Sabre-rattling over Iran

Discussion in 'West Asia & Africa' started by ajtr, Mar 20, 2010.

  1. nrupatunga

    nrupatunga Senior Member Senior Member

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    Did anyone expect any other reaction from those two countries.

     
  2. nrupatunga

    nrupatunga Senior Member Senior Member

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    @SajeevJino Why do you think obama agreed to a deal which would let iran have a go at producing nuclear bombs that too within 6 months.
     
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  3. nrupatunga

    nrupatunga Senior Member Senior Member

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    W.G.Ewald likes this.
  4. nrupatunga

    nrupatunga Senior Member Senior Member

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    [Tweet]404517799172648960[/Tweet]
     
  5. SajeevJino

    SajeevJino Long walk Elite Member

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    Obama ..The Sucker ..


    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------


    In my Minds ..throughout some Watch over the last year to till now ...Iran Have the ablity to Create the Nuke Bomb within a Week

    Iran Can Have A Nuclear Bomb In Six Weeks if Negotiations Fail, Israel Claims - Forbes

    The sources say six weeks ..But in last month's IAEA observations they get the Bomb in weeks ..Because they already setup-ed the Infrastructures


    -
     
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  6. SajeevJino

    SajeevJino Long walk Elite Member

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    These Mullah's even Congratulate If Pakistan Tests another Nuke .and they will welcome the Saudi Pakistani Nuke deal too
     
  7. nrupatunga

    nrupatunga Senior Member Senior Member

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    He is no mullah, but spokesperson on india's ministry of external affairs.

    Also on a side note, can israel really stop every challenger to it in west asia everytime?? How long can it go on doing this?? Sometime some sort of parity has to be reached. Or do you really feel israel can always boss around in west asia??

    RT - What Netanyahu wants is Iran's surrender, not negotiated nuclear deal
     
    Last edited: Nov 24, 2013
  8. nrupatunga

    nrupatunga Senior Member Senior Member

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    See whatever others may say or do, if israel really feels that iran is on the verge of testing few bombs, israel will act. Don't worry. Untill then its all pure PR on either side.
     
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  9. SajeevJino

    SajeevJino Long walk Elite Member

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    Syed Akbaruddin..!! Muslim Name ..?


    Take the Positive Answer ..!!

    Elkin: Israel Can Act Alone Against Iran - Defense/Security - News - Israel National News

    Israel can act alone If needed ..Just like Iraq and Syria How Israel Keeps the Red Lines in the Past and this year too .!! Yes Israel is the Boss in the Middle East even they try to knock out the Pakistani Nukes in the Past If we agree with them Now No Nukes in Pukkkkkkistaan

    Please I didn't read RT from Nov 2012..!! any other links Thanks ..?
     
  10. W.G.Ewald

    W.G.Ewald Defence Professionals/ DFI member of 2 Defence Professionals

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    PJ Media » The ‘Freeze’ That Wasn’t: U.S. Says There’s No Right to Enrich, Iran Says There Is
     
  11. nrupatunga

    nrupatunga Senior Member Senior Member

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    Yes muslim name, but if you had clicked the twitter id, you could see his bio. Also remember even our minister for external affairs is a muslim: salman khurshid.


    Yes today israel can and does boss around, but tomorrow it has to accept some sort of parity in the region. They will face a challenger. Such a small state can not controll much much bigger states for a long time. Though it has done so for the past 60 years, but can it do for the next 60 years as well. Sometime or the other they have to come to an understanding with the arabs. If not anything surely demographics will ensure that israel to reach out to arabs. Also remember west is not the power it used to be to always back israel.

    It maybe a RT article, but the interview is with a former usa diplomat on iran within usa state department

    That person (John Limbert, former Deputy Assistant Secretary of State for Iran,) says this
     
    Last edited: Nov 24, 2013
  12. SajeevJino

    SajeevJino Long walk Elite Member

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    [​IMG]


    From Ynet
     
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  13. SajeevJino

    SajeevJino Long walk Elite Member

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    :okay:



    I can say that words till my breath

    Israel was their only Trusted ally in someways ..and Know that west's Holy Land is Israel

    :hmm: will read it Later ..anyway Thanks
     
  14. amoy

    amoy Senior Member Senior Member

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    http://edition.cnn.com/2013/11/24/world/meast/iran-nuclear-deal-qa/

    Why is Iran's nuclear program considered such a threat?
    Since its revolution, the West has worried Iran could use its nuclear program to produce atomic weapons using highly-enriched uranium. A decade ago, nuclear inspectors from the international agency announced they had found traces of highly-enriched uranium at a plant in Natanz. Iran temporarily halted enrichment, but resumed enriching again in 2006, insisting enrichment was allowed under its agreement with the IAEA.

