5 rocket at the Wenchang space base with liquid hydrogen, kerosene and liquid oxygen propellants ahead of the launcher’s blastoff Friday.

Gantry arms on the Long March 5’s 300-foot-tall (92-meter) launch pad tower opened in the final phase of the countdown, and a member of the Chinese launch team crisply called out the final seconds before liftoff.

Sparklers fired underneath the Long March 5 moments before ignition of the core stage’s twin YF-77 hydrogen-fueled engines. Moments later, eight kerosene-fed YF-100 engines ignited on the Long March 5 rocket’s four strap-on boosters to propel the launcher off the pad.

After ascending through clouds, the Long March 5 arced toward the east from the Wenchang launch base. Cameras mounted on-board the rocket showed the four liquid-fueled boosters shutting down their engines and jettisoning to fall into the South China Sea some three minutes into the mission.

The two YF-77 engines on the Long March 5’s core stage burned their supply super-cold liquid hydrogen and liquid oxygen propellants for nearly eight minutes. During the first stage burn, the Long March 5 released its clamshell-like payload fairing once the launcher climbed above the thick, lower layers of the atmosphere.

Two restartable hydrogen-fueled YF-75D engines driving the Long March 5’s second stage fired next in the launch sequence.

The second stage engines performed two firings before deploying the Shijian 20 communications satellite into an elliptical, or egg-shaped, transfer orbit stretching more than 42,000 miles (about 68,000 kilometers) from Earth at its most distant point.

A forward-facing camera on the Long March 5’s second stage showed the Shijian 20 spacecraft separating from the rocket, prompting applause in the launch control center.

The Shijian 20 spacecraft will use its own propulsion system to circularize its orbit at geostationary altitude more than 22,000 miles (nearly 36,000 kilometers) over the equator.

China’s third Long March 5 launch followed the same profile that engineers planned for the second Long March 5 flight in July 2017.

But a first stage engine failure on that mission prevented the rocket from reaching orbit, destroying the Shijian 18 communications satellite. China declared the first Long March 5 launch in November 2016 a success, despite a rocket problem that forced the Long March 5’s Yuanzheng upper stage to burn longer to place the Shijian 17 technology demonstration satellite into its planned orbit.

Investigators traced the cause of the July 2017 launch failure to a turbopump on one of the Long March 5’s two YF-77 first stage engines.

The YF-77 engine failure occurred in a “complex thermal environment” around six minutes after liftoff, leading to an instantaneous loss of thrust, according to Chinese investigators. Engineers redesigned the engine turbine exhaust structure for future Long March 5 missions, forcing officials to scrap engine parts already in stock.

The changes led to a gap of more than two years between the second and third Long March 5 flights. In the interim between launches, engineers conducted test-firings of the modified YF-77 engine to verify the design changes, according to the State Administration for Science, Technology and Industry for National Defense, or SASTIND, the Chinese government agency that oversees the country’s space activities.

The YF-77 engines were developed specifically for the Long March 5.

In addition to introducing changes to resolve the YF-77 engine problem, Chinese engineers simplified some structures on the Long March 5 rocket to make it lighter, increasing the launcher’s carrying capacity, according to the China Academy of Launch Vehicle Technology, the country’s lead state-owned contractor for the Long March rocket family.

The Shijian 20 satellite launched Friday will replace the Shijian 18 satellite lost on the Long March 5 failure in 2017.

Based on the new DFH-5 satellite design developed by the China Academy of Space Technology — a state-owned satellite manufacture — the Shijian 20 spacecraft will test new technologies to support higher-throughput data links with users on the ground.

Shijian 18 was also intended to test new higher-power ion thrusters. Shijian 20 may carry similar propulsion technology.
 

smooth manifold

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Successful Long March 5 launch paves way for new Chinese space missions
https://spaceflightnow.com/2019/12/...nch-paves-way-for-new-chinese-space-missions/

The third launch of China’s heavy-lift Long March 5 rocket successfully delivered its satellite payload to orbit Friday, validating engine design changes after a failure on the Long March 5’s second flight, and clearing the way for the launch of a Chinese Mars rover and lunar sample return mission in 2020.


The 187-foot-tall (57-meter) rocket, the most powerful in China’s fleet, lifted off from the Wenchang Satellite Launch Center on Hainan Island in southern China at 1245 GMT (7:45 a.m. EST; 8:45 p.m. Beijing time) Friday.

A live video stream on Chinese state television showed the Long March 5 rocket firing into cloudy skies over the coastal launch base in China’s southernmost province.

