CHINESE Medium Altitude Long Endurance DRONES

Illusive

Senior Member
Joined
Jun 20, 2010
Messages
2,892
Likes
3,566
Country flag
oh? again, it need your own effort to 'collect information'...CH-3/4, Winglong-I are the 'past'...nowadays, try the keyword 'Winglong-II' /‘CH-5’and 'UAE', 'Saudi', etc...lol...

middle-east market is the direct impetus of these new ,bigger ,more capable UAV projects...and the orders are big as well.

eg.
----------------
UAE revealed as Wing Loong II launch customer
Christopher Biggers, Washington, DC - Jane's Defence Weekly
26 January 2018

View attachment 35812

The United Arab Emirates (UAE) air force has almost certainly acquired the AVIC Wing Loong II medium-altitude, long-endurance unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV). Satellite imagery shows three UAVs matching the Wing Loong II’s dimensions at the UAE’s remote Qusahwirah Air Base near the border with Oman and Saudi Arabia on 22 October 2017.

According to AVIC, the strike-capable Wing Loong II has a length of 11 m and a wingspan of 20.5 m. The dimensions and capabilities of the platform compare closely with the US-built MQ-9 Reaper. The UAE does not possess the MQ-9, nor does Jane’s have knowledge of foreign MQ-9s operating from Qusahwirah, suggesting the UAVs visible in the imagery are Wing Loong IIs.

China’s Xinhua news agency reported on 28 February 2017 that AVIC had secured a major export order for the Wing Loong II from an unidentified country even before the aircraft had taken its first flight, which happened a day earlier.

The report gave no indication when the customer would receive its first UAVs, but AVIC announced earlier in January that intensive testing during the previous 10 months had shown that the system “has met user requirements and possesses full operational capability”. This involved simultaneously controlling two aircraft from the same ground station.

Never publicly acknowledged by the UAE, Qusahwirah Air Base has been a mystery since Google Earth released the first satellite imagery of the expanded facility.
Haha it's good time to sell it to the Arabian sheikh who would buy every possible military equipment they can in the market, from the "Iranian threat". Hopefully they aren't disappointed like the Jordanians.
 

Armand2REP

CHINI EXPERT
Senior Member
Joined
Dec 17, 2009
Messages
13,813
Likes
6,552
Country flag
oh? again, it need your own effort to 'collect information'...CH-3/4, Winglong-I are the 'past'...nowadays, try the keyword 'Winglong-II' /‘CH-5’and 'UAE', 'Saudi', etc...lol...

middle-east market is the direct impetus of these new ,bigger ,more capable UAV projects...and the orders are big as well.
According to the human rights groups the UAE is on preorder for the first armed Safran Patroller drone. The order wasn't announced due to the ongoing sensitivity of arm sales over the war in Yemen. Egypt will also be acquiring the armed version of the Patroller so it looks like Chinese UAVs are getting replaced.

https://orientxxi.info/magazine/la-france-partie-prenante-de-la-guerre-contre-le-yemen,2662

We could have cut China off at the pass if we had not been so sensitive to arming our drones but the Arabs demand a strike capability which has propelled early success of Chinese drones.
 

rockdog

Regular Member
Joined
Dec 29, 2010
Messages
803
Likes
423
Country flag
Now don't try to post those BS video else I will post full article of Chinese media on J 15.
If you checkout this context, who mentioned J15 on this Drone thread...

BTW, who cares what do you think about J15...
 

HariPrasad-1

Senior Member
Joined
Jan 7, 2016
Messages
6,143
Likes
9,253
Country flag

rockdog

Regular Member
Joined
Dec 29, 2010
Messages
803
Likes
423
Country flag
Do not expose your reeducation camp education again and again. This is a testimony of quality of Chinese weapon by Chinese media.
Do not expose your low caste education again and again. This is a thread of drone of Chinese weapon by Defence Forum India.
 

