UN Security Council Reforms

Discussion in 'International Politics' started by A.V., Mar 8, 2009.

  1. Parthy

    Parthy Air Warrior Senior Member

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    For UNSC seat, India woos Africa

    India will give $250,000 to help build a monument against slavery and remember victims of the slave trade.

    Jamaica's envoy to the UN, Raymond Wolfe, said here this week that this one gesture by India would touch hearts in many countries in Africa and the Caribbean, whose ancestors were victims of this scourge. For India, seeking to change the rules of the global high table, UN Security Council (UNSC), a gift like this helps bring many countries around to supporting India's bid for a permanent seat.

    As India returns to the UNSC after 20 years, it is determined to push through its bid for a permanent seat. Indian envoy Hardeep Puri observed, "Once we get on, we're not going to get off."

    Last week, India brought the UN envoys from cricket-crazy Carribean nations for a long trip -- hobnobbing with the powerful in Delhi and Mumbai, getting a taste of the India growth story as well as Indian hospitality. In April, India has set a bigger task for itself when it hosts a large group of foreign ministers and UN envoys from the least developed countries, a powerful voting bloc in the UN. Among other things, the LDCs may end up issuing a joint document to support India's candidature.

    Small island states like Fiji, Papua New Guinea etc were feted in India at the end of 2010. They are a significant voting bloc in the UN. India's high voltage diplomacy will culminate with the India-Africa summit in summer. India is one of the biggest investors in Africa, occupying almost as important a space as China. This self-canvassing is new to India, but foreign office mandarins say they feel quite at home. "This is what we want to do," said one excited official.

    They expect that by the end of summer, the UN reform momentum will gather speed. But numbers is not the only game in the UN general assembly.

    The Indian campaign for the permanent seat now has five discernible strands. First, canvassing for itself by entertaining waves of diplomats from around the world.

    Second, ensure that India adds value to the UN Security Council. This week, Hardeep Puri told the UN to concentrate on humanitarian relief in Haiti rather than interfere in local politics. On Wednesday, India put out a five-point plan to tackle piracy off the Somalian coast. On Africa, on the Middle East, India is raising its voice, where earlier its diplomacy was best practiced by ducking under the radar.

    Push the G4. All other members, Japan, Germany and Brazil have also embarked on a similar exercise. But if Germany faces problems with some countries for having yet another European country in the UNSC, Russia is dead opposed to Japan (as is China). In the absence of a peace treaty between Russia and Japan, they're technically still at war. Brazil's opponents lie in the Spanish-speaking world.

    Next week, the UNGA will start work on a new report that will give a shape to the reform. This will start the world on a new set of talks on the future shape of the UN.

    Last, but in many ways the most difficult is Africa. According to the G4 plan, Africa gets two permanent seats, but none of the African countries have decided which two that may be. This may drag the effort, because it's pointless to push the African Union to take a decision.


    http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/india/For-UNSC-seat-India-woos-Africa/articleshow/7373918.cms
     
  2. SHASH2K2

    SHASH2K2 New Member

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    G4 pushes for Security Council reform at the earliest


    India, Brazil, Germany and Japan — the G4 nations — on Saturday said that they would press for “urgent” reforms of the U.N. Security Council this year.
    External Affairs Minister S.M. Krishna and foreign ministers from three other nations met at the U.N. headquarters here to step up their campaign even though there is no broad acceptance within the 192 U.N. members on how to reform the world body’s supreme peace and security body.
    “Pressure is mounting here at the United Nations for the U.N. membership to finally face the challenge of addressing Security Council reform in a realistic manner, adjusting it to the current geo-political realities,” said Brazil’s Foreign Minister Antonio de Aguiar Patriota after the meeting.
    “The ministers,” a joint statement released after the meeting said, “agreed to press ahead with all necessary steps to achieve at the earliest an expansion in both the permanent and non-permanent membership categories of the Security Council.”
    “Towards this goal, the G4 countries reaffirmed their readiness to reach out to other countries and to work in close cooperation with them in a spirit of flexibility,” it added.
    Mr. Krishna’s two-day visit is his first trip to the United Nations since India became a non-permanent member on the Security Council in 2011 after a gap of 19 years.
    Security Council reform is on the top of his agenda.
    Speaking to the media after this second meeting in the past six months, Krishna said the four countries decided to “press ahead for Security Council reform on an urgent basis.”
    “Security Council needs to face the realities of the 21st century,” Germany’s foreign minister Guido Westerwelle said, adding that these four countries were not acting in national interest.
    The G4 ministers also underlined the need for Africa to have a permanent seat on the Council.
    The Security Council reform process has been going on for almost two decades. But several questions are yet to be resolved, which include how many new seats should be created, who gets these seats and when should the veto power kick in.
    Negotiations have shifted from the so called “Open Ended Working Group” of the nineties to a text based negotiations, which are headed by Ambassador Zahir Tanin of Afghanistan.
    The latest text is a five page document, which lists the various options of expanding the Council.
    Except Japan, the three other G4 countries are currently on the Council serving as non-permanent members and they are hoping to set the stage for becoming permanent members before their terms expire.
    The four ministers also met General Assembly President Joseph Deiss to discuss Security Council reform.
    Deiss has spoken out strongly in favour of reform.
     
