Naxals/Maoists Watch

Discussion in 'Internal Security' started by Daredevil, Apr 12, 2009.

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Should the Indian government use armed forces against the naxals/maoists?

  1. Yes

    72.0%
  2. No

    28.0%
  1. Sandeep0159

    Sandeep0159 Senior Member

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    Seen very good development within CAPFs.
    But we need more of it. Hope Modi 2.0 looks after this and wipes out the menace of naxals.
     
  2. 12arya

    12arya Senior Member Senior Member

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    Romanticizing death, blood and deception – A tale of the Left and Naxalbari

    [​IMG]
    Chinese communist party founder- Mao Zedong
    Engagements3367

    History has always been written by the victors, but the times have changed and so have the idea of history and what it means to be victorious. In today’s socio-economical paradigm, the importance of reincarnating history as a tool to propagate an altered version of the same has become synonymous with the academic and the media elite.

    We as a society put heavy emphasis on education and it has been one of the cornerstones of our civilization. That is precisely why we tend to nod whenever we read or hear a person with decorative academic background and never once do we feel the need to verify or counter-check the claims made by ‘the educated man’.

    This presumption on behalf of the general populous that the ‘educated man’ being above scrutiny and is always rational gives way to snobbish attempts by the elite to manufacture narratives and engineer consent. Nowhere is this more prevalent than in media and academia – Institutions which are responsible for rationalizing young minds and make them informed individuals.


    This phenomenon gets amplified manyfold when it comes to movements of the Left which have been radical and claimed thousands of lives in the past. ‘The educated man’ more often than not will try to depict such murderous movements in a better light and do so in a subtle but substantive way.

    The 1917 ‘revolution’ which, for whatever reason, we in Indian celebrate as this great victory for the proletariat and the workers of the world, was actually a minuscule and contained attempt by a few hundred of Bolsheviks who had next to nothing presence in the vast rural lands of the Zar ruled Russia.

    After taking hold of government offices in the town of ‘Petrograd’, the Bolsheviks with their allies ‘the left socialist revolutionaries’, who were an overwhelming majority in the ‘soviet’, promised free and fair elections and abolished private ownership of the land and proclaimed “rarely has an insurrection succeeded so well”.

    Ironically or rather expectedly the Bolsheviks managed to get only 24% of the votes in the subsequent elections and lost miserably. In the most communist pattern possible, Lenin then ordered the ‘red guard’ (his personal army) to shut down the elected assembly. Following the shutdown, he installed himself as the Dictator and forced Russia into a civil war between red and white communist. What ensued can best be described by quoting the lines of a columnist for the Express Tribune:

    “Everything material was in short supply in the brave new world of Communism. Except for blood, which was the motif of the Revolution. In July 1918 the royal family, including the five children, were shot, bludgeoned and bayoneted to death in the basement of a building in Yekaterinburg. They swapped the Romanovs for the Red Tsars of Communism. All 1917 brought the world was oppression, blood, and tragedy.”

    Now, most of us are not aware of this aspect of the revolution, is because the ‘educated man’ chose to showcase a utopian rendition of the reality.

    American ‘journalist’ John Reed’s eyewitness account of the revolution, “10 days that shook the world”, depicts a gleeful and emotional projection of the revolution and the same has been done by hundreds after him.

    They do not talk about how the sailors of the Kronstadt naval base, who were initially staunch supporters of the revolution, overnight became ‘nationalist paramilitary’ and ‘black hundreds’. They do not talk about how the Red guards killed and imprisoned thousands of these sailors. This partial amnesia is not coincidental or rare – the same pattern can be seen around the world for every left induced massacre.

    Case in point would be the terrible tale of the Naxalbari movement, which has been morbidly romanticized by generations of people through poems, books, and articles. If one disassociates the romanticizing aspect of the ‘revolution’ which we as younger generation look for be it in a woman, war or revolution, it was an appalling secessionist movement which claimed thousands of young lives.

    From the initial days, the connection and influence of China were apparent. The main ideologues Charu Mazumder and Kanu Sanyal publicly expressed their ideological leaning towards the Chinese Communist Party and their Chairman Mao Zedong.