HariPrasad-1

Senior Member
Joined
Jan 7, 2016
Messages
6,143
Likes
9,253
Country flag
Do not expose your low caste education again and again. This is a thread of drone of Chinese weapon by Defence Forum India.
Hey Joker, I am exposing Chinese technology. You hypes your shitty weapon and it proves to be garbage in the end.
 

rockdog

Regular Member
Joined
Dec 29, 2010
Messages
803
Likes
423
Country flag
American National Intrest website
nationalinterest.org

Forget Stealth Fighters or Aircraft Carriers: China Will Beat America with This
https://nationalinterest.org/blog/b...rcraft-carriers-china-will-beat-america-62987

What’s particularly interesting about a Chinese drone swarm is China’s predominance in drone production. Chinese manufacturer DJI makes nearly 80 percent of the drones used in the United States and Canada (U.S. authorities recently warned these robots could be stealing data from their users). Such a solid manufacturing base puts Beijing in a strong position to build large numbers of small attack drones.

China has a history of overwhelming its enemies with sheer numbers of troops.

Now, China may have a modern iteration on that tactic: swarms of tiny rocket-armed helicopter drones that will swamp enemy forces like angry bees.

“China’s domestically developed helicopter drones carrying proximity explosive mortar shells, grenade launchers and machine guns can now form swarms and engage in coordinated strikes,” according to Chinese newspaper Global Times, citing a statement by the Guangdong-based Zhuhai Ziyan company, which makes unmanned aerial vehicles. The system was also displayed at a recent Turkish defense trade show.

“With a single push of a button, the drones can autonomously take off, avoiding colliding in the air and finding their way to their designated target,” Global Times said. “Once they receive an order to attack, they will engage the target autonomously in a coordinated manner. Upon finishing a mission, the system will lead the drones back to base and land automatically. The operator does not need to expose himself or herself in a dangerous frontline as the drones can easily be controlled remotely.”

Up to ten heli-drones can be assembled into a swarm, with Artificial Intelligence guiding and coordinating the group. “The 10 drones can be a combination of different types, including those that can drop proximity explosive mortar shells, while others can carry grenade launchers, or make suicide attacks,” said Global Times.

Zhuhai Ziyan offers multiple types of armed mini-drones. In 2018, it unveiled the Blowfish A2, which resembles a camel with a rotor stuck into its hump. The six-foot-long, two-foot-high drone has a speed of 130 kilometers (81 miles) per hour. It can be armed with 60-millimeter mortar shells and or a 40-millimeter grenade launcher.

“Other helicopter drones include the Infiltrator, which can launch rockets and missiles, and the Parus S1, which sacrifices itself to blow up the target,” Global Times said. Zhuhai Ziyan is now working on the Blowfish A3, slightly larger than the A2 and armed with “multiple types of machine guns and features a different aerodynamic design allowing the gun to shoot at more angles mid-flight.”


Zhuhai Ziyan claims to have had “numerous inquiries from multiple foreign companies,” suggesting that the company is willing to sell or license its technology.

China is hardly the first nation to explore swarm attacks by small drones. America’s DARPA research agency is working on Offensive Swarm-Enabled Tactics, or OFFSET, which envisions humans as drone resource managers, using a video game-like virtual reality to control formations of hundreds of small unmanned aircraft during urban battles. A 2018 test of DARPA’s Collaborative Operations in Denied Environments (CODE) demonstrated how a drone swarm, when communications with its human controllers were disrupted, could still find and strike targets simply by the AI following the intent of the mission plan.


Russia also has experience with drone swarms—but as a target. In 2018, a gaggle of small unmanned aircraft, armed with explosives, were launched by Syrian rebels at a Russian airbase in Syria. Russia claimed to have shot down seven and hijacked their radio links to take control of another six.

What’s particularly interesting about a Chinese drone swarm is China’s predominance in drone production. Chinese manufacturer DJI makes nearly 80 percent of the drones used in the United States and Canada (U.S. authorities recently warned these robots could be stealing data from their users). Such a solid manufacturing base puts Beijing in a strong position to build large numbers of small attack drones.
 

rockdog

Regular Member
Joined
Dec 29, 2010
Messages
803
Likes
423
Country flag
American National Intrest website
nationalinterest.org

Forget Stealth Fighters or Aircraft Carriers: China Will Beat America with This
https://nationalinterest.org/blog/b...rcraft-carriers-china-will-beat-america-62987

What’s particularly interesting about a Chinese drone swarm is China’s predominance in drone production. Chinese manufacturer DJI makes nearly 80 percent of the drones used in the United States and Canada (U.S. authorities recently warned these robots could be stealing data from their users). Such a solid manufacturing base puts Beijing in a strong position to build large numbers of small attack drones.

