Indian Navy Developments & Discussions

Discussion in 'Indian Navy' started by .v0id, Feb 12, 2009.

  1. Triton

    Triton Founding Member

    Joined:
    Feb 16, 2009
    Messages:
    342
    Likes Received:
    7
    Navy eyeing micro-submarine

     
  2. Singh

    Singh Phat Cat Administrator

    Joined:
    Feb 23, 2009
    Messages:
    20,316
    Likes Received:
    8,342
    Location:
    011
    pyro please google why France's next aircraft carrier would be conventionally powered as opposed to nuclear powered Charles de Gaulle and why UK is not going for nuclear powered aircraft carriers.
     
  3. nitesh

    nitesh Mob Control Manager Stars and Ambassadors

    Joined:
    Feb 12, 2009
    Messages:
    7,550
    Likes Received:
    1,280
    Location:
    Bangalore
  4. LETHALFORCE

    LETHALFORCE Moderator Moderator

    Joined:
    Feb 16, 2009
    Messages:
    23,052
    Likes Received:
    15,174
    this is a good development, I always felt we need to focus on more anti-submarine weapons since the threat of Chinese subs is so real.
     
  5. LETHALFORCE

    LETHALFORCE Moderator Moderator

    Joined:
    Feb 16, 2009
    Messages:
    23,052
    Likes Received:
    15,174
    Seabed array system prototype tested

    http://www.hindu.com/2009/03/02/stories/2009030255611400.htm

    Seabed array system prototype tested

    S. Anandan

    Kochi: Just when coastal India broods over measures to counter seaborne threats, the Defence Research and Development Organisation (DRDO) is in the process of developing an integrated costal defence system under its Project Nayan.

    “The development of seabed array system, forming its pivot, is making steadfast progress and we have tested the prototype successfully,” a top source told The Hindu.

    “The idea is to get alerted when objects traverse the waters. The echo emanating from various objects like fish, various types of ships, submarines and the like have been calibrated and identified for the purpose. Now that the prototype is ready, we need to test it as a system with multiple layers and at various depths,” said the source.
    Water medium

    The array would transmit the ricocheted signal to the top water medium, maybe a sonobuoy, which in turn would be transmitted to the shore-based command and control centre by way of an unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) or a satellite.

    “Once the capability is unambiguously demonstrated, it will be installed initially at Karwar under Project Seabird. However, for the entire system to come into being, we require an exclusive ocean satellite. That, however, has not come so far,” said the source.
    Another project

    In progress, however, is another ambitious programme that will augment the DRDO’s underwater detection capabilities. Oceanic waves are photographed, in multiple pixels, using a remote sensing satellite.

    As in the seabed array system, various types of waves created by movement of different objects are standardised and using signal processing, the cause of a definite kind of wave is recognised.
    Encouraging

    “In its nascent stage, initial trials pertaining to wave-identification have been highly encouraging. At present, we are developing the method of signal processing but we need to demonstrate it at the system level and in real-time to call it a full-fledged programme,” the source said.
     
  6. LETHALFORCE

    LETHALFORCE Moderator Moderator

    Joined:
    Feb 16, 2009
    Messages:
    23,052
    Likes Received:
    15,174
  7. LETHALFORCE

    LETHALFORCE Moderator Moderator

    Joined:
    Feb 16, 2009
    Messages:
    23,052
    Likes Received:
    15,174
    Navy to get Advanced anti-submarine rocket by August

    http://www.newsonair.com/news.asp?cat=national&id=NN5692

    Navy to get Advanced anti-submarine rocket by August

    Mar 2
    In Tamil Nadu, the Heavy Alloy Penetrator Project (HAPP), Tiruchy, will issue the second generation of the advanced anti submarine rocket for user trials by August this year. The first generation of the anti submarine rocket for Navy is currently under various user trials at PINA, Pune said the General Manager of HAPP, Shri R.R. Yadav at Tiruchirapalli today. He further said HAPP is capable of manufacturing the first generation of anti submarine in bulk once it receives orders from the Navy.