    In April 1967, Charu Mazumder entrusted his Nepali comrade Krishnabhakta Sharma from Kalimpong with the task of carrying eight documents which Mazumder believed to be ‘guiding principles of the planned revolution’, to China. After 52 days of travelling, Sharma reached the offices of CPC. He came back with a copy of ‘the red book’ signed by Mao.

    When the uprising broke out, CPC mouthpiece ‘People’s Daily’ published in its July 5th 1967 edition the infamous article titled “Spring Thunder over India” openly lending their support to the band of ‘revolutionaries’ that Mazumder has formed. The article pointed out the inner division of the then undivided communist party and much like the old tradition of communists, here also the fight would eventually devolve between Chinese and Indian communists and impressionable young minds would be sacrificed at the sacrosanct altar of communism.

    The article stated:

    “A peal of spring thunder has crashed over the land of India. Revolutionary peasants in the Darjeeling area have risen in rebellion. Under the leadership of a revolutionary group of the Indian Communist Party, a red area of rural revolutionary armed struggle has been established in India. This is a development of tremendous significance for the Indian people’s revolutionary struggle.”

    This section of the article points out the earlier mentioned inner rift between the different sects within the undivided communist party of India-

    “The Indian reactionaries are panic-stricken by the development of the rural armed struggle in Darjeeling. They have sensed imminent disaster and they wail in alarm that the peasants’ revolt in Darjeeling will “become a national disaster.” Imperialism and the Indian reactionaries are trying in a thousand and one ways to suppress this armed struggle of the Darjeeling peasants and nip it in the bud. The Dange renegade clique and revisionist chieftains of the Indian Communist Party are vigorously slandering and attacking the revolutionaries in the Indian Communist Party and the revolutionary peasants in Darjeeling for their great exploits. The so-called “non-Congress” government in West Bengal openly sides with the reactionary Indian Government in its bloody suppression of the revolutionary peasants in Darjeeling. This gives added proof that these renegades and revisionists are running dogs of U.S. imperialism and Soviet revisionism and lackeys of the big Indian landlords and bourgeoisie. What they call the “Non-Congress government” is only a tool of the landlords and bourgeoisie.”

    After the Naxalites formed a party and named it CPI (Marxist-Leninist) on April 1969 the activities of this organization became much more coordinated and they started to target the educated youth of Kolkata (then Calcutta). They started publishing a monthly propaganda publication called ‘LIBERATION’ which carried articles written by Mazumder himself.

    As a result of the inciting nature of this publication, it was forfeited by the Calcutta Police by a notification in the Calcutta Police Gazette of September 18th, 1969. The streets of Kolkata and the walls of the city were covered with graffiti proclaiming Mao Zedong as the people’s chairman, A phrase coined by Charu himself in one of his articles.

    In response, in their first congress CPI (M-L) in May 1970 the party called upon its followers to launch an attack on the police and seize their arms to build up an arsenal. By the end of October 1970, at least twenty five policemen were killed, and three hundred and fifty injured in these urban actions by the Naxalites.

    The targeting of the Policemen went to such alarming level that Calcutta Police Gazette on 22nd October 1970 The then police Commissioner R.K.Gupta issued an order.

    The order read:

    “Going to cinemas, theatres or in such functions where officers and men are to stay for a considerable period of time, should be avoided. In this regard even if the family members are insistent, they should be dissuaded from such simple desires of theirs….”

    The entire city of Calcutta was transformed into a battle-zone. Curfews, violence and picket points went up throughout the city. Eventually, Charu was captured by the Calcutta Police on 16th July 1972. He died of a heart attack on 28th July 1972.

    Charu famously stated:

    “He is not a true Communist who has not dipped his hands in the blood of the class enemy.”

    The dream of armed revolution and toppling the state did not actualize and it can be argued that the leaders did realize that from the very beginning that the Chinese used them as their proxies to further their own narrative in the Indian sub-continent.

    The real tragedy, however, is the loss of young lives. Thousands of students from eminent universities in Calcutta joined their ranks, brain-washed by the pamphlets and romanticization of revolution.

