NY Times Square bomb attempt

Discussion in 'China' started by ajtr, May 2, 2010.

  1. AirforcePilot

    AirforcePilot Defence Professionals Defence Professionals

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    Hopefully Obama will be a one term president.
     
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  2. ajtr

    ajtr Veteran Member Veteran Member

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    We pray that Obama gets 2nd term too .it will make our ascent easy.More india stays away from usa more it protects india from becoming another pakistan due to usa meddling in the region.And obama is accomplising that job better for india.
     
  3. sob

    sob Moderator Moderator

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    Obama is putting too much on withdrawl of troops from Afganistan. For this he is willing to make a deal with the devil also. True measure of a leader is based on the tough decisions he takes for the sake of his nation and not for the approval ratings.
     
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  4. Armand2REP

    Armand2REP CHINI EXPERT Veteran Member

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    So it was a Pakistani that did it. I guess those Talib bomb making schools are slipping. Who ever told him to use firecrackers as a detonator are retarded.
     
  5. Singh

    Singh Phat Cat Administrator

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    A Pakistani belonging to an elite military family. His Father is a retired Air Vice Marshall of the PAF and ex- head of CAA (Civil Aviation Authority) and his Father's brother is a retired? Inspector General of the Frontier Corps.
     
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  6. Daredevil

    Daredevil On Vacation! Administrator

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  7. Singh

    Singh Phat Cat Administrator

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    ^^ I guess his mediocrity forced him to do this. Could have never hoped to achieve the status of his illustrious family.
     
  8. ajtr

    ajtr Veteran Member Veteran Member

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    He was financially broke and his house went for foreclosure by the bank as one of the report suggests.He grew up in a feudal luxury back home in Pakistan, with several servants around the house because his dad was a high ranking PAF officer.
    as following report suggests.

    he was miffed because the bank forecloses his house ( He would have been shocked that the bank expected not only the loan capital back but also interest on it) This is not the way things are done in Pakistan. In Pakistan you take a bank loan and then use your contacts to get the bank to write off that loan - simple. (That is what the NRO is seemingly all about - except that it is being used to target the PPP chaps.)What was he expecting? He would bomb times square, hide out in Pakistan for a few months, and then go back and the americans will forgive and forget and accept that he was wronged and take him back in? I'm sure he was convinced this is the way things will pan out!

    No one's proven that Pakistanis are mature or sane yet.

    Moreover he was already on anti terrorism squad watch list for sometime before this incident just like david headly aka daud gilani and tawahur rana. as this report suggests.

     
  9. ajtr

    ajtr Veteran Member Veteran Member

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    5 Missing Links Between the Times Square Bomber and Pakistan, Connected


