Pakistan political discussions

Discussion in 'Pakistan' started by A.V., Feb 16, 2009.

  1. nitesh

    nitesh Mob Control Manager Stars and Ambassadors

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    What a hogwash there is no comparison between mutalik and company abd the Taliban. Mutalik and company are controlled by police arrested and presneted in front of law. Whereas taliban are the ruler. Total baseless comments.
     
  2. thakur_ritesh

    thakur_ritesh Administrator Administrator

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    The similarity as I see is the extreme right wing nature of both, and their agenda to implement their rather orthodox beliefs come what may, but the I guess the similarity ends there, or is it more to it which I shy away from seeing, and in case it is then I would wonder what.


    I will refrain from commenting on pakistan, but yes will for sure comment on the rout in our society. The good thing that happens in a country like ours is that people like the mutalik's, or the raj thackeray's get side lined pretty soon and the nuisance is not allowed to carry on for long, the politics of tagoria's or the shahi imam of jama masjid are not allowed to prosper and they die their own death which is generally sooner than latter, and some where I will give the credit for this to happen to the maturing indian democracy, the extensive coverage and the extensive viewership of the electronic media, the judiciary which is still seen as a “temple of justice”, the very strong civil society groups who are listened to, NGOs, and all these together work as very good pressure groups on the decision makers, and they in turn help in formulating the views of public at large.


    But some where indian politics is like a creation of vacuum where such hate politics gets its breeding space like one recalls the gujarat polls in the not so distant past where every thing was going smoothly and the topic of debate was development, when all of a sudden congress found themselves being completely overshadowed and brought in the communal angle. Has some one seen the changing politics of the bjp which once was seen as a complete “hindu” party, is now trying to approach a constituency which they never even bothered to look at, least address them and their concerns and this change has happened because they realise that extreme right wing attitude will not earn them the respect, and when the indian society can transform the bjp then certain extreme pockets of right wings on either side can and are well checkmated.


    I think one thing that needs to be looked into very carefully for sure is the over appeasement of any sect, caste, religion, region, and if that is allowed to happen then we will see such emergence of over zealous hate politics, it is best that such things are clipped in its bud rather than what we got to see in mangalore, and for those who do not go with my thoughts I would say, just think about it from the other angle where you are the one facing these goons, understanding then becomes a lot easier.






    PS: I am not in favor of such comparisons as then there is bound to be flame wars and then there is bad blood all around. My request will be even if such a topic has to posted/read/discussed there should not be a separate dedicated thread, rather the same could have found space in the pak politics thread.


    JMT and rgds.
     
  3. A.V.

    A.V. New Member

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    threads are merged.
     
  4. Singh

    Singh Phat Cat Administrator

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    Pakistan, Taliban battle ‘like in Palestine’

    INAYAT KILLAY: Pakistani troops guarded the remnants of a war zone as a military convoy crunched past shops blown to pieces and an electricity pylon collapsed on rubble near the Afghan border.

    'Any human being who sees this destruction will cry. There was bombing, there was shelling, we have never seen such fighting,' Haroon Ahmed told AFP by telephone that evening from the village of Inayat Killay.

    'It looked like we were in Palestine. It was like two countries fighting,' said Ahmed, still too frightened to give his real name so soon after the army declared victory and expunged the Taliban menace from his village.

    Pakistani helicopter gunships, artillery, tanks and ground troops fought to recover the area from hundreds of armed Taliban. There was hand-to-hand combat in the street, said Ahmed.

    Days after the guns fell silent, the army drove the international media into Inayat Killay to prove that one of the most notorious militant lairs in the wild, semi-autonomous tribal district of Bajaur was safe to visit.

    The country is under US pressure to eliminate Al-Qaeda and Taliban safe havens in areas such as these along the Afghan border. Fed up with criticism it is not doing enough, the military now wants to boast about places like Bajaur.

    Taliban-free streets, even those reduced to rubble, are the images that Pakistan wants to get on to the world's television screens.