    A prime example for which can be found in the statement of historian Dilip Simeon, Simeon was a student in St. Stephens College, New Delhi when he dropped out to join Mazumder. He states:

    “(1968) was the year of the Prague Spring, the Tet offensive by the National Liberation Front in Vietnam, the May uprising by students and workers in France, the assassination of Martin Luther King, the Cultural Revolution in China, the Black Power salute by US athletes at the Mexico Olympics.”

    Till this day, this idea is being kept alive by people who still harbour anti-state feelings and the ‘educated man’ is always more than happy to lend support in forms of literature that makes treason a matter of pride, and death, a yearning. What we see today is a repeat of the very propaganda that painted Calcutta red. If we aren’t careful, 1969 is not far from being repeated. After all, those who don’t learn from history are doomed to repeat it.
     
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  3. 12arya

    12arya Senior Member Senior Member

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    Kamal Haasan claims that the word ‘Hindu’ didn’t exist before the Mughals: Here is the truth
    For the past few days, Kamal Haasan has been at the centre of a controversy over his comments on Godse, where he claimed that Godse was independent India's first 'Hindu terrorist'. Following which the BJP had filed a complaint with the EC for violating the Model Code of Conduct.

    On Friday, Makkal Needhi Maiam (MNM) founder Kamal Haasan claimed that the word ‘Hindu’ is not native to India and that it didn’t exist before the arrival of the Mughals. Haasan made the claim in a statement in Tamil posted on Twitter.

    Haasan claimed that the word ‘Hindu’ was never used in the Shavaite and Vaishnaivite writings by ancient saints. “The 12 Alwars ( ancient Vaishnavite saints) or 63 Nayanmars (Ancient Shaivite saints) did not make a reference about the word Hindu anywhere, We were named as Hindus by Mughals or other foreign rulers who came before Mughals. The Britishers who ruled us followed and endorsed the same word” read the statement.

    Explaining why the word ‘Hindu’ should not be used, the statement further read, “It is ignorant on our part to use a name given by non-native rulers when we had our own identity. The identity of ours is Indian, it could be the latest one, But that is the one which will last forever. It is not good to confine the whole broader nation into a religion set up, it will mess up the commerce, polity and spirituality. In normal terms: Living with unity will have crores of benefits – this is a famous Tamil saying which is been repeated many times for Tamils.”


    Kamal Haasan’s statements on the word ‘Hindu’ is not entirely true, the word has been in usage before the arrival of the Mughals as pointed out by popular Twitter handle TrueIndology. He mentions how Swami Vidyaranya, founding Guru of the Vijayanagara empire in the 14th century, much before the Mughals, had used the word ‘Hindus’.

    “One who reveres Omkara, worships cow and keeps away from Himsa is called a Hindu”, he has said.

    Since ancient times India was known as the ‘land of seven rivers’ or ‘Sapta Sindhus’, finding mention in the ancient texts of Rig Veda. The word ‘Hindu’ is derived from the word ‘Sindhu’. This is because the letter ‘s’ in Sanskrit is some times changed to ‘h’ in some Prakrit languages. The same was the case with the Persians who had mentioned in the Avesta, the religious texts of the Zoroastrians, the word ‘Sapta Sindhu’ as ‘Hapta Hindu’.

    [​IMG]
    Essentials of Hindutva – V.D. Savarkar
    The people of India were referred to as ‘Sindhus’ or ‘Hindus’ by both Indians and non-Indians. The Persians referred us as ‘Hindus’, the Greeks later dropped the harsh accent and called Indos which later came to be known as Indians. We were also known as Hindus or Shintus by the Chinese.

    [​IMG]
    Essentials of Hindutva – V.D. Savarkar
    The word, thus, ‘Hindu’ refers to the inheritors of the ancient civilization who have inhabited the ‘land of the seven rivers’ since thousands of years. It now describes people who still follow the traditions which were born in this sacred land.

    For the past few days, Kamal Haasan has been at the centre of a controversy over his comments on Godse, where he claimed that Godse was independent India’s first ‘Hindu terrorist’. Following which the BJP had filed a complaint with the EC for violating the Model Code of Conduct.
     
  4. Srinivas_K

    Srinivas_K Senior Member Senior Member

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    Lok Sabha Election season is over , and local politics of TN do not have BJP influence. This guy will go back to his normal life.
     