    At present Navy is importing anti submarine rockets. The manufacture of these rockets indigenous will further boost the Research and Developmental activities of HAPP, he said on the side lines of the silver jubilee celebrations of the Project.

    HAPP is also tries to tap the potential in civil market in a big way by supplying tailor made products to firms like Midhani, Hyderabad, HAL, Bangalore, BHEL, Haridwar, he said. Projects are on for the development of rockets for Air Force. It will be ready by next year, he said.
     
  8. A.V.

    A.V. New Member

    Joined:
    Feb 16, 2009
    Messages:
    6,503
    Likes Received:
    1,122
    Location:
    Moscow, russia
    thats a very good news sir post some more details on this as soon as you get i am interested in knowing the technical specs.

    thanx
     
  9. ahmedsid

    ahmedsid Top Gun Senior Member

    Joined:
    Feb 21, 2009
    Messages:
    2,958
    Likes Received:
    243
    INS Viraat set for 'power projection' trip to Gulf

    INS Viraat set for 'power projection' trip to Gulf

    New Delhi: India's solitary aircraft carrier, INS Viraat, is expected to go on a "power projection" trip to West Asia and Gulf of Aden after completing its service life- enhancing refit programme at Cochin Shipyard this June end.

    "INS Viraat is likely to sail for about a month-and-a-half in the Arabian Sea and may go up to the Gulf of Aden after the refit programme. It is only a power projection visit and not for anti-piracy operations," Navy officers said here on Tuesday.

    "When it is back in India, the Navy will celebrate the golden jubilee of the ship's service in the Indian and the British navies," he said.

    Viraat had moved into the Cochin Shipyard late last year to undergo the mandatory maintenance refit and repair.

    "This warship, the largest at present in the Indian Navy with a 29,000-tonne displacement, can be dry docked only in the Cochin Shipyard, being the only such facility in the country," the shipyard's officials said.

    When the work on the aircraft carrier is over, it would sail as a carrier battle group along with Navy's destroyers, frigates and other warships in the Arabian Sea.

    "Viraat is a powerful and a potent warship. Its presence is a great assuring factor for other warships of the fleet. Hence it would move as a carrier battle group. And no navy would like to waste such a huge asset on anti-piracy operations, as it has a major role during war," an officer said.

    http://news.in.msn.com/national/article.aspx?cp-documentid=1890677
     
  10. A.V.

    A.V. New Member

    Joined:
    Feb 16, 2009
    Messages:
    6,503
    Likes Received:
    1,122
    Location:
    Moscow, russia
    Indian navy’s p-8i lrmp –– god of the seas

    By Shashank Sinha
    The Indian Navy (IN) has finally concluded a US$ 2-plus billion deal for eight Boeing P8I ‘Poseidon’ Long Range Maritime Patrol Aircraft (LRMP), in what is the biggest defence deal yet with the United States. The first aircraft is expected to arrive within 48 months of the contract being signed, with deliveries being completed by 2016.
    The very first P-8A airframe is currently undergoing integration with onboard electronic surveillance, intelligence and attack systems, and is due to be delivered to the US Navy (USN) later this year to begin the test program which is expected to culminate with IOC 2012.
    In many ways this is a revolutionary acquisition program for the IN, affecting a jump in its maritime surveillance capabilities in the region and better integrated joint operations with other players.
    Origins
    The Indian version called the P8I (for India) is a direct outcome of a two-year requirement study started in 1997 by the USN, for the replacement of its P-3C Orion fleet. Boeing and Lockheed Martin were shortlisted in 2002 for proposals, with the former presenting a 737-800 ERX based platform while the latter proposed an upgraded ‘Orion’.
    Boeing went ahead to create a technology demonstrator based on the successful BBJ platform to test on board systems, leading to selection of P8 in July 2004. Five test airframes are expected to be produced by 2012 with full scale production to commence subsequent to IOC. By modifying an existing aircraft with a proven track record, Boeing was able to better focus its attention on behind-the-scenes engineering, and a streamlined production process involved in the project.