  3. SHASH2K2

    SHASH2K2 New Member

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    Premature reform will undermine unity among UN members: China


    Beijing: As India along with other G4 countries stepped up campaign for urgent reforms of the UN Security Council, China on Sunday warned that forcing "premature" reform plans will not only "undermine" the unity of UN member nations, but also harm the process.

    Harping on the "serious differences" prevailing among members on the issue, China called for working out "broad based consensus".

    Members of the UN should work for a broad-based consensus on the reform of the UN Security Council, Chinese Foreign Ministry spokesman Ma Zhaoxu said, apparently reacting to yesterday's statement by G4 countries calling for finalisation of the UNSC reforms this year itself.

    [​IMG]

    The G4 is an alliance among India, Brazil, Germany and Japan for the purpose of supporting each other's bids for permanent seats on the United Nations Security Council.

    Ma said that China held that UN member nations should seek for a package of solutions for the reform on the basis of broad and democratic consultation among member nations to accommodate interests and concerns of all parties.

    Though some positive progress had been made since inter-government negotiations regarding the reform of the UNSC were launched, there were still serious differences within all parties over certain important issues about the reform, state-run Xinhua news agency quoted Ma as saying in response to the G4 declaration released at the United Nations.

    [​IMG] China advocated that the more differences the member countries had on the reform, the more necessary for UN member nations to enhance dialogue and consultation, Ma said.

    "Experience has proven that presetting results for the reform or forcing premature reform plans will not only undermine the unity of UN member nations, but also harm the reform process, which will not be in line with any party's interests," he said.

    China is ready to maintain contact with all relevant parties, and make joint efforts with other member nations to push forward the reform in a way which can be conducive to safeguarding the overall interests of UN and the unity of the member nations, Ma said.

    The G4 statement said most of UN members supported enlarging the council with new permanent and non-permanent members, and insisted tangible results be achieved in this regard during the Current Session of the UN General Assembly.

    Pressure is mounting on China to take a clear stand on the UNSC reforms ever since US President Barrack Obama's endorsement of India's bid for permanent seat.

    China is the only country among the permanent members which has yet to endorse India's bid for a permanent seat. Last month, China had reacted cautiously to remarks by Hardeep Singh Puri, India's Permanent Representative to UN, that he believed China would not be an obstacle to Indian becoming a permanent member of the UNSC.

    Reacting to Puri's remarks, Chinese Foreign Ministry said "China understands and supports India's desire to play a bigger role in the UN, including its Security Council."

    At the same time, it clarified that there was no change in China's stand.
     
  4. nrj

    nrj Stars and Ambassadors Stars and Ambassadors

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    China ready to support Indian bid for UNSC

    China was ready to back India on United Nations Security Council reforms and delink its relationship with Pakistan to take forward ties, Chinese officials have said.

    China was even ready to support India's move for a permanent seat on the UNSC if India did not associate its bid with Japan, top Chinese diplomats told Sitaram Yechury, Communist Party of India (Marxist) Polit Bureau member, in talks this week.

    Mr. Yechury, who is here at the invitation of the Communist Party of China's (CPC) International Department, told Indian reporters that top Chinese officials, including State Councilor Dai Bingguo, who is China's highest-ranked diplomat, had made clear that they “sincerely want see a qualitative improve in relations with India.”

    Mr. Dai also “bent over backwards” to explain that China was not against India's bid for a seat in the UNSC — a recent sticking point in the bilateral relationship. China is the only one of five permanent members that is yet to back India's bid.