Ten engines powered the Long March 5 into the sky with nearly 2.4 million pounds of thrust, carrying an experimental communications satellite named Shijian 20 into space.

The launch Friday marked the first flight of a Long March 5 rocket since the launcher’s second mission in July 2017 ended in failure, prompting a two-and-a-half-year grounding and redesign effort.

The successful return-to-flight of the Long March 5 rocket Friday paves the way for China to move forward with plans to launch a pair of ambitious robotic deep space missions using Long March 5 rockets in 2020.

China’s first Mars rover is scheduled for launch on a Long March 5 in mid-2020, and the Chinese Chang’e 5 lunar sample return mission will also require the Long March 5’s lift capability to depart Earth and head for the moon.

Friday’s mission was critical for the Mars and moon missions to launch on their current schedules.

The launch of Chang’e 5 has already been delayed due to the grounding of the Long March 5 after the 2017 failure. China’s Mars mission must launch during a several-week-long period in mid-2020, or else wait until 2022, when Earth and Mars are in the proper positions again to make a direct interplanetary journey possible.

A future variant of the Long March 5 rocket will also launch modules of China’s planned human-rated space station, scheduled to be completed in 2022, adding another layer of importance to Friday’s test launch. The Long March 5B configuration, which is tailored for space station module launches, could debut some time in the second half of 2020 carrying a prototype of China’s next-generation human-rated spaceship on an unpiloted demonstration flight.

The Long March 5 is the heaviest rocket in China’s fleet, and one of the most powerful launcher’s in the world. The Long March 5 can deliver up to 14 metric tons — nearly 31,000 pounds — to geostationary transfer orbit, a popular target orbit for large communications satellites.

Chinese teams loaded the Long March 5 rocket at the Wenchang space base with liquid hydrogen, kerosene and liquid oxygen propellants ahead of the launcher’s blastoff Friday.

Gantry arms on the Long March 5’s 300-foot-tall (92-meter) launch pad tower opened in the final phase of the countdown, and a member of the Chinese launch team crisply called out the final seconds before liftoff.

Sparklers fired underneath the Long March 5 moments before ignition of the core stage’s twin YF-77 hydrogen-fueled engines. Moments later, eight kerosene-fed YF-100 engines ignited on the Long March 5 rocket’s four strap-on boosters to propel the launcher off the pad.

After ascending through clouds, the Long March 5 arced toward the east from the Wenchang launch base. Cameras mounted on-board the rocket showed the four liquid-fueled boosters shutting down their engines and jettisoning to fall into the South China Sea some three minutes into the mission.

The two YF-77 engines on the Long March 5’s core stage burned their supply super-cold liquid hydrogen and liquid oxygen propellants for nearly eight minutes. During the first stage burn, the Long March 5 released its clamshell-like payload fairing once the launcher climbed above the thick, lower layers of the atmosphere.

Two restartable hydrogen-fueled YF-75D engines driving the Long March 5’s second stage fired next in the launch sequence.

The second stage engines performed two firings before deploying the Shijian 20 communications satellite into an elliptical, or egg-shaped, transfer orbit stretching more than 42,000 miles (about 68,000 kilometers) from Earth at its most distant point.

A forward-facing camera on the Long March 5’s second stage showed the Shijian 20 spacecraft separating from the rocket, prompting applause in the launch control center.

The Shijian 20 spacecraft will use its own propulsion system to circularize its orbit at geostationary altitude more than 22,000 miles (nearly 36,000 kilometers) over the equator.

China’s third Long March 5 launch followed the same profile that engineers planned for the second Long March 5 flight in July 2017.

But a first stage engine failure on that mission prevented the rocket from reaching orbit, destroying the Shijian 18 communications satellite. China declared the first Long March 5 launch in November 2016 a success, despite a rocket problem that forced the Long March 5’s Yuanzheng upper stage to burn longer to place the Shijian 17 technology demonstration satellite into its planned orbit.

Investigators traced the cause of the July 2017 launch failure to a turbopump on one of the Long March 5’s two YF-77 first stage engines.

The YF-77 engine failure occurred in a “complex thermal environment” around six minutes after liftoff, leading to an instantaneous loss of thrust, according to Chinese investigators. Engineers redesigned the engine turbine exhaust structure for future Long March 5 missions, forcing officials to scrap engine parts already in stock.