    Missions
    The P8I will carry a heady mix of multi dimensional electronic sensors to carry out diverse missions:
    Radar to detect surface shipping movements;
    Magnetic Anomaly Detector (MAD) to detect submarine movements. The MAD is typically mounted on an extension from the tail of the aircraft in order to minimize the aircraft's magnetic field interference towards the MAD;
    Sonobuoy dropped from the aircraft onto the sea to detect submarine movements, then transmit the data back to the aircraft;
    ELINT sensors to monitor civilian and military telecommunications;
    Infrared camera to monitor shipping movements.
    Indian Navy is expected to retain the best of the US electronic suite, while also opting for quite a bit of mix and match by procuring some key sensors like Radar (Elta EL/M-2022(V)3) from Israel and Wescam MX-15 Electro-Optic/Infrared Sensor (EO/IR) from Canada.
    In order to perform such varied missions, P8 would carry a crew 0f nine consisting of dual-pilot, five mission crew (plus relief pilot and in-flight technician). Each of the mission crew would be responsible of running the mission sensors through five integrated consoles.
    Weapons
    Like its predecessors the P-8 also sports an internal bomb bay to accommodate a mission specific mix of torpedoes, bombs and mines. The principle weapon is likely to be a derivative of Raytheon Mk54 torpedoes, modified for high altitude release, that will be more typical of a jet based MMA. A total of five Mk54 can be carried and should make an excellent addition to IN’s arsenal. Under wing hard points will provide for additional carriage of Harpoon missiles for ASW missions.
    Operational Aspects
    Prop or Jet?
    The P-8 is not without its detractors though. Much of initial debate is focused on the suitability of a turbofan powered aircraft verses the conventional turboprop LRMP aircraft. Although, a jet powered aircraft would make a faster transit to the operating area than a turboprop, a jet is also inherently much less fuel efficient at low-level. It is the low-level performance of a 737, an area that an ASW aircraft spends considerable amount of time in that is giving many commentators cause for concern. This assumes special significance when using the Magnetic Anomaly Detector (MAD) to track a submarine (P-8I as opposed to P-8A will have one), the P-8 will need fly at around 200ft above sea level and make 2G, 60 degree tightly banked turns. With a fairly modest, highly swept super-critical wing optimized for high-level / high speed cruise, the handling and turning characteristics of a fully loaded 737-800 may not be optimum, and as some point out maybe downright dangerous.
    To obtain a better understanding of the above scenario however, one has to appreciate how the typical Anti Submarine Warfare (ASW) operations are conducted today. There are basically three stages of ASW ops:
    Detection
    Tracking
    Localization/attack.
    Detection is done in any number of ways and can originate from different sensors. For the maritime patrol aircraft (MPA), it’s usually done at altitude using sonobuoys, either based upon intelligence or upon detection by some other asset. This is easy on the airframe because higher-level flight is usually smooth and aggressive high-G manoeuvres are rare. Passive tracking (using the target’s noise and not generating any yourself) of a located target is also relatively less demanding and again, at a higher altitude. Things get tough during the third stage that is localization for an attack. For this earlier platforms like the P-3 used active sonobuoys that “ping” to provide a distance and bearing to the target, which now knows you are there and begins high-speed evasive manoeuvring. The P-3 also used magnetic anomaly detection (MAD) to provide an “on top” mark from the sub’s steel hull. This is low-level, yanking and banking flight that puts the aircraft through a lot of relatively high-G as a result of steep turns and low-level turbulence, which really wears down both the airframe and crew. In fact, the USN is trying to extend the life of its remaining P-3s as much as possible by minimizing low-altitude flight. One step has been to create a kit that turns the P-3’s Mk 54 torpedo into a glide bomb that may be launched from altitude. The P-8A is being designed without MAD for USN, clearly reflecting an intention to minimize low-altitude flight, both for airframe ease and limiting a target’s chances of detecting a tracking airplane.