China has a history of overwhelming its enemies with sheer numbers of troops.

Now, China may have a modern iteration on that tactic: swarms of tiny rocket-armed helicopter drones that will swamp enemy forces like angry bees.

“China’s domestically developed helicopter drones carrying proximity explosive mortar shells, grenade launchers and machine guns can now form swarms and engage in coordinated strikes,” according to Chinese newspaper Global Times, citing a statement by the Guangdong-based Zhuhai Ziyan company, which makes unmanned aerial vehicles. The system was also displayed at a recent Turkish defense trade show.

“With a single push of a button, the drones can autonomously take off, avoiding colliding in the air and finding their way to their designated target,” Global Times said. “Once they receive an order to attack, they will engage the target autonomously in a coordinated manner. Upon finishing a mission, the system will lead the drones back to base and land automatically. The operator does not need to expose himself or herself in a dangerous frontline as the drones can easily be controlled remotely.”

Up to ten heli-drones can be assembled into a swarm, with Artificial Intelligence guiding and coordinating the group. “The 10 drones can be a combination of different types, including those that can drop proximity explosive mortar shells, while others can carry grenade launchers, or make suicide attacks,” said Global Times.

Zhuhai Ziyan offers multiple types of armed mini-drones. In 2018, it unveiled the Blowfish A2, which resembles a camel with a rotor stuck into its hump. The six-foot-long, two-foot-high drone has a speed of 130 kilometers (81 miles) per hour. It can be armed with 60-millimeter mortar shells and or a 40-millimeter grenade launcher.

“Other helicopter drones include the Infiltrator, which can launch rockets and missiles, and the Parus S1, which sacrifices itself to blow up the target,” Global Times said. Zhuhai Ziyan is now working on the Blowfish A3, slightly larger than the A2 and armed with “multiple types of machine guns and features a different aerodynamic design allowing the gun to shoot at more angles mid-flight.”


Zhuhai Ziyan claims to have had “numerous inquiries from multiple foreign companies,” suggesting that the company is willing to sell or license its technology.

China is hardly the first nation to explore swarm attacks by small drones. America’s DARPA research agency is working on Offensive Swarm-Enabled Tactics, or OFFSET, which envisions humans as drone resource managers, using a video game-like virtual reality to control formations of hundreds of small unmanned aircraft during urban battles. A 2018 test of DARPA’s Collaborative Operations in Denied Environments (CODE) demonstrated how a drone swarm, when communications with its human controllers were disrupted, could still find and strike targets simply by the AI following the intent of the mission plan.


Russia also has experience with drone swarms—but as a target. In 2018, a gaggle of small unmanned aircraft, armed with explosives, were launched by Syrian rebels at a Russian airbase in Syria. Russia claimed to have shot down seven and hijacked their radio links to take control of another six.

What’s particularly interesting about a Chinese drone swarm is China’s predominance in drone production. Chinese manufacturer DJI makes nearly 80 percent of the drones used in the United States and Canada (U.S. authorities recently warned these robots could be stealing data from their users). Such a solid manufacturing base puts Beijing in a strong position to build large numbers of small attack drones.
 

rockdog

Regular Member
Joined
Dec 29, 2010
Messages
803
Likes
423
Country flag
US Air Force plans contract for DJI unmanned aerial vehicles

https://www.janes.com/article/89583/us-air-force-plans-contract-for-dji-unmanned-aerial-vehicles

Key Points
  • The US Air Force plans to buy DJI quadcopter UAVs
  • The service likely plans to use these aircraft for counter-UAV investigation and experiments because DJI dominates the consumer UAV market
The US Air Force (USAF) is planning to award China's DJI a firm-fixed-price contract to acquire a variety of the company's consumer unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs), according to a notice posted on the Federal Business Opportunities (FBO) website.