    Enough with the background. Let's talk about the deal that was reached.
    It's more of an interim agreement before the deal. Described as an initial, six-month deal, the White House says it includes "substantial limitations that will help prevent Iran from creating a nuclear weapon." In short, it slows the country's nuclear development program in exchange for lifting some sanctions while a more formal agreement is worked out.

    It's not permanent, so why is it a big deal?
    For years, Iran and Western powers have left negotiating tables in disagreement, frustration and open animosity. But the diplomatic tone changed after Iran's election this year, which saw President Hassan Rouhani take over. "For the first time in nearly a decade, we have halted the progress of the Iranian nuclear program," U.S. President Barack Obama says.

    What about the stockpiles Iran already has?
    As part of the deal, Iran will be required to dilute its stockpile of uranium that had been enriched to 20%. While uranium isn't bomb-grade until it's enriched to 90% purity, "once you're at 20%, you're about 80% of the way there," Hibbs says. The deal also mandates Iran halt all enrichment above 5% and dismantle the technical equipment required to do that. Before the end of the initial phase of the deal, all its stockpiles should be diluted below 5% or converted to a form not suitable for further enrichment, the deal states.

    Why 5%?
    Iran consistently says it's enriching uranium and building nuclear reactors only for peaceful civilian energy needs. Nuclear power plants use uranium that is enriched to 5%. It's the fuel that the plants use to generate electricity.

    What else will Iran have to do?
    Iran would also have to cut back on constructing new centrifuges and enrichment facilities, and freeze essential work on its heavy-water reactor under development at Arak. That facility could be used as a source of plutonium -- a second pathway to a nuclear bomb. The reactor under construction southwest of Tehran had been a sticking point in earlier negotiations.

    What's a centrifuge?
    It's a mechanism used to enrich uranium.

    How will we know Iran is living up to its end of the deal?
    Iran is expected to provide daily access to inspectors from the international agency, IAEA. The inspectors will be expected to visit centrifuge assembly and storage facilities, uranium mills and the Arak reactor, among others. The P5+1 and Iran will also form a joint task force on the issue.

    What if it doesn't fulfill its commitment?
    The international community will add more sanctions -- and pressure.

    What's in it for Iran?
    Billions of dollars.

    As part of preliminary steps, the world powers involved in the talks will provide "limited, temporary, targeted, and reversible relief to Iran."

    The deal calls for no new nuclear-related sanctions in the six-month period if Iran keeps its end of the bargain. The world powers will also suspend sanctions on various items, including gold and petrochemical exports. That suspension will provide Iran with about $1.5 billion in revenue, according to the White House. Sanctions relief will also target other areas, including government funds from restricted Iranian accounts for its students in other countries.

    But the White House says the $7 billion in total relief is just a small fraction. "The vast majority of Iran's approximately $100 billion in foreign exchange holdings are inaccessible or restricted by sanctions," it says.

    What's not in the deal?
    A better deal would have included Iranians shipping out their highly enriched uranium to be converted elsewhere, says Aaron David Miller, vice president of the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars. "It would have been better ... if Iran had much more of their nuclear infrastructure put out of use. But that's the deal they got."

    How did the sanctions come to be?
    Seven years ago, the U.N. Security Council passed sanctions against Iran for failing to suspend its nuclear program. Sanctions that initially targeted Iran's nuclear capability expanded to include bans on arms sales, Iranian oil and certain financial institutions, including the country's central bank. This has crippled its economy and made Iran a pariah in the international community. Oil revenues have plummeted, and the local currency had dropped 80% in value by 2012. Iranians have faced spiraling inflation and layoffs.

    Why isn't Israel applauding the deal?
    The two nearby countries and archrivals have been at each other's throats for years. Israel says it has the most to lose if Iran develops a nuclear bomb. It has repeatedly warned the West to tread warily when dealing with Tehran. And Israeli lawmakers are not happy that their greatest ally, the United States, has disregarded their warning and struck an interim deal with Iran. Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu called the agreement a "historic mistake" that his country isn't bound by.