    However, this certainly doesn’t mean that the P-8 is wholly unsuitable for low altitude operations and designed to completely avoid it. Boeing tried to allay similar reservations on part of the USN, during the technology demonstrator trial in December 2003, when a 737 BBJ2, simulating a P-8, did a tour of major US Naval Air Stations. The strenuous set of demonstrations included tactical manoeuvres at an altitude of 200ft, and simulated single engine manoeuvres.
    In actual scenarios, MPA don't normally fly down to 200ft, only descending to low levels once a target has been identified. For normal ops, current tactics call for flight at a cruise altitude, with a series of quick dives to drop sonobuoys and torpedoes. It would not be safe to fly at 200ft for the whole flight anyway, no matter whether it's a P-3 or a P-8. Apart from the stress on man and machine, a loss of power at low level would also mean a catastrophic loss of altitude. As mentioned earlier, the ASW aircraft will increasingly shed the need to fly low, as glide torpedoes come on line. Some respite in this department will also come from UAVs working in conjunction, which will take over the majority of level flying.
    To what extent the above solutions remain relevant to Indian Navy is however still open to interpretation. The Indian P-8I will surely need to undertake some amount of low level flying to operate the MAD gear. Although it is not something beyond the capability of the P-8, in a tactical scenario, it is bound have an impact on the endurance requirements. Again, this is not something limited to a jet platform, and the P-8I too will benefit as more UAVs enter the IN operations. It must also be mentioned here, that MAD sensors are not optimal and certainly never primary sensors for submarine detection being prone to clutter from undersea ore deposits etc.
    Twin Jet: How Safe?
    The second most significant issue for the P-8 is the question regarding safety regime of a twin jet configuration. As operators make transition from earlier quad turboprop platforms like P-3, Tu-114 and Il-38, they have voiced apprehensions about a twin jet platform’s inherent lack of redundancy. The issue might seem redundant today in the age of safe twin jet air transports, but it was serious enough for at least one potential operator, namely the Japanese, who sight this factor as one of the reasons to go for their indigenous Kawasaki P-1 MPA powered by four turbofans.
    However, apart from some inherent danger of an engine failure at low level, the risk factor should be the same as for any twin jet commercial liner. An engine failure seems less and less probable in the age of modern aero engines, and the P8 scores here, being based on a proven design/power plant combination. Even in the case of such eventuality, loss of an engine doesn’t necessarily results in an immediate crash. Based on known cases of similar failures during landing takeoff stage, the aircraft begins to bank, providing the crew some time to react and compensate. In the event of a similar failure in cruise regime, it doesn’t automatically translate into loss of 50% of power. Since the aircraft does not cruise at 100% engine power to begin with, and upon losing one engine, thrust is increased on the other engine to compensate. This is more likely to result in a fall in power from 70% down to around 55% (the other engine can be pushed harder in emergencies), and the primary effect will be on cruising speed, rather than flyability.
     
