Chinese Dissident Wins Nobel Peace Prize

Discussion in 'China' started by tarunraju, Oct 8, 2010.

  1. Sridhar

    Sridhar House keeper Moderator

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  2. Sridhar

    Sridhar House keeper Moderator

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    President calls for release of Nobel laureate


    • Publication Date:10/11/2010
    • Source: Taiwan Today
    • By Kwangyin Liu
    President Ma Ying-jeou has called on mainland China to release imprisoned Nobel Peace Prize Laureate Liu Xiaobo, saying that Beijing should learn to be more tolerant of political dissidents.
    The president made the remarks at a reception of overseas Taiwan nationals in Taipei Oct. 9, a day after the Norwegian Nobel Committee awarded Liu the prize.
    “Freedom of speech is a universal value,” Ma said, noting that Taiwan approved in 2009 the United Nations International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights and the International Covenant on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights.
    “We hope that mainland China will show more respect to its political dissidents, so as to live up to its ambition for a peaceful rise,” he added.
    Liu Xiaobo, a 54-year-old writer who has repeatedly called for democratic reforms in mainland China, is currently serving an 11-year sentence on subversion charges handed down Dec. 25, 2009.
    The Norwegian Nobel Committee said in a statement it was giving Liu the prize in recognition of “his long and non-violent struggle for fundamental human rights in China.” (HZW)



    Taiwan Today
     
  3. Sridhar

    Sridhar House keeper Moderator

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    New Directives from the Ministry of Truth, October 8, 2010 (RE: Liu Xiaobo wins Nobel Peace Prize)

    The following examples of censorship instructions, issued to the media and/or Internet companies by various central (and sometimes local) government authorities, have been leaked and distributed online. Chinese journalists and bloggers often refer to those instructions as “Directives from the Ministry of Truth.” CDT has collected the selections we translate here from a variety of sources and has checked them against official Chinese media reports to confirm their implementation.
    The editors of the Ministry of Truth blog congratulate Liu Xiaobo in winning the Nobel Peace Prize!
    October 8, 2010
    All websites are to delete special topics on the prize: “Websites are not to create news items or exclusive stories on the Nobel Prize. Exclusive stories that do exist must all be deleted.”
    The latest directive from the Central Propaganda Bureau: “Standard copy on Liu Xiaobo winning the Nobel Peace Prize has been approved for distribution, but all media outlets are not allowed to publish it. This includes all print and online media.”
    The Office of Information of the State Council has issued a directive regarding Liu Xiaobo winning the Nobel Peace Prize: Set into place the prohibited words on all micro-blogs; on-line forums, blogs and other interactive platforms are all forbidden from transmitting them. The Xinhua News Agency will shortly circulate copy.
    真理部博客编辑祝贺刘晓波获诺贝尔和平奖!
    各网站删除诺贝尔奖专题 “有关诺贝尔奖事各网站不要制作新闻专题,已有的专题一律撤除。”
    中宣部最新指令: (有关刘晓波获得诺贝尔和平奖)通稿照发,但所有媒体不得登载。含一切纸媒、网媒
    国新办有关刘晓波获得诺贝尔和平奖最新指示:全国所有微博设置严禁词,论坛博客等互动环节一律禁止传播。稍后新华社会有通稿
    Read more about the “Ministry of Truth” via CDT:
    In China, several political bodies are in charge of Internet content control. At the highest level, there is the Central Propaganda Department, which ensures that media and cultural content follows the official line as mandated by the CCP. Then there is the State Council Information Office (SCIO), which has established “Internet Affairs Bureau” to oversee all Websites that publish news, including the official sites of news organizations as well as independent sites that post news content.
    This “Internet Affairs Bureau,” sent out very specific instructions to all large news websites daily, and often multiple times per day. Those instructions do not always mean that related contents are completely banned online, but they instruct websites to highlight or suppress certain type of opinions or information in a very detailed manner.
    Chinese journalists and bloggers often refer to those instructions, as well as other type of censorship orders to media and websites, as “Directives from the Ministry of Truth.” TheMinistry of Truth (or Minitrue, in Newspeak) is one of the four ministries that govern Oceania in George Orwell’s novel Nineteen Eighty-Four. In the Chinese blogosphere, it is the online nickname for the Central Propaganda Department and generally speaking, all other subordinate propaganda agencies including Internet supervision departments.
    Today, it’s been said that news does not break, it tweets. For the officials in the the Ministry of Truth, the news is that their supposedly confidential instructions get tweeted as well.