    Amid the pulverised shops, dangling wires, smashed iron shutters and walls shot up, commanders even announced a 'symbolic ceremony of surrender.' Smiling tribal elders, who, we were told, were opposed to the Taliban, put garlands of tinsel round the neck of a visiting general and formally agreed not to allow the Taliban back.

    But what they need now is reconstruction, electricity and running water, all likely to cost millions of rupees.

    The civilian chief administrator, wheeled out with his shaky English, said he was asking international donors to provide money he did not expect from a cash-strapped, weakened central government.

    But there was no time for details. The military hustled journalists back to waiting helicopters and the neighbouring tribal district of Mohmand, another of Pakistan's seven semi-autonomous areas.

    There commanders seemed more nervous, suggesting that women may be 'more comfortable' sitting in one of glass-tinted vehicles, rather than riding on the back of a truck, worried that headscarfs might come unstuck in the wind.

    Racing through a valley, scaling a mountain ridge and down on to a grassy plain, the convoy finally halted outside another heavily damaged building, a school-turned-militant headquarters, according to commanders.

    'Three weeks back it was a planning centre used to attack us. There were 40 to 50 militants here before we cleared it,' said Colonel Saifullah, pointing to tank tracks in the mud.

    The ground was strewn with broken glass and exercise books tumbled out of a cupboard. Numbers were still chalked on a blackboard and English assignments were left on the floor. There was little sign of the militants.

    Local residents contacted by AFP afterwards said the Taliban had fled to the mountains and were still attacking security forces, proof that the battle was far from over.

    http://www.dawn.com/wps/wcm/connect...pakistan,+taliban+battle+like+in+palestine-rs
     
  5. nitesh

    nitesh Mob Control Manager Stars and Ambassadors

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  6. sagar

    sagar Regular Member

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    I have a question for pakistanis frens .what is it with pakistanis and brahmins?why the brahminophobia.i have visited a lot of pakistanis sites all of them complain about brahamins .;;);;)
     
  7. nitesh

    nitesh Mob Control Manager Stars and Ambassadors

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    http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/Opinion/Editorial/articlelist/articleshow/4224319.cms

    No love lost
    5 Mar 2009, 0000 hrs IST, Vikram Sood

    Over the years Pakistan has come to believe that the world is beholden to it because it exists. This notion of indispensability allows those in power in that country to be wild, delinquent and dangerous. Like the spoilt brat of a rich and doting parent, Pakistan either becomes petulant when it is not granted what it unjustifiably demands or becomes belligerent when it is granted that wish by its benefactor. Today, Pakistan has a begging bowl economy; terrorism is its main export. Unending unrest in Balochistan and sectarian violence in Dera Ismail Khan and Dera Ghazi Khan, coupled with a creaking law and order and judicial systems, evoke little confidence in that country.

    There are many in India who are ready to give Pakistan another chance forever. They say Pakistanis are like us but the poor souls are stuck with rotten governments and they need our help to get them out of their predicament. It is incredibly naive of us to build policies for our future and security on fond nostalgia, which is mostly one way. They teach their children mostly how to hate India with warped versions of history, even in their mainstream schools.

    It is strange that we still keep telling Pakistanis that we are all alike and have a common culture and so on. The truth is that they do not want to be like us and, quite honestly, we have nothing in common with them. Not anymore. First of all, our minority population is more Indian than the minorities there are Pakistani. And our majority too is different from the majority across the border. Pakistanis have never understood, therefore never accepted, the concept of accommodating minorities. Not that we do it perfectly but we do a fairly good job.

    In Pakistan, you are either a Shia, Bohra or an Ismaili or an Ahmediya. Being a woman, a Baloch, a Pushtun, a Sindhi or a Mohajir or a Hindu hari is a curse.
    Only a Sunni Punjabi is a true-blue Pakistani. Arguments with minorities are settled with a bullet. It is difficult for a Pakistani to understand that minorities can also have a say. Our cricket team symbolises our diversity. Pakistan does not have an equivalent of Bollywood and if it did, Hindus would never dominate the industry.