  11. A.V.

    A.V. New Member

    Joined:
    Feb 16, 2009
    Messages:
    6,503
    Likes Received:
    1,122
    Location:
    Moscow, russia
    Range and Reach
    Thanks to highly fuel efficient modern engine technology, the P-8 in spite of carrying much less internal fuel, compares favourably in range and endurance, to some of the older prop based platforms it will succeed:
    P-8 ‘Poseidon’
    P-3 ‘Orion’
    IL-38 ‘May’
    Speed
    490 knots (564 mph)
    Speed
    330 knots (379.8 mph)
    Speed
    347 knots (399 mph)
    Range
    1200+ nautical miles radius
    (1,381 miles) with 4hours on station

    Range
    845 nautical miles radius (973.1
    miles) with 3 hours on station
    Range
    1188 nautical miles radius (1367 miles) Total endurance 12 hours
    Fuel
    10,000 pounds
    Fuel
    60,000 pounds
    Fuel
    48,000 pounds approx.
    Gross Weight
    187,700 pounds
    Gross Weight
    139,760 pounds
    Gross Weight
    39,700


    Conclusions

    The P-8I deal is in many ways a revolutionary deal for the Indian Navy, and it should dramatically improve its surveillance and ASW capabilities. It is also a representation of the new found confidence in Indo-US security relationship. It must stand out as the single most high technology defence hardware transfer to India as compared to previous deals of weapon locating radars, surface ship and transport aircrafts. Performance-wise, the Boeing P-8 is the most capable successor to any legacy LRMP platform like the P-3 Orion it is designed to replace, or in the Indian case the venerable Tu-142 Bear.

    It's based off a very successful airliner, with over 5,400 built and around 7,000 ordered, giving us an assured supply of spares and technical support. Despite the high unit cost and perhaps some yet to be ascertained high life cycle costs, apart from issues with end user agreements, India is picking up a system which ran into more than $3.89 billion in development costs. In fact we should expect further airframes to join the fleet in midterm future as Indian Navy expands its operations and a force of 8 aircrafts may turn out to be too stretched out to meet operational requirements. Although IN has traditionally fielded very small LRMP fleets comprising of around a dozen platforms (Japan for instance plans to induct as many as 78 P-1 aircraft), faced with an increasing PLAN SSN threat in mid to long-term, it may opt for an expanded force structure of such platforms.
     
  12. LETHALFORCE

    LETHALFORCE Moderator Moderator

    Joined:
    Feb 16, 2009
    Messages:
    23,052
    Likes Received:
    15,174
    Ordnance Unit develops anti-submarine rocket for Navy

    http://www.indopia.in/India-usa-uk-news/latest-news/514564/National/1/20/1

    Ordnance Unit develops anti-submarine rocket for Navy






    Tiruchirapalli , Mar 2 The Heavy Alloys Penetrator Project (HAPP) ordnance factory here has developed an anti- submarine rocket (RGB-12) for the Indian Navy, 10 of which are under user trials at Pena, Pune, a top official said.

    R R Yadava, factory General Manager, told reporters here that R&D efforts in reverse engineering had been used to develop the missile. A pilot batch of improved version of the rockets with enhanced capabilities was also being developed (RGB-60) for user trials by August 2009, he said.

    The rockets were so far imported by the Navy and so indigenous efforts would save foreign exchange, he said.

    The factory, originally established to manufacture kinetic energy products like FSAPDS ( Fins Stabilised Armour Piercing Discarding Sabot) for the Indian Army, has diversified since the Sabots are not used at present.

    HAPP possesses state-of-the-art facilities, skilled manpower and has one of the largest powder metallurgy plants in Asia, dealing with tungsten alloys for manufacture of penetrators for kinetic energy projectiles, he said.

    In recent times, HAPP had established bulk manufacturing of tungsten alloy pre-fragments for PINAKA rocket, Bomb Body for 81mm mortar bombs, base Bleed and adapters for 155 ERFB shells.
     
  13. LETHALFORCE

    LETHALFORCE Moderator Moderator

    Joined:
    Feb 16, 2009
    Messages:
    23,052
    Likes Received:
    15,174
    Navy eyeing micro-submarine

    http://publication.samachar.com/pub...4|3762825|3762826|3762827|3758529&nextIndex=1



    India Express Buzz
    Wednesday, March 04, 2009 6:27 AM IST


    Navy eyeing micro-submarine


    Manoj K Das
    First Published : 02 Mar 2009 01:59:00 AM IST
    Last Updated : 02 Mar 2009 12:41:20 PM IST

    KOCHI: In an effort to strengthen its underwater attack capabilities the Indian Navy is in talks with the Naval Science and Technical Laboratory, Visakhapatnam, to build a micro-submarine for its strategic operations.

    The NSTL scientists have put the preliminary design of a vessel on their drawing board. Sources told Express that the micro-submarine will have a carrying capacity of six persons. It will have the endurance of a normal submarine.