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  5. bhramos

    bhramos Elite Member Elite Member

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  6. bhramos

    bhramos Elite Member Elite Member

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  7. Holy Triad

    Holy Triad Senior Member Senior Member

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    DNA Edit: Navlakha disclosures - Urban Naxals are liaising with anti-nationals
    The Indian security establishment has since believed that with ageing leadership, Maoists have been looking at cities and towns for guidance.


    Urban Naxals is an old Maoist formulation to focus on India’s urban centres for leadership to help organise masses, build a united front and engage in military tasks for the cause of a revolution. In 2004, the then highly influential CPI (Maoist), which signified a nationwide guerilla movement gathering momentum, published a document titled ‘Urban Perspective’, which elaborates on this strategy with one of the most important focus areas being gaining leadership from urban areas.

    The Indian security establishment has since believed that with ageing leadership, Maoists have been looking at cities and towns for guidance. Naturally, this is in line with the tradition that most Urban Naxals are well-educated people from India’s top universities and colleges and include leading civil rights activists, writers and an entire ecosystem that has provided a steady stream of ‘revolutionaries’ to the cause.

    As a matter of fact, the original Naxalbari movement in the late 1960s itself came from the ranks of Calcutta’s elite liberal intelligentsia. The Urban Naxals describe themselves as agents of change, whose final act of revenge on the system is to overthrow it and establish a new order. They do not buy the line that they are anti-national. That is why revelations about one of their foremost leaders, activist Gautam Navlakha, is further confirmation they are not above sleeping with the enemy.


    The Pune Police has told the Bombay High Court that Navlakha, an accused in the riots that took place in Bhima-Koregaon, and the Naxal groups that he was linked with have been in touch with Pakistan’s terror outfit Hizbul Mujahideen and Kashmiri separatists. They received weapons from the terrorist organisation during the Bhima-Koregaon violence in 2018. Incriminating evidence retrieved from the laptops of his fellow travellers and co-accused, Rona Wilson and Surendra Gadling, suggest that Navlakha and his group had conducted talks with Hizbul leaders.

    In fact, Navlakha had been liaising with banned terror outfits based out of Pakistan since 2011. The police say he was also in touch with separatists like Syed Ali Shah Geelani and Shakil Bakshi between 2011 and 2014. Geelani and Bakshi, mind you, are loath to talk to any brand of Indians, yet they thought it fit to entertain Navlakha.

    Last year, he was booked under the Unlawful Activities (Prevention) Act (UAPA). On July 5, the high court had granted him interim protection from arrest till July 23, and on Wednesday it was extended till further orders. The police believe that inflammatory speeches at Elgar Parishad conclave in Pune on December 31, 2017 led to violence near the Bhima-Koregaon war memorial the next day, and the Parishad had been supported by Maoists. The UAPA is the law needed to deal with Left-wing violence that has used gullible sections of the population to instigate violence against the state.


    https://www.dnaindia.com/analysis/e...xals-are-liaising-with-anti-nationals-2775755


    @sorcerer @ezsasa @vampyrbladez
     
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  8. Butter Chicken

    Butter Chicken Senior Member Senior Member

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    7 Naxals killed in encounter

     
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  9. ssg_slayer

    ssg_slayer Director at Search & Troll Wing - STW

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    keep a watch on this thread as well. May be more news going to come.
     
  10. Butter Chicken

    Butter Chicken Senior Member Senior Member

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    5 Naxals killed in Chattisgarh


     
  11. vampyrbladez

    vampyrbladez Senior Member Senior Member

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  12. 12arya

    12arya Senior Member Senior Member

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    Are Naxals Amit Shah's next target?

    After fulfilling long-standing demand of the RSS-BJP by scrapping special status of Jammu and Kashmir, it seems Union Home Minister Amit Shah is turning his attention to Naxal insurgency.
    [​IMG]
    Union Home Minister Amit Shah held a meeting of chief ministers and police officers on Monday to review Naxal situation and counter-Naxal operations in the affected states. (Photo: PTI)


    The Narendra Modi government has been on a spree, in its second term, to fulfil long-pending demands of the Rashtriya Swayamsevak Sangh (RSS). Scrapping the special status of Jammu and Kashmir and a law to ban instant triple talaq among Muslims are the prime examples. Now whispers in the corridors of power signal that next in line could be the left-wing extremism or Naxalism as it is commonly known.