    New Directives from the Ministry of Truth, October 8, 2010 (RE: Liu Xiaobo wins Nobel Peace Prize) | China Digital Times (CDT)




    Julia Lovell: Beijing Values the Nobels. That’s Why This Hurts

    [​IMG]From the Independent:
    Most years, Chinese scholars, politicians and journalists worry that a Nobel Prize has never been awarded to a Chinese person while resident in China. Ethnically Chinese scientists have won only for breakthroughs made outside their country of birth. The only literature prize given to a Chinese writer was given in 2000 to Gao Xingjian, who now lives in Paris, and whose novels openly denounce Communist policies.
    The Chinese government’s stony response to yesterday’s award to the veteran dissident Liu Xiaobo is partly soured by recollections of previously thwarted Nobel ambitions. But its main concern is not external, but internal, as many Chinese people who would not otherwise necessarily have heard of Liu and his pro-democracy Charter 08 will probably now do so.
    Responses to Liu (and his prize) have been vigorously censored in China. But the renowned “Great Firewall” of internet control is porous. Minutes after the announcement of Liu’s prize, well-informed Chinese microbloggers were buzzing with jubilation. The Nobel Prize is an award that enjoys unique global prestige: within China, it is often seen as an impartial, international source of recognition. That a dissident of Liu Xiaobo’s stature has been honoured is bound to alarm the Beijing government.
    Julia Lovell is the author of ‘The Politics of Cultural Capital: China’s Quest for a Nobel Prize in Literature’
    The following cartoon is from Guangzhou based cartoonist Li Xiaoguai (Blogtd):
     
  4. ajtr

    ajtr Veteran Member Veteran Member

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    Not all Chinese dissidents happy with Liu’s Nobel


    AFP, WASHINGTON
    Liu Xiaobo (劉曉波) has instantly achieved global icon status by winning the Nobel Peace Prize, but some dyed-in-the-wool Chinese dissidents are crying foul, seeing the award as a victory for a more moderate, accommodating brand of activism.
    Liu, the first Chinese citizen to win the Nobel Peace Prize, is a 54-year-old writer imprisoned since December after authoring Charter 08, a manifesto signed by thousands seeking greater rights in the communist nation.
    Wei Jingsheng (魏京生) — who spent nearly two decades in prison and is often seen as the father of China’s modern democracy movement — said Liu was more acceptable to the Nobel committee and even Beijing because he worked within the system.
    However, Wei said China showed no sign of changing.
    “Raising the reputation of moderate reformists would increase people’s desire to cooperate with the government, thus helping stabilize the political situation in China and delaying the time when people overthrow the dictatorial government,” Wei said in Washington, where he lives in exile.
    Wei, 60, a former electrician at the Beijing zoo, was sentenced to death row after boldly putting up a poster seeking democracy in 1979. He was finally freed after intervention by then-US president Bill Clinton. Wei was himself often tipped for the Nobel Peace Prize in the past.
    He said “tens of thousands” of Chinese other than Liu deserved the award, including Gao Zhisheng (高智晟), a missing human rights lawyer, and Chen Guangcheng (陳光誠), who exposed abuses in Beijing’s one-child policy.
    In a controversial move, a group of exiled Chinese — not including Wei — wrote an open letter to the Nobel committee calling Liu unsuitable for the prize.
    Diane Liu (劉曉東), who blogs under the penname San Mei (三妹) and helped organize the letter, faulted Liu for not highlighting the treatment of the Falun Gong spiritual movement, which she called China’s worst human rights problem.
    The Falun Gong says it has suffered systematic persecution, including imprisonment and death, since it was banned in 1999.“The Nobel Prize is for people who speak for human rights. He is not that person,” said Liu, who lives in Chicago. “He deceives the Western world because they don’t read Chinese and they don’t know how tricky the Chinese communist regime plays its game.”
    To be sure, many dissidents have saluted Liu Xiaobo. Harry Wu (吳弘達), a Washington-based activist who spent nearly two decades in Chinese labor camps, has led a campaign on social media urging his freedom.
    “Liu Xiaobo didn’t organize a party, he didn’t take action, he just said what his ideals were and got 11 years in a prison camp. So that has exposed what the country is and what we can do,” Wu said.
    Timothy Cheek, an expert on Chinese intellectuals at the University of British Columbia in Vancouver, said the Nobel committee faced an “invidious choice” in choosing only one dissident worthy of the prize.
    Paradoxically, Cheek said that Liu Xiaobo may have had an advantage because he is in jail, giving the award more of an impact than if it had gone to a former prisoner such as Wei or Wu.
    “Liu Xiaobo is an important Chinese intellectual because he does two things — he criticizes the government and he lives in China. And in order to do that and not be dead, you have to make compromises,” Cheek said.
    “He’s a democrat, he’s a human rights activist — that’s what he’s after, but he’s willing to make tactical adjustments in order to be effective and the most important one has been remaining inside China,” Cheek said.
    “Yes, he hasn’t been as emphatic or hasn’t addressed topics we have addressed internationally,” Cheek said. “But we don’t live in China and we don’t have the police coming around the corner.”
     