    There are other fundamental differences. They deny history and even geography, we seek our roots in our civilisation. Extremists there cry jihad in the name of god. We have room for all faiths at the Dargah in Ajmer Sharif, in Darbar Sahib (whose foundation stone was laid by Mian Mir) or San Thome. Fewer Pakistanis understand that it is easy or natural for an Indian to listen to Jafar Hussain Badayuni's rendering of Amir Khusro's `Bahut kathin hai dagar' or `Ek pita ekas ke hum baarek' by Bhai Maninder Singh and Bhai Jitender Singh or `Jai Madhav Madan Murari' by Jagjit Singh on any morning.

    In Pakistan today, we see images of mullahs leading a march to medievalism. In India, we see the young and exuberant marching into the 21st century. We are still behind the rest of the advanced world but are determined to catch up. Across the border, they wallow in a sense of victimhood, and blame everyone else for their plight.

    In Pakistan, the extremists believe that Islam and democracy are incompatible. Secularism does not exist in the mullah's vocabulary, or even in the minds of some self-proclaimed moderates like General Musharraf.

    So what do we have in common with Pakistan that we yearn for? The answer is nothing. We are two different countries with two different kinds of people on two different trajectories and we here should be happy with that.
    Pakistan will strike deals with al-Qaeda, will encourage Lashkar-e-Taiba to carry out attacks on India and will appease the Taliban. It would seem that they have a death wish. It would be prudent for us to take measures now in case Pakistan's wish is granted.


    The writer is a former secretary, Research and Analysis Wing.
     
  8. nitesh

    nitesh Mob Control Manager Stars and Ambassadors

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    http://www.dailypioneer.com/160533/Jihadis-turn-on-Pakistan.html

    Jihadis turn on Pakistan

    G Parthasarathy

    Pakistan’s politicians appear to learn nothing from their country’s past, when lack of respect for democratic and constitutional norms and institutions led to military takeovers. Whether it was the coup staged by Gen Iskandar Mirza and Gen Ayub Khan within a decade of independence, the ouster of Zulfiqar Ali Bhutto after allegations of rigging the national election, or the 1999 takeover by Gen Pervez Musharraf — the political class had so thoroughly discredited itself that not a voice was raised whenever the Army’s infamous 111 Brigade moved in to take over the country.

    Is Pakistan moving in this direction again with President Asif Ali Zardari and Mr Nawaz Sharif locked in a confrontation? Where is Pakistan headed after Mr Zardari’s refusal to restore the former Chief Justice of Pakistan Iftikhar Muhammad Chaudhry to the Supreme Court, and the decision of the apex court, headed by a Chief Justice beholden to Gen Musharraf and Mr Zardari, to declare Mr Sharif and his brother, Shahbaz, ineligible to stand for elections and hold high office?

    Mr Sharif himself can have no great claims to being a stickler for constitutional propriety. Following the ouster of Benazir Bhutto in 1990 in a constitutional coup staged by then President Ghulam Ishaq Khan and Army chief Mirza Aslam Beg, Mr Sharif led an alliance of Right-wing parties, duly bankrolled by the ISI, to become Prime Minister. During Mr Sharif’s second term as Prime Minister, goons from his ruling Pakistan Muslim League, led by his political secretary, Mr Mushtaq Tahir Kheli, stormed the Supreme Court on November 28, 1997, during a confrontation with then Chief Justice Sajjad Ali Shah.

    His present claims of ‘respect’ for constitutional propriety and independence of the judiciary are primarily motivated by his belief that, if restored to office, sacked Chief Justice Chaudhry will declare Gen Musharraf’s actions illegal and seek punitive action against him. Mr Zardari believes that if this happens, the immunity granted to him by Gen Musharraf in cases of corruption would be revoked. Pakistan’s squabbling and feudal politicians have still to learn that in political life, compromise is a better option than vendetta.

    The Zardari-Sharif feud is being played out in Islamabad and in Lahore, the capital of Pakistan’s populous Punjab province, where Sharif enjoys widespread support. This battle is being carried into Islamabad by lawyers demanding the restoration of sacked Chief Justice Chaudhry to office. The lawyers are determined to converge in large numbers on the capital. Mr Zardari’s coalition partners are uneasy over the looming confrontation. His authoritarian style of functioning is leading to tensions and differences within the ruling Pakistan People’s Party, and particularly with his hand-picked Prime Minister, Mr Yousuf Raza Gilani.