    The RSS has been cautious in making its disapproval of Naxal insurgents despite various BJP governments at the Centre and in states taking strong measures to contain left-wing extremism. The RSS has favoured a multi-pronged strategy to counter Naxalism. In recent times, the RSS-BJP leadership has been extremely critical of what their supporters call "Urban Naxals".

    In October last year, RSS chief Mohan Bhagwat launched a book titled, Kaun Hain Urban Naxals (Who Are Urban Naxals). It was published by Vishwa Samvad Kendra, the communication and publication wing of the RSS. A month earlier, Bhagwat had released a booklet on Naxalism asking people to identify and expose "Urban Naxals". The right-wing supporters consider them as allies of Naxalism in the country.

    The RSS has been trying to turn the red corridor into a saffron patch. A bigger mandate in the 2019 Lok Sabha has given the RSS-BJP leadership confidence that the people are ready for the change. Naxalism powered by an extreme left ideology also poses an obstacle to the RSS's ultimate objective of making a homogenous Indian society.

    Scrapping of the special status of Jammu and Kashmir and Articles 370 and 35A, and making instant triple talaq a punishable criminal offence, a part of the objective has been achieved. Naxalism becomes the automatic next target for the BJP-led government.

    Union Home Minister Amit Shah held a meeting of chief ministers and police officers from 10 Naxal-affected states in this regard on Monday. Incidentally, this was the first meeting of state leaders called by Amit Shah since taking over as Union home minister in May this year.

    The 10 Naxal violence-hit states are Chhattisgarh, Jharkhand, Odisha, West Bengal, Bihar, Maharashtra, Telangana, Andhra Pradesh, Madhya Pradesh and Uttar Pradesh. Chief ministers of all except West Bengal, Telangana and Maharashtra attended the meeting called to review the counter-Naxal strategy.

    After the meeting, Amit Shah wrote on Twitter, "Had a very fruitful meeting with the CMs of the LWE affected states. Discussed several issues related to the security & development of these states. Left Wing Extremism is against the idea of democracy and under the leadership of PM @narendramodi we are committed to uproot it."

    This move to review the Naxal situation and counter-Naxal operations come days after the government set up a panel to implement benefits, announced in July, for the Central Armed Police Forces (CAPFs). The beneficiary forces are CRPF, CISF, BSF, ITBP and SSB. They will be given non-financial functional upgradation (NFFU) grade and categorised as an organised group A service.

    These are the forces that are deployed in anti-Naxal and counter-terror operations, and carry out counter-insurgency tasks besides guarding the international borders. This is significant to keep the forces fighting insurgents in good morale. More than 11,000 serving officers will be benefited from this move.

    Though the government has claimed success in counter-Naxal operations in the past five years, there is speculation that the Union home ministry under Amit Shah is about to unveil a recast counter-Naxal plan.

    According to home ministry statistics, there has been 43.4 per cent reduction in the incidents of Naxal violence under the Modi government. Compared to 8,782 cases of Naxal violence during 2009-13, only 4,969 cases were reported during 2014-18.

    In terms of death of people including security personnel in Naxal violence, there has been a decline of 60 per cent since 2014. Against 3,326 people losing their lives during 2009-13 in Naxal violence, 1,321 people were killed during 2014-18 in similar incidents.

    Left-wing extremism was reported in 60 districts in 2018. Of these, according to the government, only 10 districts account for two-thirds of the total Naxal violence. The government has rolled out a development plan with annual allocation of Rs 1,000 crore in Naxal-affected districts for building key infrastructure and public services.

    Both Article 370 in Jammu and Kashmir, and triple talaq were mentioned in the BJP's election manifesto for 2019 Lok Sabha polls. Combating Naxalism was also part of the manifesto. During election campaign, Prime Minister Narendra Modi had told a rally at Sagar in Madhya Pradesh that he had taken a "vow to avenge every drop of martyrs" and for that "we have to free this country from the menace of terrorism and Naxalism."
     