  5. Iamanidiot

    Iamanidiot Elite Member Elite Member

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    The CCP sucks absolutely sucks in PR .By detaining the dissidents wife and even giving a horrible press release from the foreign affairs ministry it shot itself in the foot.The CCP is being centered on the issues it wants to avoid the most a case of killing the messenger instead of the message.Wow!simply wow

    Lei Xiaobao has been made into some sort of nelson mandela right now an eyesore for then south african regime just like now
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Oct 11, 2010
  6. luke

    luke Regular Member

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    Lol,just read his article.He love America more than American.As for his political opinion,too stupid and naive!
     
  7. amoy

    amoy Senior Member Senior Member

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    ya, to a degree.

    Liu's ideas, such as '300 hundred years of colonizaton for China' :happy_8:

    The ill attitude/PR Beijing takes simply put him under more limelight he probably doesn't derserve :happy_2:

    U Indians probably think CCP is to collapse with a Boris Yeltsin or Liu. Or China is a country of 'cheap export' blah blah.

    Open your mind for a changing China (and world at large) and don't be a frog in the well :emot180:
     
  8. Iamanidiot

    Iamanidiot Elite Member Elite Member

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    No indians wants another Taipeng rebellion in China.Nor Iam expecting a collapse of the CCP .The thing Iam seeing right now is CCP is not the same as it was in Dengs regime or Mao's regime.Nor it has the same authority its grip on people seems to be weaker.

    Ohimalaya Iam curious why are you calling me a Koopastha Mandooka?.I generally not an Avid and Rabid China Basher

    But one thing

    It seems middle class chinese are very much afraid of the proletariat
     
    Last edited: Oct 11, 2010
  9. amoy

    amoy Senior Member Senior Member

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    Mikhail Gorbachev also won Nobel 'Peace' Prize. One year after that, USSR collpased ...

    Many transactions happened under the shining flag of 'privitization' and 'liberalization'. Then those ex-Commie officicals turned out to be riche nouveau (neo-bourgeoisie or oligarchy), like Yeltsin family, Berezovsky, Gusinski, Roman Arkadievich Abramovich

    Now the 'reviving' Russia is an exporter of arms, oil and gas, while many once 'leading' industries were gone.

    -- Stories behind the 'peace' prize :funny_2:
     
    Last edited: Oct 11, 2010
  10. Iamanidiot

    Iamanidiot Elite Member Elite Member

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    Don't go on a Tangent .Most of the noveau rich in China are communist officials.USSR was our ally but I will say it was living hell for its residents

    Anyway Ohimalaya why are you calling me a KoopasthaMandooka wish to know why
     
  11. Tshering22

    Tshering22 Sikkimese Saber Senior Member

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    Keep laughing because that's what you can reading People's Daily day and night. Here's the deal; why don't you cross-check it with us? Sikkim was one of the many states that decided to accede to India because of not just security reasons but also cultural unanimity with the country. And of course, PLA was a big threat to us. I won't disrespect the royalty, but they were typical of olden days emperors where the population had to limited in their reach and bogged down. Joining India gave us multiple benefits and we're proud to be Indians. Besides, if you care to read history to Sikkim, you would realize that this isn't the first time we're being part of India. The mountainous roads of our state were part of Indian empires many times before the British and Islamic invaders came. Under Mauryan empire's peak, we were a part of the Indian empire and thanks to that, we're today proud Buddhists alongside mainstream Hindus.

    By the way, your astonishment is equally applicable to the kingdoms of Sinkiang and Tibet. Would you apply your laughter theory for these two as well? How many of us Sikkimese refugees do you find running and coming to your country for "refuge from greedy India"? But we see thousands of refugees every year from Tibet coming to India to seek refuge.

    And please do take the courtesy of going through our state history from our source rather than what CCP tells you. You're curious about us, then why ask a third entity? Ask us directly.

    Face it; we Sikkimese are proud to be Indians and thank the day our Chongyal acceeded to the Union.
     