    With Mr Gilani appearing determined to trim Mr Zardari’s powers by seeking to disband the National Security Council, which the President presides over, Pakistan could see a Government hamstrung by internal rivalries and challenged by a confrontational Opposition. In such a situation, the Army, which recognises that years of misrule by it has resulted in public disenchantment, will remain the dominant player in shaping national security policies, while gleefully allowing the politicians to discredit themselves.

    These developments have led to American and international recognition that outside powers and visiting VIPs have to deal directly with Army chief Ashfaq Parvez Kayani while professing support for democracy in Pakistan. For India, this means that the ability of Pakistan’s civilian interlocutors to deliver results on issues like terrorism is very limited. This becomes important now because evidence corroborated by the FBI shows the Pakistani Army-controlled Special Communications Organisation was involved in developing communications facilities for Lashkar-e-Tayyeba terrorists and their handlers in Pakistan who executed the 26/11 Mumbai carnage. It also means that given the links of senior LeT functionaries like operations chief Zaki-ur-Rahman Lakhvi and communications chief Zarar Shah with the ISI and other elements in the Pakistani Army, there is little prospect of either a comprehensive investigation or a transparent trial of the perpetrators of the carnage.

    Noted American commentators like journalist David Sanger have exposed the duplicity of the Pakistani military establishment, led earlier by Gen Musharraf and now by Gen Kayani, in supporting Taliban leaders and even informing Taliban fighters of impending American military operations. Sanger has revealed that the CIA had monitored a conversation in which Gen Kayani described the top Taliban military commander, Jalaluddin Haqqani, as a “strategic asset”. Sanger has also exposed the ISI’s involvement in the bombing of the Indian Embassy in Kabul.

    Pakistan has paid a high price for its duplicity and the policies of successive Army chiefs of seeking ‘strategic depth’ in Afghanistan and ‘bleeding India with a thousand cuts’, utilising radical Islamic groups. These groups have joined hands and created a situation wherein the entire North-West Frontier Province, including Swat valley, located 160 km from Islamabad, is now under Taliban rule. The Durand Line, which Afghanistan has never recognised as its international border, has virtually ceased to exist. Rather than gaining ‘strategic depth’ in Afghanistan, all that the Pakistani Army has achieved is giving ‘strategic depth’ to the Taliban in Pakistan.

    In this volatile situation, New Delhi cannot rule out the possibility of even more terrorist strikes in the coming months. The Rand Corporation has carried out a detailed study authored, among others, by former US envoy to India Robert Blackwill and strategic analyst Ashley Tellis. The report notes that the objective of the LeT, which is dedicated to destroying what it calls a “Crusader, Zionist, Hindu alliance”, is not merely ‘liberating’ Kashmir but breaking up India and promoting Hindu-Muslim tensions. The report is critical of the absence of effective coordination between agencies like the IB, the R&AW and State police forces, while noting that the police across India lack the equipment and training to meet the terrorist threat.

    While Home Minister P Chidambaram has moved swiftly to deal with the mismanagement and inefficiency that his predecessor promoted in the country’s security set-up, it would be a serious mistake to under-estimate the challenges India still faces from jihadi terrorism emanating from across its border and from radicalised youth within the country. The Rand Corporation report notes, “For the foreseeable future India is likely to remain a target of Pakistan-based terrorism.” More importantly, it says that while India understands the “costs of military action”, it should clearly understand the costs of “not responding” to terrorist outrages sponsored from across its border.
     
  9. A.V.

    A.V. New Member

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    Pakistan army, Taliban mediator strike 17-point accord in Swat valley

    ISLAMABAD, March 4 (Xinhua) -- Pakistan's security forces and a Muslim cleric, a mediator for peace talks between Pakistani government and local Taliban, signed a 17-point accord on Wednesday in the troubled Swat valley.

      The accord was signed by the security forces and Sufi Muhammad, founding chief of a religious group Tehrik Nifaz Shariat-i-Muhammadi(TNSM), local televisions reported.