    “All major navies have a fleet of small submarines. They are used for reconnaissance and intelligence gathering. The same boats are also used for special operations like closeto- shore commando strikes,” sources said.

    The Indian Navy has asked NSTL scientists to come up with a model similar to the ones used by advanced forces. “A manned microsubmarine has gained strategic relevance in this era of surgical strikes. It won’t leave loud signatures that can be heard by enemy sonar or other monitoring mechanisms,” sources said.

    The project will be a totally indigenous effort. The Defence Ministry wants this to be showcased as a public-private initiative. “We will rope in builders or firms that will play a role in fabricating its parts from the beginning. There are a few names like L&T and Tata who have evinced interest in playing a bigger role in the defence industry,” sources said.

    The NSTL is expected to finish the design by 2010. The hope is to carry out the first trials by 2015. In another development, the Navy successfully carried out two live trials of super torpedo Varunastra. This torpedo weighs twice as much as the conventional one and has a longer range.

    “The two test firings were on target.

    Varunastra can accurately kill a big ship anywhere in a radius of 10 km. This being a big weapon, one torpedo can effectively take out a potential threat,” sources said adding that the Navy has asked for 100 weapons which will be delivered by the year end.
     
  14. Atul

    Atul Founding Member

    Joined:
    Feb 24, 2009
    Messages:
    514
    Likes Received:
    9
    Location:
    Navi-Mumbai
    Project -75A

    The Indian Navy has issued RFIs (request for information) to a number of international shipbuilding and design yards/firms for the next generation of submarines to be constructed at its shipyards. When issued, the contract will be worth an estimated Rs30,000 crore and provide a second line of conventionally propelled submarines after the state-of-the-art French designed Scorpene hunter killer submarines currently under manufacture at French and Indian shipyards.

    The Scorpene project is being executed at a cost of Rs18,798-crore.

    According to naval sources, the RFIs (request for information) has been issued to Russian (Rosoboronexport), French (Armaris) and German (HDW) firms, amongst others, and that two rounds of discussions have already taken place. Sources said that another round of discussions were likely before the RFP (request for proposal), or a global tender, will be issued in after elections 2009.

    To be executed under Project -75A all the six vessels of this second line of diesel-electric submarines, will be equipped with air-independent propulsion (AIP) systems which will significantly boost their operational capabilities.

    The AIP system enables conventional diesel-electric submarines to stay submerged longer than other conventional subs which have to surface or snorkel every few days to get oxygen to recharge their batteries.

    These subs will posses a high degree of stealth, land-attack capability and the ability to incorporate futuristic technologies. Like the Scorpenes, they will also be built in an Indian shipyard with special emphasis on full transfer of technology.
    :vehicle_plane:
     
  15. Atul

    Atul Founding Member

    Joined:
    Feb 24, 2009
    Messages:
    514
    Likes Received:
    9
    Location:
    Navi-Mumbai
    The Good News is, the Navy plans to procure 30 new submarines to have formidable underwater fighting capabilities. Currently India already has 16 submarines of the Russian Kilo and German HDW Shishumar Class.

    Among the countries from where India is seeking information are France, Russia and Italy, ( I Personally believe or wish the USA should also be added in this list ) all with major submarine manufacturing capabilities. The new submarines would be procured as a follow-on of the six Scorpene submarines being built at the Defence Public Sector Undertaking shipyard, Mazagon Dockyards Limited (MDL), in Mumbai.

    The Bad News is the additional six submarines will start joining the Indian Navy fleet after all the first set of six Scorpenes have joined the naval fleet, that means expect them only after 2017.
    :vehicle_plane:
     
  16. LETHALFORCE

    LETHALFORCE Moderator Moderator

    Joined:
    Feb 16, 2009
    Messages:
    23,052
    Likes Received:
    15,174
    India's nuclear submarine plan surfaces

    http://www.atimes.com/atimes/South_Asia/KB20Df02.html

    India's nuclear submarine plan surfaces
    Siddharth Srivastava

    NEW DELHI - Expressing fears about cross-border terrorism in the wake of the November 26 Mumbai attack and keeping a close eye on China's military expansion, India announced plans this week to hike its defense budget by 34% to 1.4 trillion rupees (US$30 billion) and last week revealed that its project to build three nuclear-powered submarines is nearing completion.