    As useful idiots go, Faisal Shahzad is proving himself in all directions: the naturalized terrorist who stirs up anti-immigrant fervor; the ex-pat who puts Pakistan back on America's hot seat, the screw-up bomber who almost escapes President Obama's grasp only to be Mirandized (the horror!) upon arrest, the sleeper jihadist who scores a global media bonanza for his handlers back in Waziristan (not a fake name), and the super-talkative detainee still spilling his guts to the G-Men. This numskull's got something for damn near everyone. Hell, I even feel sorry for BP, fortunate as it was to have 53 hours and 20 minutes of semi-relief from non-stop media glare.
    Between Shahzad's purported confession in New York and the skulls you just know are being cracked right now all over Pakistan, we're likely to learn a whole lot more over the next 53 hours. But after taking in Phase One of The Bomb That Didn't Shake the World — and meandering my way through last night's official complaint from Eric Holder's crew — here's a couple truths we know to be self-evident:
    1. Bad people are flying through Pakistan way too easily.
    Just ask the British: For years now, radicalized Pakistanis have developed an uncanny ability to shuttle back and forth between Karachi and London — seemingly at will. If the spooks at MI-5 weren't so good at breaking up terrorist plots, the U.K. would have already suffered some sort of Children of Men-style lockdown by now. And by early Tuesday morning, after Emirates airlines somehow managed to overlook "an important added name" to the no-fly list and provided JFK airport with a real-life version of Die Hard 2, America had been introduced to the terrorist wormhole that is air travel to and from Pakistan. So you can officially add New York to the coastal megacity fraternity — Mumbai included — that's been reached out and touched by Pakistan's scary network of ultra-violent groups.
    2. We've entered the age of small-is-beautiful terrorism.
    Probably. After America and its allies decimated Al Qaeda's central leadership structure after 9/11, many (including myself) have long warned that America was facing a far more decentralized and more aggressively improvising global insurgency. Logically, that spells fewer grand-scale attacks like 9/11 and more quick-and-dirty efforts like Detroit and Times Square. The U.S. attorneys can call it an attempted WMD strike all they want, but Saturday's "destructive device" was really just that — a sloppy-but-inventive IED wrapped with an SUV. And so long as our enemies can continue tapping the disaffected sons of prominent Islamic families, these smaller hits will likely keep on coming — no matter how much the higher-ups in places like Pakistan play along.
    3. It just got a whole lot tougher to be a Pakistani in America.
    The 2000 Census counted over 200,000 Pakistanis residents in this country, but this year's version will likely tally a number roughly three times larger. Upwards of half live in New York and Jersey. Do these numbers say we've let in too many potential sleepers to track? That's a call only Glenn Beck can tearfully make. But clearly, if you and your multiple passports just landed at JFK after five months "visiting the family" in Pakistan and you left the wife and kids back home and your only known, un-foreclosed address is a second-floor place in Connecticut ... well then you're looking at a long conversation with burly, mustachioed men in a windowless room.
    4. It just got a whole lot easier to be a bad cop in the Obama administration.
    Shahzad's jerry-rig may have been buggy, but talk about flawless timing: a car stuffed with what the feds are calling a "weapon of mass destruction" right in the middle of Manhattan less than 48 hours before Mahmoud Ahmadinejad shows up at the U.N. to spout his latest nonsense about Iran's "peaceful" nuclear program? I mean, come on! Does it get any better than that? Then there's the grinding buildup toward our military showdown with the Taliban in Kandahar. And after its Pakistani branch claimed credit for the Times Square plot, d'ya think the Obama administration might just mention Shahzad's name about, oh, a couple thousand times as it explains to the American public why we have to keep up the fight in southern Afghanistan, just down the road and across the border from his admitted bomb training in Waziristan?
    5. It may have gotten even easier for the GOP to complain.
    Don't expect this "terror gap" business to end with Mike Bloomberg, because the GOP will still flog a confident White House as practicing so-called "diplomacy by apology." Granted, nobody got hurt this time or during last Christmas's underwear incident in Detroit, but already a host of prominent Republicans (elected and otherwise) are venting over this close call. Expect many of them to declare that Obama, Holder, and Co. have especially emboldened our enemies in the 9/11 neck of the woods ... and to not-so-subtly link the White House's law-enforcement mindset vis-à-vis terrorism as a "dangerous" rerun of Bill Clinton's last years in office ... which of course put George W. Bush in the clear over 9/11. Amazingly, the president's Nobel Peace Prize will hang around his neck like a political albatross in 2010. And maybe even in 2012.


    Read more: http://www.esquire.com/blogs/politics/times-square-bomber-arrest-050510#ixzz0n3w8ebpb
     
  10. Daredevil

    Daredevil On Vacation! Administrator

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    From the above link

    So, his father is a very rich guy and he would have bailed him out when his son's home went for foreclosure but it seems he didn't help for whatever reasons that we don't know.
     
  11. LETHALFORCE

    LETHALFORCE Moderator Moderator

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    Still no proof that the war on terror is being won, and with Obama's policies victory seems distant.
     
  12. ajtr

    ajtr Veteran Member Veteran Member

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    Thank god it was a failed attempt.Americans must be warned of possible JDAM or dirty bomb attack in any of its cities by some illustrious son of high ranking officer of pakistani armed forces or the some other A.Q.Khan typ nuke scientist himself instead of india..Hope usa will prepare its public psychologically for such emergency situations.There are more chances of nuke attack on usa from terrorists pakistani state then any of the other nuke possessing countries like china and russia.
     
