China Won’t ‘Sit With Arms Crossed’ If India Sells Missiles To Vietnam: Chinese Media

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Seems that we got an extension of previous thread.:biggrin2:
http://defenceforumindia.com/forum/...an-do-the-same-says-chinese-state-medi.78156/
@Chinmoy @ezsasa @hit&run @sayareakd @IndianHawk
China Won’t ‘Sit With Arms Crossed’ If India Sells Missiles To Vietnam: Chinese Media

Any moves by India to step-up military ties with Vietnam to counter China will create “disturbance” in the region and Beijing will not “sit with its arms crossed”, state media said today, taking exception to a report that New Delhi plans to sell surface-to-air Akash missiles to Hanoi.
“If the Indian government genuinely treats its enhancement of military relations with Vietnam as a strategic arrangement or even revenge against Beijing, it will only create disturbances in the region and China will hardly sit with its arms crossed,” an op-ed in the Global Times said, highlighting China’s concerns over reports of supply of Akash missiles (surface-to- air missile) system to Vietnam.
The supply of missiles was supposed to be a “normal arms sale, yet was portrayed by the Indian media as a response “to counter the Chinese threat”, it said, referring to reports that the missile sale was in response to China blocking India’s move to become member of the Nuclear Suppliers Group (NSG) and to block a United Nations ban on Jaish-e-Mohammed terrorist Masood Azhar.
“There should be no dispute when India decides to intensify its military ties with Vietnam, a crucial member of ASEAN as well as a key pillar of India’s Act East Policy. Yet such ties should be built for the sake of peace and stability in the region, rather than stirring up troubles or anxiety for others.”
“However, when India and Vietnam are in talks about possible sales, New Delhi seems to keep taking a sneak peak at Beijing as if the deal is stealthily aimed at China,” it said.
Global Times, which is part of the ruling Communist Party of China’s official group of publications, has been carrying articles targeting India almost on daily basis with aggressive and hostile language.
While striking threatening posture against India over its increasingly close-knit ties with Vietnam, another article in the same daily today warned Hanoi that it must improve ties with China notwithstanding the South China Sea dispute.
“Aside from its endeavour to improve relations with China, Hanoi must deal with rising nationalism at home intermingled with anti-China and anti-Communism sentiment at times, which is adverse to the CPV’s (ruling Communist Party of Vietnam) leadership itself, as well as the development of China-Vietnam relations.
Screw communists, make Democracy everywhere.:D
“Vietnam’s leaders must have realised the importance of the issue and they have spared no efforts in developing cooperation with China in politics, economy and culture,” it said, referring to the visit of Nguyen Phu Trong, the general secretary of CPV, to Beijing starting tomorrow during which he is scheduled to have talks with top Chinese leaders.
Vietnam, along with Philippines, Malaysia, Brunei and Taiwan, questions Beijing’s claims over almost all of the South China Sea, and China has been seeking to pacify Hanoi, highlighting the fraternal ties between the Communist Party of China and the Communist Party of Vietnam.
The article on India said “due to geopolitical factors, some nations have been cozying up to India over the years, which to a large extent contributed to India’s fruitful development”.
“New Delhi understands that the best strategy for itself is to continue its collaboration with all parties, instead of picking a side and turning hostile to one another. Otherwise, it might not only turn others’ troubles to its own puzzles, but also suffer enormous losses of development opportunities.”
“During a short visit Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi paid to Vietnam in September last year, an expert in India voiced that India can make the same statement in China’s backyard that they do in ours. Yet Vietnam is not a backyard to any country. Such a statement only mirrors India’s outdated diplomatic mindset.”
“India has a dream to grow into a great power. But under today’s international circumstances, it will be extraordinarily hard to achieve the goal on its own. What India needs is more pragmatic cooperation with other countries,” the report said.
“Beijing always emphasises the importance of cooperation with New Delhi and hopes the latter will join the Belt and Road initiative which will help promote the country’s infrastructure construction, improve connectivity within the region and may even turn into a push to solve the India-Pakistan contradictions,” it said.
“It is hoped that the hype in the Indian media does not represent the country’s government. There are divergences between Beijing and New Delhi, yet there are more common interests that await the two to explore,” it added.
In brief,