The changes led to a gap of more than two years between the second and third Long March 5 flights. In the interim between launches, engineers conducted test-firings of the modified YF-77 engine to verify the design changes, according to the State Administration for Science, Technology and Industry for National Defense, or SASTIND, the Chinese government agency that oversees the country’s space activities.

The YF-77 engines were developed specifically for the Long March 5.

In addition to introducing changes to resolve the YF-77 engine problem, Chinese engineers simplified some structures on the Long March 5 rocket to make it lighter, increasing the launcher’s carrying capacity, according to the China Academy of Launch Vehicle Technology, the country’s lead state-owned contractor for the Long March rocket family.

The Shijian 20 satellite launched Friday will replace the Shijian 18 satellite lost on the Long March 5 failure in 2017.

Based on the new DFH-5 satellite design developed by the China Academy of Space Technology — a state-owned satellite manufacture — the Shijian 20 spacecraft will test new technologies to support higher-throughput data links with users on the ground.

Shijian 18 was also intended to test new higher-power ion thrusters. Shijian 20 may carry similar propulsion technology.
attach a video............
 

xizhimen

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China decouples from US in space with 2020 'GPS' completion
70% of Chinese smartphones now compatible with Beidou

DECEMBER 28, 2019 03:03 JST


A model of the Beidou Satellite Navigation System: China is offering the services of Beidou to countries in ASEAN, South Asia, Africa and East Europe, creating a new bloc of friends. © Xinhua


BEIJING -- China announced Friday that it is just months away from completing its Beidou satellite-based positioning system as it moves to reduce its reliance on America's GPS in both in telecommunications and for its military.

The final two satellites will be launched by June, completing the 35-satellite network, Ran Chengqi, spokesperson for the Beidou Navigation Satellite System, told reporters in Beijing. The number of satellites in operation will trump the roughly 30 used by the U.S.-owned Global Positioning System.

From modern farming to smart ports to a text messaging service, China is trying to build an ecosystem independent of the GPS and open it to Southeast Asia, South Asia, Africa and Eastern Europe.


This effort pushes decoupling between Washington and Beijing, which are poised to enter year three of a trade war, to the final frontier of space.

Over 70% of Chinese smartphones are equipped to tap into Beidou's positioning services, Ran said. The system also plays a role in fifth-generation wireless communications, an area where China's Huawei Technologies is in the vanguard of technological development.

"The integration of Beidou and 5G is an important sign on the path toward China's development of information technology," he said.

Named after the Chinese term for the Big Dipper constellation, Beidou now has related products exported to about 120 trading partners, up from roughly 90 at the end of last year. These exports mostly overlap with President Xi Jinping's continent-spanning Belt and Road infrastructure initiative.

Beidou "has entered into a new era of global service," Ran said, "benefiting ASEAN, South Asia, Eastern Europe, West Asia and Africa in precision farming, digital construction and smart port construction."

Services will be enhanced by the end of next year, Ran added. For example, the level of positioning accuracy will improve from within 5 meters to within centimeters, an advance that will aid search-and-rescue missions.

Such accuracy is also crucial for self-driving vehicle development, a sector supported by the government. Both Beidou and 5G will be employed by self-driving buses that will soon begin operation in the city of Wuhan.

Beidou will also differentiate itself from GPS by supporting communication through its constellation of satellites.

Space is once of the priority areas of Beijing's "Made in China 2025" plan for boosting self-reliance in vital technologies. By 2030, China aims to become a "space power" alongside the U.S. and Russia. The launch of a Martian probe is set for as early as next year, followed by the completion of a Chinese space station around 2022.

The development of China's space program has moved in tandem with the country's military buildup. Although Beijing and Washington have agreed to a tariff cease fire as part of a "phase one" trade deal, China's efforts to project power into space look likely to remain a source of tension in the bilateral relationship.

China has launched 53 Beidou satellites since 2000, including those no longer in operation. The navigational system began worldwide services in late 2018. Beidou started offering positioning services to private-sector companies in late November of this year.

The economic scale of services and production of goods tied to Beidou will grow to 400 billion yuan ($57 billion) in 2020, according to Chinese media.

Beijing aims to expand the system worldwide. China and Russia have allied on satellite positioning. Chinese officials are also pouring resources into collaborating with global organizations representing the airline industry and other sectors.

https://asia.nikkei.com/Business/Ch...les-from-US-in-space-with-2020-GPS-completion
 

smooth manifold

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Thanks for making it sticky!