    "Things are in the final stage now in the Advanced Technology Vessel [nuclear-submarines] project. There were [mainly technical] bottlenecks earlier ... they are over now," Defense Minister A K Antony said on February 12.

    The Advanced Technology Vessel (ATV) project is part of India's $3 billion plan to build five submarines and complete what it calls



    a "triad" of nuclear weapon launch capability - from air, land and sea. India is concurrently developing the K-15 ballistic missile, which can be nuclear-tipped and launched from submarines.

    Defense sources have told Asia Times Online that New Delhi has been actively seeking out assistance from France in the implementation of the ATV project, and that Russian engineers are already involved. The sources said that the sea trials of the nuclear-powered submarines should begin this month and that the submarines should be operational within the next three years.

    The secretive ATV nuclear backed ballistic missile submarine (SSBN) project began in the late 1970's and is being implemented at a secret dry dock in Visakhapatnam, India's Eastern Naval command base. Observers have said that the submarines are a critical addition to India's weapons capabilities.

    In a grim reminder of the possible dangers facing India from the sea, India's Naval chief Admiral Suresh Mehta warned this week that terrorists could smuggle "dirty" nuclear bombs via the nation's ports as they lack adequate security measures. Terrorists also used a sea route to infiltrate Mumbai.

    Nuclear-powered submarines with their greater speed, power, range and the length of time they can stay submerged compared to conventional diesel-electric submarines are effective for sudden strikes as well as fast and stealthy protection from attacks.

    New Delhi has been concerned about Beijing's strengthening of bilateral ties with Islamabad, particularly given recent tension on sea projects such as at the Gwadar port. China has also been developing ties with Sri Lanka and Myanmar to deepen its control over a complex energy-security conflict being aggressively played out in the region.

    Given the ongoing tussle between India and China to control the waters of the Indian Ocean
    , the New Delhi government has been put under tremendous pressure from the navy to ramp up India's sea power. China has already spoken of creating three ocean-going fleets to patrol the areas of Japan and Korea, the western Pacific, the Malacca Strait and the Indian Ocean.

    The ATV project has been in the spotlight as India's other attempt to procure a nuclear submarine this year received a setback when Russia "indefinitely" postponed delivery of the Akula-II class Nerpa nuclear submarine, citing incomplete sea trials and a lack of funds.

    Further, the Amur shipyard in Russia's far east, where the sub is being built, is yet to finalize a new team following an accident in November in which 20 members were killed. The accident has led Indian media to describe the submarine as "cursed".

    India has been looking at developing underseas capabilities to launch nuclear weapons, after gaining some competence in land-based nuclear delivery platforms for the domestically developed ballistic missiles Prithvi and Agni.

    India has already developed a submarine-launched supersonic missile, a modification of the BrahMos cruise missiles, an achievement previously limited to only advanced nations such as the US, France and Russia. Ship and land launched versions of the BrahMos are being introduced in the navy and army.

    The state-controlled Defense Research and Development Organization is also undertaking a joint development project with Israel Aerospace Industries to develop a surface-to-air missile which can be launched from land and ships.

    Upgrade and renovation of India's navy will be an important aspect of India's US$50 billion defense modernization exercise. Under the plan, the projects code named 75 and 76 entail the production of 24 underwater vessels valued at US$20 billion to meet the challenges across the Indian Ocean.

    In 2007, construction of the highly-advanced Scorpene submarine began at the upgraded Mazgon Dock in Mumbai as part of a US$3.5 billion deal for six such French submarines. As the Scorpene deal involves transfer of technology, it should be beneficial for both nations as India gains new technology and French firms gain a possible foothold in the big Indian market.