  13. AkhandBharat

    AkhandBharat Regular Member

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    Zakaria: Pakistan is 'epicenter of Islamic terrorism'

    New York (CNN) -- The suspect in the Times Square bombing attempt was caught as he was seeking to flee to Pakistan, a nation that analyst Fareed Zakaria calls the "epicenter of Islamic terrorism."
    "It's worth noting that even the terrorism that's often attributed to the war in Afghanistan tends to come out of Pakistan, to be planned by Pakistanis, to be funded from Pakistan or in some other way to be traced to Pakistan," said Zakaria. He added that Pakistan's connection with terrorist groups goes back decades and has often been encouraged by that nation's military for strategic reasons.

    Faisal Shahzad, a 30-year-old naturalized citizen of Pakistani descent, had recently been trained in bomb making in Pakistan's Waziristan province, according to a federal complaint filed in court Tuesday. CNN reported Tuesday that Faisal Shahzad's father is a retired vice-marshal in the Pakistani Air Force.

    Shahzad was arrested around 11:45 p.m. ET Monday at New York's John F. Kennedy International Airport just before he was to fly to Islamabad, Pakistan, by way of Dubai.

    Zakaria, author and host of CNN's "Fareed Zakaria GPS," spoke to CNN on Tuesday. Here is an edited transcript:

    CNN: Based on what we know so far, what lessons can be learned from this incident?

    Fareed Zakaria: This does not seem to be part of a larger and more organized effort to penetrate the United States. That doesn't mean such efforts are not under way....it does make you realize just how open we are as a country and how open we are as a society. There is always a level of vulnerability that comes from being an open society and this guy, Mr. Shahzad obviously took advantage of that openness.

    CNN: Apparently he traveled to Pakistan on a number of occasions. Does that signal that Pakistan isn't vigilant enough about terrorism?

    Zakaria: Well it certainly signals something that we have known for a while, which is that Pakistan is the epicenter of Islamic terrorism. ... The British government has estimated that something like 80 percent of the terror threats that they receive have a Pakistani connection.
    So there's no question that Pakistan has a terrorism problem. It has radical groups within the country that have the ability to recruit people and have access to resources that makes for a very combustible mixture.
    It should remind us that even when looking at the war in Afghanistan, ultimately the most important place where jihadis are being trained and recruited is not in Afghanistan but in Pakistan. And there's no other part of the world where you have quite the same concentration of manpower, resources and ideology all feeding on each other.

    CNN: What feeds the ideology that drives the terror effort?

    Zakaria: Pakistan has been conducive to this kind of jihadis for a number of reasons. For the last three or four decades, the Pakistani government, the Pakistani military has supported, funded many of these groups in a bid to maintain influence in Afghanistan, in a bid to maintain an asymmetrical capacity against India -- in other words, to try to destabilize India rather cheaply through these militant groups rather than frontally through its army.
    So it has found it useful to have these militant groups and to support them. It has always assumed that these groups will not attack Pakistanis and therefore was not a threat to Pakistan itself. And to a large extent that's true, these groups by and large have attacked people in Afghanistan, India, in the West but not in Pakistan. But that is changing, because these groups are so intermingled and often sufficiently ideological, and also because the Pakistani military is beginning to take them on.
    But fundamentally the reason this has gone on is that there has been a policy of the Pakistani state and particularly the Pakistani military, to encourage these groups, to fund them, to ignore their most pernicious activities. And some of it goes back even further than four decades. In the 1965 war against India, the Pakistanis used Islamic jihadis...
    And the great hope now is that finally the Pakistani government is getting serious about this. Frankly it remains a hope.

    CNN: Why do you say that it's only a hope?