All Chinese Orbital Launches as of 31 Dec 2019

CASC Long March
323 launches
15 failures
success rate 95.4%

CASC Smart Dragon
1 launch
0 faiure
success rate 100%

CASC Storm (decommissioned in 1982)
9 launches
4 failures
success rate 56%

CASIC Kuaizhou
9 launches
0 failure
success rate 100%

CASIC Kaituozhe
4 launches
3 failures
success rate 25%

Landspace Zhuque
1 launch
1 failure
success rate 0%

iSpace Hyperbola
1 launch
0 failure
success rate 100%

Onespace OS-M
1 launch
1 failure
success rate 0%
 

smooth manifold

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$1.4 billion(¥~10 billion Yuan) investment in Landspace infrastructure project launched today. sorry for my poor translation.

Landspace has probably discarded its failed solid rocket ZQ-1 and now fully focusing on development of its medium lift methalox ZQ-2 launcher.





machine translate:

This morning, with the opening of the project by Zhang Bing, the secretary of the Jiaxing Municipal Party Committee, the Jiaxing Blue Arrow(Landspace) Space Center, which is located in the Aerospace Industrial Park of Jiaxing Port District, has officially started construction, which marked the development of the aerospace industry in Jiaxing Port District. This is another important achievement for Jiaxing Port District to seize the major historical opportunity of the integrated development of the Yangtze River Delta.

Jiaxing Blue Arrow(Landspace) Space Center is one of the four tens of billions of projects this year that the port area has attracted in accordance with the development positioning of the aerospace industry. The project is mainly based on the development of new liquid rocket products, creating a top aerospace industry base in the entire industry chain that integrates design simulation, test and detection, and intelligent manufacturing. Relying on the aerospace industry park, the project will build a regionally integrated innovation chain and industrial chain, help Jiaxing Port Area fully integrate into the Yangtze River Delta regional integrated development, and build a China commercial aerospace development demonstration zone with international competitiveness.

Blue Arrow(Landspace) Group Chairman Wang Jianmeng said that Blue Arrow(Landspace) Aerospace will give full play to the gathering role of carrier rockets in the upstream and downstream of the industrial chain, with the goal of creating an aerospace entire industrial chain gathering place, adhere to innovation-driven development, science and technology lead development, and accelerate the promotion of Jiaxing Blue Arrow(Landspace) The construction of the aerospace center has made new and greater contributions in the great journey of achieving the dream of aerospace and national power.

"Negotiate that year, sign a contract that year, start construction that year". After the location of Jiaxing Blue Arrow(Landspace) Space Center was landed in the port area, the two sides fully connected, sincerely communicated, and advanced efficiently with the spirit of "good morning one day", and once again refreshed the new speed of the port area for the promotion of 10 billion major industrial projects.

Since the beginning of this year, under the strong leadership of the Municipal Party Committee and Municipal Government, Jiaxing Port District has focused on the main line of high-quality development, and has always taken the lead to implement the first strategy. Recruiting and attracting strong decision-making and deployment, vigorously attracting high-quality green projects, and vigorously promote the development of the aerospace industry.

In the next step, the Jiaxing Port Area will continue to deepen the "run once" reform, give full play to the role of "enterprise service through train", set up special classes to provide full service, and make every effort to promote the early completion of the project, early commissioning, and early results. "The first liquid rocket in Zhejiang Province" offered a hundred years of party building and will take this as an opportunity to continue to grasp the implementation and work hard to build the "best characteristic port" of the Yangtze River Delta sea and river transport and the "best industry to drive regional innovation and development" Port "," Best Cooperation Port "serving Ningbo Zhoushan Port and Shanghai Port, and" The Most Beautiful and Harmonious Ecological New Port City "on the northern shore of Hangzhou Bay, to create a hub-type central city in the core area of the Yangtze River Delta, a future-oriented, innovative new city, and internationalization The high-quality Jiangnan water town cultural city, an open and coordinated high-quality development demonstration site, and a bright pearl on the north shore of the Hangzhou Bay in the Yangtze River Delta city group contribute more port power. (Photo courtesy of Jiaxing Port District)

http://zjnews.zjol.com.cn/zjnews/jxnews/201912/t20191229_11522804.shtml
 

smooth manifold

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$1.4 billion(¥~10 billion Yuan) investment in Landspace infrastructure project launched today. sorry for my poor translation.

Landspace has probably discarded its failed solid rocket ZQ-1 and now fully focusing on development of its medium lift methalox ZQ-2 launcher.
Honestly speaking, those private solid launchers even if they're successful can never compete against the national teams such as Kuaizhou and Smart Dragon.
 

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