      The reports gave no further details about the accord, but it is the latest development in Swat valley since local Taliban led by Maulana Fazlullah announced indefinite ceasefire in February.

      Sufi Muhammad has been mediating peace talks in a bid to persuade the Taliban to lay down arms on the condition of the implementation of Shariah, or Islamic laws, in the region.

      The accord came after Sufi Muhammad set a deadline of March 15 to the government to set up Islamic courts and to release Taliban prisoners as agreed.

      But two security men were killed and one injured in an ambush in Swat valley on Tuesday. The government termed the incident a violation of the peace accord because militants opened unprovoked fire at the security men.
     
  10. nitesh

    nitesh Mob Control Manager Stars and Ambassadors

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  11. Rage

    Rage DFI TEAM Stars and Ambassadors

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    Truce under fire

    Thursday, March 05, 2009


    The truce in Swat seems to be on the verge of falling apart. Days after the NWFP chief minister defended the decision of his government to enforce Sharia in the area, the chief of the TNSM is warning he may not be able to guarantee peace much longer. The military has hotly denied Sufi Mohammad’s allegations that they have violated the agreement. Two security personnel have been killed after their vehicle was ambushed.

    It seems ridiculous that anyone thought the ceasefire with militants would hold. Now that the warnings in this respect have proven correct, there is a need to plan for the future. The government needs to sit down, think and determine how it intends to handle the issue. Attempts at deals have failed before, they will fail again. Other strategies need to be thought up, with the involvement of the military. Otherwise we will once more be faced with a situation where chaos reigns in Swat, people face death each day and the state lacks the ability to restore any semblance of stability.


    http://www.thenews.com.pk/daily_detail.asp?id=165777
     
  12. Rage

    Rage DFI TEAM Stars and Ambassadors

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    Charities in Pak being used to legitimize extremism: US

    8 Mar 2009, 1211 hrs IST, PTI


    NEW DELHI: The United States has said many charities in Pakistan act as channels to fund terrorist organisations, besides providing material support.

    A senior official of the US treasury department looking after terror financing said large amounts of charity meant for Pakistan based organizations is being moved through hawala networks and hence is an "enormous" challenge to India and the world as a whole.

    "You know when you talk about Pakistan, the charities that are there on the ground providing services guided by such communities legitimizing violent extremist movements. They are very important for that," acting assistant secretary (terrorist financing) of US department of the treasury Daniel Glaser said.

    Glaser, who was in the national capital recently, said such organisations move their money through alternate remittance system or hawala and that is an "enormous, enormous challenge to India and to all of us."

    He said it is beyond dispute that charities are a primary means by which terrorists raise, move, and utilize funds.

    "Most terrorist organizations openly advertise themselves as charities. Charities represent a uniquely ideal vehicle not just to raise and move funds, but to provide material support to violent extremist movements in the form of radicalization, indoctrination and logistical cover and support," he said.


    http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/...itimize-extremism-US-/articleshow/4240986.cms
     
  13. EnlightenedMonk

    EnlightenedMonk Member of The Month JULY 2009 Senior Member

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    I guess we and Pakistan are already seeing the fallout of the Peace deal with the Taliban in the Swat valley.

    Bombings everyday in other parts of the country. I guess a Dargah was bombed the other day.

    Now, I hope they'll think twice before making peace with any other terror outfit again...
     
  14. nitesh

    nitesh Mob Control Manager Stars and Ambassadors

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  15. nitesh

    nitesh Mob Control Manager Stars and Ambassadors

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  16. nitesh

    nitesh Mob Control Manager Stars and Ambassadors

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    http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/Columnists/M-J-Akbar-A-flawed-idea/articleshow/4240191.cms

    MJ Akbar
    A flawed idea
    8 Mar 2009, 0238 hrs IST, M J Akbar

    Indians and Pakistanis are the same people. Why then have the two nations moved on such divergent arcs over the last six decades? The idea of India is stronger than the Indian, and the idea of Pakistan weaker than the Pakistani. Multi-religious, multi-ethnic, secular, democratic India was an idea that belonged to the future; one-dimensional Pakistan was a concept borrowed from the fears of the past. India has progressed into a modern nation occasionally hampered by backward forces. Pakistan is regressing into a medieval society with a smattering of modern elements.