    Zakaria: Over the last few years, it appears that the Pakistani government has begun to understand that these groups all meld together, that they are a threat to a stable and viable modern Pakistani state. But when I talk about the Pakistani government you have to realize that there are different elements in it.
    The Pakistani civilian government really does understand the danger that Islamic terrorism poses to Pakistan, but the civilian government in Pakistan appears quite powerless. Most power lies with the military.
    The military in Pakistan has a somewhat more complex attitude. It does believe that these militants have gone too far. It does believe that it has to take on the militants. And it has actually battled them quite bravely over the last few years.

    CNN: So what's the reason for thinking the military supports militant groups?

    Zakaria: It still holds within it the view that at the end of the day, the United States will leave the region and that they will have to live in a neighborhood which will have a very powerful India and an Afghanistan that is potentially a client state of India's -- and that in order to combat this Indian domination, they need to maintain their asymmetrical capabilities, their militant groups.
    It is interesting to note that Ahmed Rashid, who may be the most respected Pakistani journalist, has reported on the way in which Pakistani government has thwarted and put obstacles in the way of any kind of talks between the Afghan government and the Taliban.
    The message it has sent to the Afghan government is very clear. If you want to have any negotiations with the Taliban, you have to understand that since we are the critical intermediary -- since the Taliban leadership all lives in Pakistan -- the Pakistani military's terms to the Afghan government are, we want you to push back on Indian influence in Afghanistan, we want you to shut down Indian consulates in various Afghan cities.
    In other words, the Pakistani government is still obsessed with the idea of an Indian domination of the region, and they're using their influence with the Taliban to try to counter Indian influence. This is the old game that the Pakistanis have played.
    That's what makes me skeptical that there's been a true strategic revolution in Pakistan... There are still people who believe that there are good terrorists and bad terrorists, and some you can work with to further Pakistan's goals.

    CNN: In the attempted car bombing in Times Square and the Christmas Day attempted bombing, you have two failed plots that don't appear to be highly sophisticated. Does that tell us anything about the terror groups?

    Zakaria: At some level, that tells you about the weakness of the terror groups. You do not have highly organized terrorist groups with great resources and capacity that are able to plan spectacular acts of terrorism the way they were in the 1990s and on 9/11.
    What you have now are more isolated, disorganized lone rangers and while they're obviously very worrying and one has to be extremely vigilant, it is also at some level a sign of the weakness of an organization like al Qaeda that it is not able to do the kind of terrorist attacks it used to.
    To be sure, it's important to be very vigilant and make sure you have groups like al Qaeda on the run. But I don't know that in a free society, you will ever be able to prevent an individual with no background in terrorism who's broken no laws and is radicalized from attempting to make some kind of trouble.

    http://www.cnn.com/2010/OPINION/05/05/zakaria.pakistan.terror/index.html?hpt=T1
     
    Last edited by a moderator: May 5, 2010
  14. Oracle

    Oracle New Member

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  15. AkhandBharat

    AkhandBharat Regular Member

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    NY bomb plot raises questions about Pak military-terror nexus

    Long in thrall of the Pakistani military for geo-political reasons, Washington is finally starting to examine that institution's ties to terrorism following the discovery that failed Times Square bomber Faisal Shahzad also belongs to an elite 'fauji'/diplomatic family as did alleged Mumbai carnage facilitators David Headley and Tawassur Rana.

    Initial reports describe Shahzad as the son of Air Vice Marshal (retd) Baharul Haq, who retired from the Pakistan Air Force in early 90's and later was a senior official in the country's Civil Aviation Authority (CAA). His uncle Maj. Gen. Tajul Haq, is reported to have been inspector general of the Frontier Corps.

    If the family ties are confirmed, analysts says it follows the pattern of mediocre sons from some elite Pakistani families becoming terrorists, a development far removed from the clichéd image of indigent madrassa recruits that is often associated with Pakistani terrorism.

    Headley-Gilani's father was a civil service diplomat, while Rana came from a family of army officers, including brothers serving in the military. Both went to the elite Hasan Abdal Cadet College before migrating to the west.

    Ahmad Rashid, among the foremost experts on extremism in the region, said it was "truly extraordinary, from a Pakistani perspective, is that he (Shahzad) belongs to this country's true blue-blooded establishment" and warned that "US-Pakistan relations are likely to sour dramatically for the Pakistanis" if Shahzad is found to have been trained in bomb-making in Pakistan's badlands it has avoided cracking down on.