    Mr. Dai told Mr. Yechury that China's reluctance to voice support was more sourced in India's decision to put forward its bid along with Japan, Germany and Brazil, under the banner of the G4 group of nations. He said China could never accept Japan's bid because of “historical baggage”, and was hence opposed to the G4 grouping.

    Mr. Yechury said Chinese officials also appeared to “give a signal” that they did not want to see ties with India “complicated” because of Beijing's ties with Islamabad. Mr. Dai also assured Mr. Yechury that China's presence in Pakistan-occupied Kashmir (PoK) had been limited to “humanitarian assistance”.

    PARTY BUILDING

    Mr. Yechury, here on a party-to-party visit, also met with Li Yuanchao, head of the CPC's Organisation Department, to learn about “party building” and how the CPC, which marked its 90th anniversary on July 1, had succeeded in adapting its ideology to changing times.

    There were lessons in this for the CPI(M), Mr. Yechury said. “There are certain issues where we have to do serious thinking,” he said. “That will be on our agenda for our 20th party congress next April.”
     
  5. sayareakd

    sayareakd Moderator Moderator

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    Yechury should have asked to China, when is china stop supporting and selling arms to China ??
     
  6. LurkerBaba

    LurkerBaba Staff Administrator

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    Can't trust the commies. I'll believe it when some Chinese official directly says it
     
  7. Oracle

    Oracle New Member

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    Trea(ye)chury at work! Commies, OMFL!
     
  8. nrj

    nrj Stars and Ambassadors Stars and Ambassadors

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    India & US at UN: a complicated dance

    During India's first nine months on the Security Council, it has worked with the U.S. on broad themes but often differed on country-specific issues. Council membership has a price: many votes inevitably disappoint some of India's constituencies and international friends.

    When U.S. President Barack Obama announced in Delhi that the United States looked forward to “a reformed U.N. Security Council that includes India as a permanent member,” he was met with thunderous applause. This was the most tangible form of U.S. support for India's ambition to be recognised as a major global player. From the U.S. perspective, it was an act of faith. The U.S. and India have always had a harder time working together in the multilateral arena than they do bilaterally, and the United Nations has been especially tough.

    How do things look nine months after India joined the Security Council for a two-year term? Finding ways to work together has been a challenge for both countries. India has also had to deal with the costs of being in the limelight — the public choices that come with Council membership, and that inevitably disappoint some constituencies and some international friends.

    India and the U.S. have worked most closely together on what one Indian observer called “thematic issues.” Peacekeeping has been an area of strong India-U.S. cooperation for years. This reflects not just India's standing as one of the top three troop contributing countries, but also its strong professional contributions to the U.N.'s peacekeeping capacity. These have earned strong U.S. support and appreciation. Similarly, control of small arms has been a good area for cooperation.

    India's time on the Security Council has expanded the list of broad policy themes where the U.S. and India make common cause. Counter-terrorism is an especially important one. The Indian permanent representative to the U.N., Hardeep Singh Puri, sought the chairmanship of the Security Council's Counter Terrorism Committee, and went about guiding its work in a serious way. This included deepening its links to the expert panel that works with it, the Counter Terrorism Executive Directorate. On September 28, Mr. Puri orchestrated a celebration of the committee's work in the 10 years since its creation, an event that provided the opportunity both for garnering civil society support for the group and for good coverage in the Indian press. U.S. policy-makers support this effort, appreciate the results, and look forward to further collaboration in this area.

    The more contentious broad themes have to do with trade. These come up more often in the World Trade Organisation (WTO) than at the U.N. The U.S. and India have a strained relationship in the WTO, in spite of extensive efforts at high-level consultations.

    When it comes to country-specific issues, however, U.S.-India interaction at the U.N. is more difficult. The Security Council's agenda always contains a large number of debates and resolutions on the Middle East, where the U.S. and India start from different policy positions. The large majority of resolutions passed this year were adopted unanimously. This included some uncontroversial measures on Libya, Afghanistan, and extension of an expert committee established in conjunction with the Security Council's decision on sanctions for Iran.

    Of those where voting was contested, however, the U.S. and India were on opposite sides most of the time. On Libya, India abstained on a March 17 resolution establishing a no-fly zone, together with Brazil, Russia, China and Germany. The resolution was strongly supported by the U.S., and passed with the remaining 10 votes.

    Somewhat to India's discomfiture, Syria came up