    Pakistan was born out of the wedlock of two inter-related propositions. Its founders argued, without any substantive evidence, that Hindus and Muslims could never live together as equals in a single nation. They imposed a parallel theory, perhaps in an effort to strengthen the argument with an emotive layer, that Islam was in danger on the subcontinent. Pakistan's declared destiny, therefore, was not merely as a refuge for some Indian Muslims, but also a fortress of the faith. This was the rationale for what became known as the "two-nation theory". The British bought the argument, the Congress accepted it reluctantly, the Muslim League exulted.

    The Indian state was founded on equality and equity: political equality through democracy, religious equality through secularism, gender equality, and economic equity. Economic equality is a fantasy, but without an equitable economy that works towards the elimination of poverty there cannot be a sustainable state. India, therefore, saw land reforms and the abolition of zamindari. Pakistan has been unable to enforce land reforms. India and Pakistan were alternative models for a nation-state. Time would determine which idea had the legs to reach a modern horizon.

    The two strands within Pakistan's DNA began to slowly split its personality. The father of the nation, Mohammed Ali Jinnah, thought he had produced a child in his own image, but his secular prescription was soon suppressed. His ideas were buried at his funeral. His heirs began to concede space to mullahs like Maulana Maudoodi who asked, in essence, that if Pakistan had been created to defend Islam, then who would be its best guardians?

    After some debate, the first Constitution in 1956 proclaimed Pakistan as an "Islamic" state. It was an uneasy compromise. No one cared (or dared) to examine what it might mean. The principal institutions of state, and the economy, remained largely in the control of the secular tendency until, through racist prejudice, arrogance and awesome military incompetence it was unable to protect the integrity of the nation. The crisis of 1969-1971, and the second partition of the subcontinent, which created a Muslim-majority Bangladesh out of a Muslim-majority Pakistan, forced Pakistan to introspect deeply about its identity.

    Perhaps the last true secularist of this Islamic state was the Western-Oriented-Gentleman Zulfikar Ali Bhutto, who came to power in 1971, preached emancipation from poverty and did not mind a spot of whisky in the evening. By the end of his six years in office, he had imposed prohibition. The ground had begun to shift even before the coup that brought Gen Zia to power.

    Zia had the answer to his own question: if Islam was the cement of Pakistan, how could you expect the edifice to survive if the cement had been diluted. Islam became the ideology of the state, not as a liberal and liberating influence, but in its Wahabi manifestation: compulsory prayers in government offices, public flogging, the worst form of gender bias in legislation, the conversion of history into anti-Hindu and anti-Indian fantasy, a distorted school curriculum, with "Islamic knowledge" becoming a criterion for selection to academic posts. The Soviet invasion of Afghanistan provided the excuse for the adoption of "jihad" as state policy as well as a medley of irregular forces, liberally funded by American and Saudi money. The madrassas became not only the supply factories for irregular soldiers, but also the breeding ground for armed bands that are holding Pakistan hostage today.

    If it had been only a question of an individual's excesses Zia's death could have been a swivel moment for the restoration of the pre-Zia era, particularly since his successor was Benazir Bhutto. But in the quarter century since his sudden death by mid-air explosion, no one in Islamabad has had the courage to change the curriculum or challenge the spread of the madrassas. There are now over 20,000 of them, with perhaps two million students, most (not all) of them controlled by extremists. Worse, prompted by thoughtless advice, Benazir engineered the rise of the Taliban and helped it conquer Kabul. The children of Gen Zia are now threatening Islamabad. Sometimes a simple fact can illuminate the nature of a society. During the 2005 earthquake, male students of the Frontier Medical College were stopped by religious fanatics - their elders - from saving girls from the rubble of their school building. The girls were allowed to die rather than be "polluted" by the male touch. This would be inconceivable in India.