    "The fact that his father belonged to the country's ruling elite helped provide a cover that made it virtually impossible to detect his terrorist activities. The fact that he was determined to set off a bomb in the US rather than in Pakistan or in Afghanistan where Westerners have been recruited as suicide bombers makes him Pakistan's first global jihadist," Rashid explained in a commentary.

    In fact, there is now an ongoing re-examination of terrorists' profile in Washington, considering the terrorist groups' avowed intention of using recruits who can easily enter countries like the US and meld into western society. They are more likely to be wearing Dockers than dishdasha, and speak fluent English besides their native language. Some law-makers are talking of tightening immigration, visa, and citizenship rules to stop the infiltration of such 'elite' terrorists.

    While US law-enforcement authorities allowed themselves a brief moment of self-congratulation at the speed with which they zeroed in on Faisal Shahzad, the cold light of the morning has raised deeper questions about his entry to the U.S as a student, his assimilation or otherwise into American society, the process by which he acquired citizenship, and at what point did a 30-year old family man, a father of two infants, turn into a terrorist. Analysts have also noted that he earned an engineering degree (as did Khalid Sheikh Mohammed and Mohammed Atta) before going in for an MBA.

    Some of the answers to these questions lie in Pakistan, where, Shahzad has admitted in initial questioning, he received militant training. U.S investigators are now looking into whether he has ties to terrorist groups such as Tehreek-e-Taliban, Lashkar-e-Taiba, or Jaish-E-Mohammed, or whether he acted alone and was a lone wolf as he claims.

    Of particular interest is his transit through Dubai, which was also Mumbai massacre caser David Headley transit point. The fact that Shahzad gave his nationality as Kashmiri in his latest passport is also being scrutinized for whether he has ties with groups operating there.

    The Shahzad episode has also brought immense scrutiny on the Pakistani establishment, after a brief honeymoon period in which the Obama administration rhapsodized over its sterling role against terrorism. Leading analysts are asking hard questions, including whether the Pakistani military, the real power fronted by a dummy civilian government, has genuinely given up use of terrorism as covert policy given its decades-long neuroses about India.

    "The Pakistani government is still obsessed with the idea of an Indian domination of the region...That's what makes me skeptical that there's been a true strategic revolution in Pakistan... There are still people who believe that there are good terrorists and bad terrorists, and some you can work with to further Pakistan's goals," Newsweek's Fareed Zakaria said on CNN even as the Pakistani fan club in Washington DC kept a discreet silence.

    Describing Pakistan as an "epicenter of Islamic terrorism," an expression the Obama administration has avoided using of late, Zakaria said "it's worth noting that even the terrorism that's often attributed to the war in Afghanistan tends to come out of Pakistan, to be planned by Pakistanis, to be funded from Pakistan or in some other way to be traced to Pakistan," Pakistan's connection with terrorist groups, he said, goes back decades and has often been encouraged by that nation's military for strategic reasons.

    That's something successive recent US administrations have been leery of raising publicly given Washington's dependence on Islamabad to conduct the war not only in Afghanistan, but within Pakistan itself. But the near tragedy in Times Square is likely to jolt the Obama administration from its credulous thrall of what many analysts say is Pakistan's dodgy and selective fight against terrorism.

    http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/world/us/NY-bomb-plot-raises-questions-about-Pak-military-terror-nexus/articleshow/5895172.cms
     
    Last edited: May 6, 2010
  16. AirforcePilot

    AirforcePilot Defence Professionals Defence Professionals

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    I think the guy was trained properly on how to put the bomb together. I think Faisal could not get the proper items to pull it off. It's almost impossible to get the right fertilizer needed, and there is no way he could get his hands on the commercial grade explosives that are needed to blow up the tanks.
     