  1. Vietnam is a small nation, we are not concerned about it.
  2. India's military ties with Vietnam are normal, nothing to worry.
  3. It is not any response due to NSG snub or Masood Azhar case.
  4. No, it will create imbalance in region we are very much concerned about it.
  5. India must not try to put head up otherwise mighty communists will crush India (usual rant).
  6. India is doing that all motivated by NSG & Azhar rows, India must be pragmatic.
  7. If India doesn't stop, we won't also (as if we are).
Usual commie flip flop.:confused1:
 
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once said (arrow directs towards original post):

Wanted to respond comment in better way than, I previously did.
From some paki :dude:
(Ignore this bhikhmanga and catch my message)


It's exactly my point friend, wars are never fought one sided. And new government is at least more assertive (don't let me remind Prahar case if any supporter of INC). You do become more assertive, won't you be pushed back?

India wants to get masood azhar. At what cost? Waving tail for China? Seriously...

Tail waving, even it may for obeying it, what self respect would be left for us. I say let them not do. Do our worse, they will either admit or they may keep hanging. India may never be able to catch azhar, India may not be able to join any organization like NSG before it gains anymore political power.

But such posture give me a good sleep at night, don't know about you guys.
 

IndianHawk

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. India may never be able to catch azhar, India may not be able to join any organization like NSG before it gains anymore political power.

But such posture give me a good sleep at night, don't know about you guys.
You're spot on.
Power is no guarantee of getting everything sorted. USA can not punish china for trade cheats despite military prowess. China can't take Taiwan despite all its might .

For India to be a truly great power it must be able to disrupt international order at will.

Who gives a damn about NSG but India is capable of forcing 45 nations to sit and talk over its agenda. That is a testimony of growing strength.

Regarding azhar china is only disgracing itself while it keeps whining over dalai lama meeting anyone.

It is the Chinese that need to learn to be graceful in there behaviour the act like a petty small island :facepalm:
 

IndianHawk

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Let's head towards comments

Bhikhariyon ki fauj hai yeh qaum! :lol:

Underestimated or even estimated?:dude:
Every single weapon contributes to economic collapse of al-bakistan. Let's up the ante and force Pakistan to buy more weapons. After surgical strikes they lost 3-4 fighter jets in two months. Let's keep repeating it.
 

airtel

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A friend in need – India’s arms sales to Vietnam make sense

The growing relationship between New Delhi and Hanoi is one that offers strategic advantages to both sides. How China reacts remains to be seen.
By Helen Clark January 11, 2017 6:06 PM (UTC+8)

An Indian soldier salutes as he rides an Akash air defence system during India's Republic Day parade in New Delhi on January 26, 2016. Photo: AFP / Roberto SCHMIDT
India is poised to sell its sophisticated Akash missile defense system to Vietnam, the latest development in a broad strategic relationship that has grown rapidly in recent years and added a new twist to the spiraling power contest in the South China Sea. The talks, consistent with India’s ambition to be a major arms supplier, were first reported this week by the Times of India.

The medium range surface-to-air missile, produced by New Delhi’s Ministry of Defense, can target aircraft, helicopters and drones up to 25 kilometers away at a time when China is building up aerial defenses over fixtures it claims in the contested maritime area. India has also offered to sell its Varunastra anti-submarine torpedoes to Vietnam amid heightened tensions with China.

Vietnam has steadily built up its military capabilities over the past decade, including a surge in new foreign procurements with applicability in the hotly contested South China Sea. Beijing reacted with irritation to last year’s lifting of the US’ long-held arms embargo against Vietnam. It has not yet responded to reports of the proposed Akash missile system sale.


Defense cooperation has been central to bilateral ties since 2007, when India and Vietnam signed a broad memorandum of understanding on training, exchanges, and visits. In September last year, the two sides elevated ties from a “strategic” to a “comprehensive strategic” partnership, making India one of Vietnam’s top strategic allies. Since 2011, Vietnam has doubled to 15 the number of global strategic partnerships it engages in a bid to diversify its post-Cold War diplomacy.

The pending missile system sale comes to light after earlier talks on Vietnam’s bid to procure the Brahmos short-range supersonic missile system, produced by an Indo-Russian joint venture, stalled without Russia’s agreement. The Brahmos is known to be the world’s fastest anti-ship cruise missile in operation. India and Russia plan to develop a new generation of the missile capable of hitting targets at a 600-kilometer range.

Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi has put wind into the sails of Indo-Vietnamese defense cooperation. In October 2014, when then-Prime Minister Nguyen Tan Dung visited India, Modi said: “Our defense cooperation with Vietnam is among our most important ones. India remains committed to the modernization of Vietnam’s defense and security forces.”



Ties were further enhanced in a 12-point Joint Vision Statement, headlined by a US$500 million line of credit for Vietnam defense procurements from Indian producers, during Modi’s visit to Hanoi in September. That line of credit was boosted fivefold from the US$100 million extended in 2014. Vietnam is a useful and strategic client for India as it looks to increase its weapons exports to US$2 billion in coming years.

Bilateral defense education and training programs are also growing, as witnessed in rising Indian assistance to the Information Technology and Foreign Languages Training Center at the Signal Officers Training School in Nha Trang. The central coast town is near the strategic Cam Ranh naval facility, where Russia maintains residual influence from the Cold War era and the United States is now known to desire special access.

India has agreed to train Vietnamese pilots on Russian-built SU-30s and Sukhoi fighter jets and currently trains Vietnamese submarine operators on Russia-produced Kilo-class submarines. Vietnam purchased six of the vessels from Russia in 2009, the last of which was delivered in 2016. There is also an agreement on the peaceful exploration of space, including over satellites which India will launch from Vietnam to oversee sections of the South China Sea.


India’s Prime Minister Narendra Modi (left) shakes hands with Vietnam’s Communist Party Secretary General Nguyen Phu Trong during a meeting at the VCP headquarters in Hanoi on September 3, 2016. Photo: AFP / Hoang Dinh Nam
As long time clients of Russian arms, India and Vietnam already share a high level of force interoperability. Previously, Vietnam would even send Russian-made parts to India for repairs, as they were done more cheaply there than in Russia. Both nations have also undertaken significant force upgrades in recent years. From 2011 to 2015, Vietnam was the world’s eighth-largest weapons importer, according to a report from Stockholm International Peace Research Institute.

India’s arms sales to Vietnam are part of its ‘Look East’ policy, New Delhi’s pivot-like policy toward Southeast Asia. The Akash missile system sale, if completed, may open the way for greater Indian access to Cam Ranh for purposes of maintenance and training. India is also involved in oil and gas exploration in the South China Sea, including areas that Vietnam claims. An Indian presence at Cam Ranh would be a potential deterrent to China interfering in such exploration operations, analysts say.

Though China obviously factors into Indo-Vietnamese defense cooperation, Hanoi is implementing a wider hedging strategy. India’s Non-Aligned Movement background and growing regional muscle make it a valuable ally outside of US-China competition for influence, as well as the uneasy non-alliance of China and Russia. How China reacts to India’s rising military involvement in the South China Sea, however, is yet to be seen.

Helen Clark, a former foreign correspondent based in Hanoi, has covered Vietnamese politics for over a decade. She wrote previously for Asia Times under the pseudonym M. Goonan.


http://www.atimes.com/article/friend-need-indias-arms-sales-vietnam-make-sense/
 

captonjohn

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This is a good move and India should continue with such actions. Tit for Tat is the only way to deal with China. If you harm us, we harm you.
 

Nicky G

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They'll pressurize the Vietnamese to back off. Will be interesting to see how this plays out.
 

captonjohn

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They'll pressurize the Vietnamese to back off. Will be interesting to see how this plays out.
Pressurizing VIetnam would work in reverse direction. I believe they would play good cop bad cop. Some incentive with pressure.

I highly doubt Vietnam would go with Chinese pressure.
 

Nicky G

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Pressurizing VIetnam would work in reverse direction. I believe they would play good cop bad cop. Some incentive with pressure.

I highly doubt Vietnam would go with Chinese pressure.
Their leader is meeitng 11 ping pong (hope you got that) today. I am skeptical about what's likely to happen. They have been for long interested in Brhamos, let's see how it goes.
 

1971ftw

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Lol chinkis are like spoiled rich kids , if you play with fire you will get burnt .
 

airtel

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Why China Should Fear India's Arms Sales to Vietnam (Think South China Sea)

Helen Clark

January 11, 2017


India is poised to sell its sophisticated Akash missile defense system to Vietnam, the latest development in a broad strategic relationship that has grown rapidly in recent years and added a new twist to the spiraling power contest in the South China Sea. The talks, consistent with India’s ambition to be a major arms supplier, were first reported this week by the Times of India.