    For six decades, power in Pakistan has teetered between military dictatorship and civilian rule. When the credibility of civilians was exhausted the people welcomed the army; when the generals overstayed their welcome, the citizen returned to political parties. Pakistan is facing a dangerous moment, when the credibility of both the military and politicians seems to have ebbed beyond recovery. How long before the poor and the middle classes turn to the theocrats waiting to take over? The state has already handed over a province like Swat to Islamic rule. Men like Baitullah Mehsud, Mangal Bagh and Maulana Faziullah are a very different breed from the mullahs who have already been co-opted and corrupted by the system. They have a supplementary query which resonates with the street and the village after 9/11: why is Pakistan's army fighting America's war against fellow Muslims? Any suggestion that Pakistan might have become a much larger base for terrorists than Afghanistan ever was is met with the usual response, denial.

    On the day that terrorists attacked Sri Lankan cricketers, I had a previously arranged speaking engagement at a university in Delhi before largely Muslim students. I began with the suggestion that every Indian Muslim should offer a special, public prayer of thanks to the Almighty Allah for His extraordinary benevolence - for the mercy He had shown by preventing us from ending up in Pakistan in 1947. The suggestion was received with startled amusement, instinctive applause and a palpable sense of sheer relief.
     
  17. EnlightenedMonk

    EnlightenedMonk Member of The Month JULY 2009 Senior Member

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    Not much reaction ??? They'll be up in arms !!!

    There's no question of them allowing precision strikes... its just against their whole "ideology". They consider India to be their arch-enemy and any information of such an attack would be devastating to them. People would be up in arms and consider it an "Act of War" and the whole nine yards... what'll you do then ??? Missiles will be raining down on you if you ask me...

    And, what about the Army ??? Even if we, by some strange act of god manage to convince their Government, the Army will definitely not buy this solution... And, who knows??? Is the Army running the Government or is the Government running the Army???

    I'd say, just sit back and wait till they get devoured by their own terrorists. Its much safer that way, and when its all done launch precision strikes. Quick and fast.
     
  18. EnlightenedMonk

    EnlightenedMonk Member of The Month JULY 2009 Senior Member

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    Perform or Perish, Army Chief Tells Zardari

    Saw this news in more than one website -

     
  19. Singh

    Singh Phat Cat Administrator

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    Taliban execute Pakistani troops in Mohmand

    Taliban execute Pakistani troops in Mohmand

    The Pakistani military and the Taliban fought intense battles over the weekend in two of the tribal agencies where the government has claimed to have defeated the extremist group.

    Taliban forces under the command of Mohmand leader Omar Khalid killed or captured 17 members of the Khasaddar Force, a lightly armed paramilitary police unit, and three government officials late Saturday night.

    The Khasaddar were dispatched to the home of a local tribal leader after the Taliban surrounded his home. The Taliban attacked the tribal leader because he has helped the government in the past and had recently welcomed the Mohmand political agent and the commander of the Frontier Corps' Mohmand Rifles into his home, Daily Times reported.

    The Taliban ambushed the paramilitary force as it attempted to come to the aid of the tribal leader. Six troops were killed and 11 more were captured during the fighting, and three government officials were also captured, Dawn reported. The bodies of the six troops killed in the fighting were recovered along with two other troops who were "slaughtered," a term often used to describe the mutalation and beheading of captured troops. Nine troops are still in custody.

    The military claimed fifteen Taliban fighters were killed during the clashes. The homes of three Taliban leaders were razed and a curfew and military operation were launched. The Frontier Corps "pounded suspected Taliban hideouts with artillery," a source told Daily Times.

    In Bajaur, the Taliban violated a two-week old ceasefire after attacking a military checkpoint. Four Taliban fighters were reported to have been killed.

    The attack took place as the government and elders of the Mamond tribe signed a "28-point deal" to end the fighting. "Tribal elders assured the government that militants will lay down arms and live peacefully in Mamond under the deal," local administration officials said, Geo News reported.

    The Mamond had promised to end support of the Taliban in the past but is known to have close ties with the group as well as al Qaeda. The tribe had drug its feet over the past year, resisting government calls to end support for the Taliban. In 2006, the Mamond signed an agreement to end support for the Taliban and eject foreign fighters from the region. The peace deal collapsed and the Taliban grew in strength, ultimately taking control of the district and establishing a parallel government.