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  13. 12arya

    12arya Senior Member Senior Member

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    Urban Naxals case accused Gautam Navlakha had links with Hizbul, states Rona Wilson's report

    The report reportedly prepared by Maoist cadres was recovered by Pune police while they were trying to retrieve old documents from laptops of the other arrested accused.

    [​IMG]
    Gautam Navlakha (File photo | PTI)

    The Pune police on Wednesday filed a report in connection with the Urban Naxals case accused Gautam Navlakha's petition which hinted at his links with Hizbul Mujahideen in Kashmir.

    The report reportedly prepared by Maoist cadres was recovered by Pune police while they were trying to retrieve old documents from laptops of the other arrested accused.

    According to the report which has been recovered from the laptop of Urban Naxals case accused Rona Wilson, Gautam Navlakha named as GN in the report was in touch with several separatists in Kashmir and some commanders of Hizbul Mujahideen.

    The report reportedly written in 2013 mentions that Navlakha made several trips to Kashmir and met Shakil Bakshi, a HM commander.

    Later, he was also in touch with Parvez Khan who was earlier a Hizbul commander and then turned double agent. Navalakha met HM commander on behalf of Maoists to exchange arms and ammunition and also to help, but Maoist leadership reporter had no idea about it.

    Also, he sent Khan to meet Maoist commander in Delhi on behalf of HM but Maoist fact finding team found that Khan was a double agent. HM reportedly wanted to establish a relation with Maoists in order to get access to Myanmar border areas to secure weapons.

    The report also states that Gautam Navlakha was working for the government and against Maoists on many occasions.

    He spoke against the Maoist movement and also tried to force them into accepting offers from the UPA government. The report talks about his meetings with Sonia Gandhi and Ilena Sen, wife of Binayak Sen and Chidambaram for his release from jail in 2009.
     
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  14. 12arya

    12arya Senior Member Senior Member

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    Checking urban Naxalism
    Late last month, the Maharashtra police arrested five prominent activists in connection with an ongoing investigation related to the Bhima-Koregaon caste flare up in January this year. Earlier in June, the Maharashtra police had arrested five more activists claimed to have close contacts with Naxals and allegedly involved in organising a public meeting right before the Bhima-Koregaon caste riots broke out. In addition, the police then had presented a sensational letter implicating all five accused in hatching a plot to assassinate the Prime Minister of India.

    While the case is being heard by courts and the police investigation is still underway, the manner and method in which the police conducted the raids and arrested these well-known activists naming them as “urban Naxals” raises vital questions about the new labeling by the state and the soundness of current counter-insurgency strategy to target Naxals and their ideology. Who are the “urban Naxals” and how serious is their threat that is forcing the Indian state to take such desperate measures?

    Urban Naxals: An old wine in new bottle?
    Left-wing extremism (LWE) or Maoism, which took most regions of the world by storm in the 1950s, is today a spent force. In fact, it has nearly disappeared from the country of its origin i.e. China. Yet, its ideological appeal and Chairman Mao’s call for establishing the Proletariat State by "overthrowing semi-colonial bourgeoisie state" continues to attract followers and revolutionaries across many parts of the world. In India, while LWE has remained largely a rural phenomenon, yet since its appearance in the 1960s, the movement has been drawing great following and leadership from the urban areas, especially from highly educated dreamers and romantics. For instance, Charu Mazumdar and Kanu Sanyal, two original architects of Naxalbari revolt in 1967, were from affluent and non-rural background. While Charu Mazumdar came from an affluent Bengali peasant background and lived in the adjoining town called Siliguri, Kanu Sanyal was a high-caste Bengali refugee who spent most of his prime in city. Majority of the present leaders such as Ganapathy, Muppalla Laxman Rao, Kobad Ghandy, Anuradha Ghandy, Saketh Rajan, Sridhar Shriniwasan, Ravi Sarma and B. Anuradha are also from cities and have left behind their comfortable lives to struggle for the poor and the exploited out of ideological commitment.