The service plans to acquire six Phantom 4 aircraft, five Phantom 4 Pro models, and six DJI Mavic Pros - all quadcopter aircraft. The UAVs are for the 11th Security Forces Squadron at Joint Base Andrews in Maryland.


 

rockdog

Regular Member
Joined
Dec 29, 2010
Messages
803
Likes
423
Country flag
Let’s Talk About The Photo of Chinese-Built “Wing Loong” Drone (Likely Operated by UAE) over Libya.

https://theaviationist.com/2019/07/...g-ii-drone-likely-operated-by-uae-over-libya/

An interesting photo of a heavily-armed Chinese-built “Wing Loong” remotely piloted aircraft (RPA) re-surfaced on social media on Monday, July 1 after being initially posted on June 30, then deleted, as it flew over Libya. The aircraft has been attributed, although not confirmed, to be operated by the United Arab Emirates.

The fascinating photo first came to our attention from the definitive resource for Chinese military intelligence in the social media space, Modern Chinese Warplanes on Facebook. Administered by author and subject matter expert Andreas Rupprecht, the photo made its way from the Twitter page of French aviation reporter Harry Boone, @towersight on Twitter. The photo is reported to have first appeared on June 30 and showed the aircraft flying over Tripoli.


Weapons on board the claimed United Arab Emirates Wing Loong drone over Tripoli, Libya on June 30, 2019. (Photo: Harry Boone @towersight on Twitter)

If you look closely at the photo, you can see this Wing Loong, also possibly referred to as a Chengdu Pterodactyl I, is heavily armed with a payload of what appears to be eight air-to-surface missiles under its wings. The angle of the sun illuminating the aircraft in the photo suggest the photo is either from the evening hours or from morning as the aircraft is brightly lit primarily from the side. The Wing Loong is likely carrying the Chinese Blue Arrow-7 air-to-surface missile, or BA-7. According to analyst and author Robert Wall as published in Aviation Week on June 12, 2012, “The semi-active laser weapon is designed for an effective range of 2 km to 7 km. It uses a tandem, high-explosive anti-tank warhead.”

A May 2, 2019 report by analyst and reporter Tom Kington on the Defense News website said that the United Arab Emirates has been using the Chinese-built Wing Loong RPAs to conduct precision strikes against Islamic militants in support of Libyan Gen. Khalifa Haftar. In his May 2, 2019 report, Kington wrote that, “Aircraft seen circling over the Libyan capital during nighttime raids in recent days were likely Chinese Wing Loong II drones operated by the United Arab Emirates, which is backing Haftar’s bid to overthrow the United Nations-backed government in the city, analysts claimed.”

...

The new Wing Loong photo and the aircraft’s operations over Libya are interesting because they add to the continuing story of China’s expansion of defense export in the region. Reporter Tom Kington quoted Jalel Harchaoui of the Clingendael Institute in the Netherlands as saying, “Buying drones from the U.S. takes time, is expensive and there is accountability, but buying Chinese drones is now cheap, fast and no one breathes down your neck — the floodgates are open.” Mr. Harchaoui has been a research fellow of the Clingendael Institute’s Conflict Research Unit since February, 2019. Harchaoui is a subject matter and research expert on Libya, including security and economic subject in the war-torn country.

Other interesting media that has surfaced recently of the Wing Loong’s operations include a little-viewed but high quality video on YouTube of what is attributed to be a Wing Loong RPA being shot down by Houthi militants over the northern Yemeni province of Saada on April 19, 2019. At the time it was downed, the report published in Southfront.org said the Wing Loong was carrying two AKD-10 laser-guided, air-to-surface missiles.
 

Armand2REP

CHINI EXPERT
Senior Member
Joined
Dec 17, 2009
Messages
13,813
Likes
6,552
Country flag
Chinese UCAV breaks down at Russian Airshow Chinese
Wing Loong II UCAV (Unmanned Combat Ariel Vehicle) landing gears broke down at the MAKS 2019 Airshow without any proper reason. The Chinese officials blamed local Russian kids for this incident.



:laugh::rofl::laugh::rofl::laugh::rofl::laugh:.......................... payload is 50kg.
 

Global Defence

Articles

Top