    The attacks in Mohmand and Bajaur took place just weeks after the military claimed the Taliban were defeated and driven from the region. The military said the eight month long operation in Bajaur resulted in the expulsion of the Taliban while the operations in Mohmand over the past several months ended Taliban dominance in the agency.

    But no senior Taliban leader have been killed or captured, and its fighters are said to have melted into the mountains to fight another day. The military claimed Omar Khalid and Bajaur Taliban leader Faqir Mohammed were killed during these operations, but both men have since spoken to the press.

    The military is currently conducting operations in the Taliban tribal strongholds of Arakzai and Khyber, and claimed to have ended the siege of Peshawar, despite a rash of deadly attacks on police outposts in the provincial capital. The Taliban strongholds of North and South Waziristan have not been touched during the current round of operations.

    The Taliban have extended its influence beyond the tribal areas and has taken control of territory in the Northwest Frontier Province. The government ceded the districts of Swat, Malakand, Dir, Chitral, Buner, Shangla, and Kohistan to the Taliban after ceding to demands that sharia, or Islamic law, be enforced in the region. The agreement merely recognized the reality on the ground, as the Taliban had virtual control over much of the region. The insurgency is also expanding into Punjab province, where the Taliban have begun military assaults on police outposts in several districts.

    http://www.longwarjournal.org/archives/2009/03/taliban_execute_paki.php
     
  20. Singh

    Singh Phat Cat Administrator

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    Militants murder eight troops abducted from Mohmand

    GHALANAI/CHARSADDA: Militants brutally killed eight kidnapped members of the Khasaddar Force (a paramilitary unit) in Shabqadar, Charsadda district on Saturday night after their convoy was ambushed in the adjacent Mohmand tribal region.

    Local Taliban’s head Omer Khalid tribal journalists by phone that his group had kidnapped and killed the personnel and also destroyed three official vehicles. He said that political tehsildar Irshad Ali and two subaidars were also in their captivity.

    He told journalists that militants were ready to hold talks with the government if their activists were released and all check posts in the area were removed.

    Authorities had claimed that Omer Khalid was killed in an operation about two months ago in Mohmand region.

    In retaliation, security forces backed by gunship helicopters launched an offensive and targeted several positions of militants in Mohmand region. Security officials claimed that 15 militants were killed in the shelling in the Chapri Area. Forces had arrested four suspects, they added. Displacement has been reported from several areas of Mohmand and Shabqadar.

    Police and paramilitary forces have imposed curfew and launched operation against militants in settled and tribal areas. Security forces had carried major operation in the same locality last year and claimed to have clear area from miscreants.

    Residents said that militants had besieged residence of a tribal elder Malik Noor Zada in Saperi area near Afghan border in the Mohmand region on Saturday. The elder called political administration and sought protection.

    They said that political administration dispatched Khasaddars and tehsildar Irshad Ali to rescue the elder who had invited political agent for feast on his house. The invitation irritated local militants and they encircled the residence of Noor Zada.

    Sources said that militants ambushed the Khasaddars, killing six of them on the spot, and captured 11 others including tehsildar Irshad Ali. On Sunday morning eight bodies were found in Aysha Koroona of Shabqadar tehsil. Doctors at Shabqadar hospital said that six personnel were shot dead and two were slaughtered.

    Police were also dispatched to the site and bodies were brought to the hospital for postmortem. Forces immediately imposed curfew in area from Pir Qala to Michni and launched search operation. Officials said that two close relatives of a militant named Utarul Haq were arrested and hideout managed by another militant Raheel was destroyed.

    Names of the dead personnel are Subaidar Javed, Taj, Misal Khan, Fazl Amin, Abdel Muhammad, Mera Jan, Muhammad Salman, Ibrahim, Ibrahim, Yousaf Khan, Gulzar, Rehmatullah, Ali Rehman, Taj Muhammad, Ajab Khan and Sher Ali. Their bodies were sent to Mohmand region.

    http://www.dawn.com/wps/wcm/connect...tan/nwfp/eight-policemen-killed-in-mohmand-ts
     

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