    So much tension between Iran and Israel, why?
    It wasn't always this way. After the birth of Israel in 1948, the two nations enjoyed a "honeymoon" that lasted until just before the 1979 revolution, says David Menashri, professor emeritus of Tel Aviv University. Israel even supplied weapons to Iran to help it fight their common enemy, Iraq. But the Islamic revolution that overthrew the Shah marked a turning point. The Islamic republic, led by Shiite clerics in the predominantly Shiite nation, saw Israel as an illegitimate state with no right to exist, certainly not amid Muslim nations. Years later, Israel began to regard Iran and its support of global terror as a chief threat. Those concerns escalated when international inspectors found traces of highly enriched uranium at a power plant in Iran.

    Who else is unhappy?
    Saudi Arabia. It's a majority Sunni country. Iran is majority Shiite. Saudi Arabia, like Israel, is troubled by Iran's growing clout in the Middle East. "The Saudi government has been very concerned about these negotiations with Iran and unhappy at the prospect of a deal with Iran," a Saudi government official who is not authorized to speak to the media told CNN.

    So, will this interim deal work?
    There are no perfect agreements. And the success of any interim deal will be measured "in months and years, not in minutes," says Karim Sadjadpour of the Carnegie Endowment. Whether Iran is serious about mothballing its nuclear ambitions remains to be seen. There may be sizable obstacles that aren't yet apparent. There are certainly aspects where the deal stopped short. For now, Miller says, don't break open the champagne bottles just yet.
     
    Last edited: Nov 25, 2013
  15. nrupatunga

    nrupatunga Senior Member Senior Member

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    The Real Nuclear Option
     
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  16. SajeevJino

    SajeevJino Long walk Elite Member

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    Interesting




    Ha ha add ..Spice 2000 and Various Land Attack cruise Missiles



    If 10 nukes ,Means ...Lol Persia
     
  17. SajeevJino

    SajeevJino Long walk Elite Member

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    Iran nuclear deal: Saudi Arabia warns it will strike out on its own


    Saudi Arabia claims they were kept in the dark by Western allies over Iran nuclear deal and says it will strike out on its own


    Saudi Arabia, has previously expressed unease about US overtures to Iran. The dialogue helped pushed along efforts by Washington and others to strike a deal with Iran seeking to ease Western concerns that Tehran could move toward nuclear weapons.

    Qatar's Foreign Ministry said the deal is an "important step toward safeguarding peace and stability in the region".

    Bahrain, Kuwait and the United Arab Emirates have issued similar statements.


    Iran nuclear deal: Saudi Arabia warns it will strike out on its own - Telegraph


    :notbad:
     
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  18. SajeevJino

    SajeevJino Long walk Elite Member

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    US may seek partial dismantling of Arak reactor


    ‘We’re not sure why you need a heavy water reactor for any civilian peaceful purpose,’ says senior US negotiator Wendy Sherman



    The US State Department’s lead negotiator on Iran’s nuclear program suggested Wednesday that the US would push the Islamic Republic to dismantle part of its Arak nuclear reactor as part of a final agreement.

    A comprehensive agreement “includes a lot of dismantling of their infrastructure,” Under Secretary of State for Political Affairs Wendy Sherman said in an interview on the PBS network.

    “Because, quite frankly, we’re not quite sure what you need a 40-megawatt heavy water reactor – which is what Arak is – for any civilian peaceful purpose.”

    Iran has said that it will continue with construction at the Arak reactor for the duration of an interim agreement reached with the P5+1 in Geneva last month.
    However, the Islamic Republic has indicated that it will not increase the facility’s capacity or produce more nuclear fuel there while the deal was in place.

    The Arak reactor became a significant stumbling blocks during the Geneva talks, where Iran agreed to limit its nuclear program in exchange for an easing of crippling economic sanctions. The interim agreement has yet to be finalized.

    When operational, the Arak facility could produce plutonium, one of two substances that can form the core of a nuclear weapon. The other is enriched uranium. The White House said Tuesday that a final deal with Iran could include the capacity for some uranium enrichment.

    “We are prepared to negotiate a strictly limited enrichment program in the end state, but only because the Iranians have indicated for the first time in a public document that they are prepared to accept rigorous monitoring and limits on level, scope, capacity, and stockpiles,” Bernadette Meehan, the National Security Council spokeswoman, said in a statement Tuesday to JTA, in response to a query arising from a story first reported by the Washington Free Beacon.

    It has been reported for months that the Obama administration and Western powers were prepared to tolerate low level enrichment as part of a permanent deal; Meehan’s statements Tuesday were the first on-the-record confirmation.

    Israel opposes any permanent enrichment capacity, saying that at even low levels,
    the infrastructure required for such enrichment leaves Iran perilously close to the ability to manufacture a weapon.