    While there is little doubt about the strong attraction of this utopian ideology among the highly educated urban youth, what has been the extent of its penetration in urban areas so far? It is well known among analysts tracking LWE that for logistics and reasons of getting trapped by the security forces, Maoists have been avoiding urban surge for a long time. However, in the recent decade, particularly after the merger of 40 odd splinter insurgent groups in 2004 leading to the creation of a new group called the Communist Party of India (Maoist), the new formation brought out two major documents detailing their urban ambition. ‘The Strategies and Tactics of Indian Revolution in 2004’ and ‘Urban Perspective: Our Works in Urban Areas in 2007’ spelled out strategies and tactics to spread into urban areas and create an elaborate network of underground and over-ground support for the armed movement.

    With regard to their successes, there have hardly been any noteworthy achievements in all these years. At the most, Maoists have been able to form urban cells in the industrial belts of Raipur, Durg, Surat, Faridabad and Bastar. Also, there have been reports indicating their strong gains in semi-urban centres such as Haryana’s Yamuna Nagar which has several sugar mills, timber and wine mills with history of labour unrest. The most predominant and visible modes of penetration appear to be infiltration into protests, agitations or demonstrations carried out against the government in urban areas. A clear demonstration of their strength was seen in places like Nandigram and Singur in West Bengal where they reportedly played a critical role in instigating and spreading unrest. Though the Maoists have not attacked any city centres directly, numerous attacks have happened in areas close to urban centres. For instance, the attack in Nayagarh and Daspalla towns in Orissa on 15 February 2008 and the attack against the Orissa State Armed Police camp at R. Udayagiri town in Gajapati district of Orissa on 24 March 2006 are a few such examples. Such attacks, however, remain few and scattered with the Naxalites focusing on covert operations in urban areas instead. Similarly, attacks in Aurangabad/Jehanabad jail in Bihar is a clear reminder of Maoist threats in urban areas.

    However, their urban surge has proved a disaster for them as they lost many of their top leaders. Their ideologues like Narayan Sanyal, Amitabh Bagchi, Kobad Ghandy were arrested by security forces from their urban hidings. From many credible sources, including surrendered Maoists and the security forces, urban fallouts and massive losses in the “heartland” in the last few years have made Maoists to retreat and abandon their urban ambitions to cope with difficult time.

    In the last four years, the Bharatiya Janata Party (BJP) government at the Centre has done well to bring down LWE to 30 districts. According to official record, from once invincible 180 districts spread in 2011, their domination has been practically reduced to two States: Chhattisgarh and Jharkhand. In short, LWE’s influence is virtually restricted to tri-junction regions of Madhya Pradesh, Maharashtra and Chhattisgarh. As a result, in April this year, the Union Home Ministry took a significant decision to remove 44 districts from the list of LWE. A combination of measures, including building roads in interior areas, greater surveillance, frequent combing operations and greater troop movements into LWE districts, have resulted in delivering massive blows to ultras. This year itself, as many as 140 Maoists have been neutralised by the security forces, while several thousands have surrendered in last four years.

    Comparative statistics of Naxal violence (2005-2018)

    Years Civilians Security Force Personnel LWE/ CPI-Maoists Total
    2005
    281 150 286 717
    2006 266 128 343 737
    2007 240 218 192 650
    2008 220 214 214 648
    2009 391 312 294 997
    2010 626 277 277 1180
    2011 275 128 199 602
    2012 146 104 117 367
    2013 159 111 151 421
    2014 128 87 99 314
    2015 93 57 101 251
    2016 120 66 244 430
    2017 109 74 150 333
    2018 80 57 179 316
    Total* 3137 1983 2846 7966
    Source:
    South Asia Terrorism Portal, Data till 9 September, 2018.

    Thus, at a time when the Maoist ideology is losing its appeal worldwide (signified by recent Colombia peace process) and security forces enjoy an overwhelming lead over LWE leadership and cadre (see the Table), should the state need to hound a handful of activists in the name of urban Naxals? Such hasty and ill-conceived action of the state would help perpetuate the myth of their spread and relevance. As a noted observer of the movement observed, “an underground insurgent needs a mythical aura. An insurgency is as much a reality as it is the product of myths that society weaves around the insurgent”. It is time the Indian state stay away from raising the ghost of an almost dying ideology and should not waste opportunity to root out this five-decade-long insurgency.
     
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