    But significant delays are now expected in India's acquisition of the aircraft carriers Admiral Gorskov from Russia and two that are being developed at home. In early 2007, India purchased the 36-year-old US warship the USS Trenton (re-christened INS Jalashwa) with a gross tonnage of 16,900 tons for US$50 million.

    The Trenton is the first ever US warship owned by the Indian Navy and the second largest that India possesses after the INS Viraat aircraft carrier. The Indian Navy plans to add 40 new warships to its fleet and the government plans to invest over 500 billion rupees (over US$12 billion) over the next 10 years on warships.

    The government has encouraged the private sector to play a bigger role in the nation's defense, and India's largest engineering and construction firm Larsen & Toubro has announced plans to build defense warships and paramilitary vessels at a proposed facility in Tamil Nadu.

    After the rude awakening of the Mumbai terror attacks, others branches of the military are also now pushing for more upgrades and additions.

    The Indian Air Force, for example, is seeking 42 fighter squadrons up from the current 32 or 33 squadrons (each with 14 to 18 jets), to offset the phasing out of older Russian planes. The army, which has been allocated a large piece of the military outlay, is seeking more tanks and howitzer field guns.

    Siddharth Srivastava is a New Delhi-based journalist. He can be reached at [email protected].
     
  17. Triton

    Triton Founding Member

    Joined:
    Feb 16, 2009
    Messages:
    342
    Likes Received:
    7
    Indian navy officer to sail solo around world in yacht

     
  18. jayadev

    jayadev Founding Member

    Joined:
    Feb 17, 2009
    Messages:
    137
    Likes Received:
    23
    Location:
    deep south
    Indian navy officer to sail solo around world in yacht

    NEW DELHI, March 7 (Xinhua) -- An Indian navy officer is planning to become the first Indian to sail solo around the world in an Indian-made sailing yacht, reported local daily The Hindu on Saturday.

    Commander Dilip Donde of the Indian Navy will set sail from Mumbai on India's Dependence Day, August 15, and spend nine months on the high seas, said the report.

    Donde, who has been serving in the Indian Navy for 20 years and training for the mission for three years, will travel some 35,000 kilometers while having on board only food supplies and medicines, said the report.

    Donde will make four stops in his eastward journey: Fremantle, western Australia, Christchurch, New Zealand, Stanley, the British occupied Malvinas Islands off Argentina, and Cape Town, South Africa, said the report.

    His yacht, the Mhadei, is a 23-ton, 17-meter-long vessel which cost 40 million rupees (800,000 U.S. dollars). The first such boat built in India, the yacht is equipped with state-of-the-art navigation systems, a Swedish engine, a South African mast and New Zealand sails, while the hull is made in India, according to the report.

    The Western Command of the Indian Navy Thursday formally received in Mumbai's Naval Dockyard the yacht, said the report.
    http://news.xinhuanet.com/english/2009-03/07/content_10962731.htm
    :boat:
     
  19. EnlightenedMonk

    EnlightenedMonk Member of The Month JULY 2009 Senior Member

    Joined:
    Mar 7, 2009
    Messages:
    3,831
    Likes Received:
    23
    Hmmm... good, so, the carrier will be back in June. But, how potent it'll still be is anybody's guess... Anyways, I heard that it has only 12 to 13 Harriers left on it... and, what about the Vikramaditya, any news about that ???
     
  20. Payeng

    Payeng Daku Mongol Singh

    Joined:
    Mar 7, 2009
    Messages:
    2,522
    Likes Received:
    769
    Location:
    Neistan
    I really like the micro submarine concept, they can prove to be a great offensive weapon for future underwater warfare considering a matching endurance to a normal submarine. They can also prove to be an underwater mobility vehicle for our Macros and for a prospective underwater unmanned vehicle plateform. Micro subs can be a great handy weapon for future operation Trident like missions, if I am not wrong they are harder to detect too.

    Larger Nuclear powered subs especially the hunter killer ones can serve as mother ship for such micro subs.
     

Share This Page