    “If we can reach an understanding on all of these strict constraints, then we can have an arrangement that includes a very modest amount of enrichment that is tied to Iran’s actual needs and that eliminates any near-term breakout capability,” Meehan said. “If we can’t, then we’ll be right back to insisting on no enrichment.”

    US may seek partial dismantling of Arak reactor | The Times of Israel
     
  19. SajeevJino

    SajeevJino Long walk Elite Member

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    Iran to seek S-300 substitute in Russia


    [​IMG]

    Antey-2500 (S 300VM)


    Iran said it is sending officials to Russia to choose a substitute for the sophisticated long-range S-300 air defense missile system, which Russia said it would not deliver to Tehran.

    Iran’s Fars news agency reported Tuesday that National Security and Foreign Policy Commission chair Alaeddin Boroujerdi met with Iran’s ambassador to Russia to discuss possible replacements for the S-300 system.

    “A team from the defense ministry has left [for Russia] and another team is due to travel there again to discuss the issue,” the news agency quoted Defense Committee chairman Esmail Kosari as saying.

    One possible substitute suggested by the news agency was the Antei-2500 system,
    which does not fall under sanctions imposed on Tehran and is geared for use by ground forces — unlike the S-300, which is geared towards use by missile defense forces.

    In 2010, Russia called off the sale of five S-300 missile batteries to Iran as part of an agreement worth $800 million.

    The two countries had signed the S-300 missile system deal in 2007, but it was canceled as part of UN Security Council sanctions against the Islamic Republic. The cancellation led to tensions between the two countries, including a $4 billion Iranian lawsuit against Russia.

    In November, Iran announced it had inaugurated a missile production plant aimed at improving the country’s air defense capabilities.

    Iranian Defense Minister Gen. Hossein Dehghan announced that the Sayyad-2 missile production facility would allow the Islamic Republic to hit helicopters, drones and other aerial targets at medium range. The solid fuel gives the missiles improved accuracy compared to liquid-fueled missiles, which make up the bulk of Iran’s air defense arsenal.

    Dehghan said scientists have also completed research on another missile system named Talash, or effort.

    A week later, Tehran said it successfully tested a new air defense system modeled after the US Hawk system during a drill in the country’s east. A senior Iranian official called the maneuvers a “slap” to America and Israel.

    Earlier reports said the new surface-to-air system is named “Mersad,” or Ambush. It is capable of locking a flying object at a distance of 80 kilometers and can hit from 45 kilometers away, state TV said.

    Tehran has been trying to set up a self-sufficient military program since 1992, putting an emphasis on air defense and naval power.

    Israel and the West have expressed concern in the past over Iran obtaining the state-of-the-art anti-aircraft missiles, as they could severely affect the outcome of an airstrike against Iran’s nuclear reactors. Israel has also urged Russia not to sell the S-300 system to Syria, where it could impact Israel’s air supremacy relating to both Syria and Lebanon.

    Israel and the US have not ruled out a military option against Iran’s suspect nuclear program, which the West fears intends to produce atomic weapons. Iran denies the charge, saying its nuclear program is for peaceful purposes only.

    Iran to seek S-300 substitute in Russia | The Times of Israel
     
  20. SajeevJino

    SajeevJino Long walk Elite Member

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    Iran sends warships to Atlantic

    Two Iranian warships set sail Tuesday for the Atlantic Ocean on their Navy's first-ever mission there, state TV reported

    The voyage comes amid an ongoing push by Iran to demonstrate the ability to project power across the Middle East and beyond.

    The report said that the destroyer Sabalan and the logistic helicopter carrier Khark will be dispatched on a three-month voyage.

    "The warships will have task of securing shipping routes as well as training new personnel," the semi-official Fars news agency quoted Iran's navy chief Admiral Habibollah Sayyari as saying.

    It said the ships, carrying some 30 navy academy cadets for training along with their regular crews, left the southern Iranian port of Bandar Abbas. It did not mention any ports of call.

    Iran has regularly deployed warships to the Gulf of Aden off the eastern coast of Africa to fight piracy and protect commercial ships.

    The recent Iranian naval surge is also a response to US naval deployment near the Islamic Republic's coasts in the Persian Gulf. The US Navy's 5th fleet is based in Bahrain – across the gulf from Iran.

    It has also sent its warships to Syrian waters in recent years.

    In 2012, Iran said it aims to put warships in international waters off the US coast within the next few years, and extend its reach as far as Antarctica.

    Iran sends warships to Atlantic - Israel News, Ynetnews


    :facepalm:
     

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