The medium range surface-to-air missile, produced by New Delhi’s Ministry of Defense, can target aircraft, helicopters and drones up to 25 kilometers away at a time when China is building up aerial defenses over fixtures it claims in the contested maritime area. India has also offered to sell its Varunastra anti-submarine torpedoes to Vietnam amid heightened tensions with China.

Vietnam has steadily built up its military capabilities over the past decade, including a surge in new foreign procurements with applicability in the hotly contested South China Sea. Beijing reacted with irritation to last year’s lifting of the US’ long-held arms embargo against Vietnam. It has not yet responded to reports of the proposed Akash missile system sale.

Defense cooperation has been central to bilateral ties since 2007, when India and Vietnam signed a broad memorandum of understanding on training, exchanges, and visits. In September last year, the two sides elevated ties from a “strategic” to a “comprehensive strategic” partnership, making India one of Vietnam’s top strategic allies. Since 2011, Vietnam has doubled to 15 the number of global strategic partnerships it engages in a bid to diversify its post-Cold War diplomacy.

The pending missile system sale comes to light after earlier talks on Vietnam’s bid to procure the Brahmos short-range supersonic missile system, produced by an Indo-Russian joint venture, stalled without Russia’s agreement. The Brahmos is known to be the world’s fastest anti-ship cruise missile in operation. India and Russia plan to develop a new generation of the missile capable of hitting targets at a 600-kilometer range.

Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi has put wind into the sails of Indo-Vietnamese defense cooperation. In October 2014, when then-Prime Minister Nguyen Tan Dung visited India, Modi said: “Our defense cooperation with Vietnam is among our most important ones. India remains committed to the modernization of Vietnam’s defense and security forces.”

Ties were further enhanced in a 12-point Joint Vision Statement, headlined by a US$500 million line of credit for Vietnam defense procurements from Indian producers, during Modi’s visit to Hanoi in September. That line of credit was boosted fivefold from the US$100 million extended in 2014. Vietnam is a useful and strategic client for India as it looks to increase its weapons exports to US$2 billion in coming years.

Bilateral defense education and training programs are also growing, as witnessed in rising Indian assistance to the Information Technology and Foreign Languages Training Center at the Signal Officers Training School in Nha Trang. The central coast town is near the strategic Cam Ranh naval facility, where Russia maintains residual influence from the Cold War era and the United States is now known to desire special access.

India has agreed to train Vietnamese pilots on Russian-built SU-30s and Sukhoi fighter jets and currently trains Vietnamese submarine operators on Russia-produced Kilo-class submarines. Vietnam purchased six of the vessels from Russia in 2009, the last of which was delivered in 2016. There is also an agreement on the peaceful exploration of space, including over satellites which India will launch from Vietnam to oversee sections of the South China Sea.

As long time clients of Russian arms, India and Vietnam already share a high level of force interoperability. Previously, Vietnam would even send Russian-made parts to India for repairs, as they were done more cheaply there than in Russia. Both nations have also undertaken significant force upgrades in recent years. From 2011 to 2015, Vietnam was the world’s eighth-largest weapons importer, according to a report from Stockholm International Peace Research Institute.

India’s arms sales to Vietnam are part of its ‘Look East’ policy, New Delhi’s pivot-like policy toward Southeast Asia. The Akash missile system sale, if completed, may open the way for greater Indian access to Cam Ranh for purposes of maintenance and training. India is also involved in oil and gas exploration in the South China Sea, including areas that Vietnam claims. An Indian presence at Cam Ranh would be a potential deterrent to China interfering in such exploration operations, analysts say.

Though China obviously factors into Indo-Vietnamese defense cooperation, Hanoi is implementing a wider hedging strategy. India’s Non-Aligned Movement background and growing regional muscle make it a valuable ally outside of US-China competition for influence, as well as the uneasy non-alliance of China and Russia. How China reacts to India’s rising military involvement in the South China Sea, however, is yet to be seen.

This first appeared in AsiaTimes here.

Image Credit: Creative Commons.
 

lcafanboy

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funy chini.jpg
:biggrin2::biggrin2::biggrin2::biggrin2::biggrin2:
They'll cross their legs with pole INSIDE and CRY and WHINE in front of the world like this:
funy chini1.jpg
:rofl::rofl::rofl::rofl::rofl:

And indians will do some bhangra like this:balleballe::balleballe::balleballe:
 

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