  17. Singh

    Singh Phat Cat Administrator

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    Pakistani culture esp those of Islamists is not welcoming of new recruits or strangers. Outsiders like Shahzad and other Pakistani Americans are not given access to the inner workings of the islamist outfits for fear of they being on the CIA payroll. In this matter atleast the Islamists are paranoid, so I have reason to believe Mr. Shahzad the mediocre student was an expendable asset. His failed attempt and subsequent capture has done more to help spread terror and infamy of the Islamists.

    ---

    A second point, is USA dumb ? This is the umpteenth attempt at a terror strike against USA from Pakistani elements, what the hell is it doing in Afgahnistan ?
     
  18. Known_Unknown

    Known_Unknown Devil's Advocate Stars and Ambassadors

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    ^^And the US still keeps supporting Pakistan. Hasn't it become obvious that Pakistani society is so infested with extremism and hate for anything they deem un-islamic that they are willing to travel to US, Canada, UK, India, Afghanistan, Italy and other parts of the world to stage attacks? As long as they feel safe under the nuclear weapon capability they have, they cannot be threatened either. The US needs to lead a concerted global effort directed at Pakistan to make them disarm, denounce terrorism, and change their education syllabi to raise liberal, progressive youth, not terrorists. It's not like you don't have leverage. Pakistan is perenially bankrupt, so all you have to do is refuse to extend them any loans the next time they come begging to you unless they accept those criteria.


    Instead of going after Iran, this should be your prime objective......
     
  19. nrj

    nrj Stars and Ambassadors Stars and Ambassadors

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    Chain of Phone Numbers Led Investigators to Bomb Suspect

    WASHINGTON — Investigators discovered the name of the suspect in the failed Times Square bombing because of a telephone number he provided when he returned to the United States from Pakistan in February, a law enforcement official said Wednesday.

    The phone number he gave three months ago was entered in a Customs and Border Protection agency database and came up Monday when investigators were checking the record of calls made to or from the prepaid cellular telephone used by the purchaser — at that point unidentified — of the vehicle used in the failed bombing, the official said.

    When New York police were alerted to the presence of the smoking Nissan Pathfinder and rendered it safe on Saturday night, they started out without any immediate suspects. The owner had evidently taken steps to avoid being identified, buying the vehicle with cash and apparently removing the visible vehicle identification number.

    after the police found the vehicle number on a hidden part of the engine, they tracked down the Connecticut woman who had sold it. While she did not remember the buyer’s name and had no paperwork from the sale, she did have the number of the phone he had used to contact her. That number led to a prepaid cellphone with no registered owner.

    The authorities have said that phone received four calls from Pakistan in the hours before he bought the 17-year-old sport utility vehicle for $1,300. When they ran all the numbers tied to that phone through government databases, the only match they got was the number Mr. Shahzad had given when he returned to the United States on Feb. 3 on an Emirates flight.

    Because he was coming from Pakistan, Mr. Shahzad was pulled aside for secondary screening upon arrival, the authorities said. After a Nigerian man tried to blow up a Northwest Airlines flight bound for Detroit on Dec. 25, the federal government mandated additional screening for all passengers arriving from 14 mostly Muslim countries, including Pakistan. That program has since been dropped in favor of a more selective screening system.

    Source

    It remains to be seen how he got explosives? Appears like a hasty attempt, since the carelessness in the phone numbers reflects absence of diligent planning
     
    Last edited: May 6, 2010
  20. nrj

    nrj Stars and Ambassadors Stars and Ambassadors

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    Times Square Bomb Suspect Was Upset Over Drone Attacks, Source Says

    Pakistani officials tell Fox News that the suspect, Faisal Shahzad, was introduced to Qari Hussain, the No.3 in the top tier leadership of the Pakistani Taliban on his last trip to Pakistan.

    The Pakistani-American man suspected in Saturday's attempted car bombing in New York's Times Square has told authorities he was upset over U.S. drone attacks in Pakistan, especially a drone attack while he was in the country, a U.S. official told Fox News.

    Source

    That is a comfortable answer & Pakistani officials have got all info ready on this guy this early?
    I smell something's setup.
     
    Last edited: May 6, 2010

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