    Last edited: Oct 11, 2010
  12. Tshering22

    Tshering22 Sikkimese Saber Senior Member

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    Actually Praveen, it wasn't as bad as it was shown by the West. My dad has completed his higher education in USSR and he said that barring the aggressive Communist Atheism and the lack of religious freedom in Arkhangelsk (and rest of USSR), he always said that Soviet was more or less a "be content" kind of a place. Of course there was no political autonomy like here, but more than 'hell' as you say, it was cumbersome. Standing in lines for hours, getting rations, doctors, engineers etc and workers getting almost a similar pay range due to the equality stuff causing dissatisfaction etc. Most people wouldn't talk about politics there apart from say joining the military or taking up jobs (since all jobs were government jobs then).
     
  13. SHASH2K2

    SHASH2K2 New Member

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    Chinese Call Off Meeting With Norwegians

    BEIJING — China on Monday abruptly called off a Shanghai meeting with a Norwegian minister in retaliation for Friday’s award of the Nobel peace prize to imprisoned dissident Liu Xiaobo, a Norwegian official said.

    China had earlier warned Norway that giving the prize to Mr. Liu, who is imprisoned for his pro-democracy writings, would harm bilateral relations. A spokesman for the Norwegian Foreign Ministry told Reuters news service: "I can confirm that the Chinese have canceled the meeting as a reaction to the Nobel Peace Prize."

    Before she left Oslo, Norwegian Fisheries Minister Lisbeth Berg-Hansen told the Norwegian press that any retaliation was unwarranted because the prize committee is independent of the Norwegian government.

    “There is therefore no basis for measures against Norway if someone doesn’t like the prizewinner,” she told the Norwegian daily Dagbladet before leaving for China to commemorate 21 years of exports of Norwegian salmon. She had already arrived and was preparing for the Wednesday meeting when she learned it had been canceled, Norwegian authorities said.

    There was no mention of the cancellation in the Chinese press. The Chinese government has enforced a strict news blackout and imposed stricter security measures, including a roadblock to Jinzhou prison in Liaoning Province, where Mr. Liu is held.

    The 54-year-old former literature professor was sentenced in December to 11 years in prison for "inciting subversion of the state." His conviction was based partly on Charter 08, a pro-democracy manifesto he co-authored. The document garnered 10,000 signatures before the government blocked its circulation on the Internet.

    His wife, Liu Xia, was allowed to visit her husband for an hour on Sunday at the prison. In Beijing, she is being kept under house arrest, according to a statement by the group Human Rights in China.

    She said her husband had told her, “This is for the lost souls of June 4th,” and then wept, the statement said. Hundreds died when Chinese troops and tanks moved to crush pro-democracy demonstrations in Tiananmen Square on June 4, 1989.

    Ms. Liu’s telephone and Internet communication has been cut off and state security officers are not allowing her to contact friends or the media, the statement said. Nor can she leave her house except in a police car, according to the human rights group.

    :angry_1::angry_1::angry_1::angry_1:
     
  14. dove

    dove Regular Member

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    What about Tibet, the most hostile neighbour of China ? Sooner or later they are going to overthrow you. You know that don't you ? Taiwan is also going to help them.
     
  15. dove

    dove Regular Member

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    You think these CCP drones don't know it ? How can they accept that while Sikkim joined India voluntarily, Tibetans are desperate to get out of Chinese clutches. What a loss of face!!!!!!

    Sikkim was only a protectorate of India, but was still an independent kingdom for many years. Then in 1975 a referendum was held in which 97.5% of the voting people (59% of the people entitled to vote) of Sikkim voted to join the Indian Union.
     
  16. tarunraju

    tarunraju Sanathan Pepe Moderator

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    Nepal, Bhutan, and Bangladesh are not sour neighbours. All three countries have laxed trade policies with India, the Indian Rupee is a payable currency in Nepal, Bangladesh returns criminals who flee to it promptly, Sri Lanka has heavy trade relations with India, Maldives has a zero-duty exchange with India, its head of state hangs out in Delhi very often., Myanmar is friendly to India despite being a Junta-led. That leaves PRC and Pakistan. In comparison, you have Japan, Taiwan, Vietnam, India, Tajikistan, as "sour neighbours".

    Now the question arises, how come we're in talking terms with a military dictatorship? Well, unlike Europe and the US, India NEVER lectured another country about democracy or how to run their country. Pakistan has been through military dictatorships in and out, there's communist China next door, a constitutional monarchy with Bhutan, and so on, throughout USSR's existence, we've got along with them.

    And get a clue, Sikkim ceded to India democratically, not annexed. It's not a neighbour. What China did to Tibet was annexation, for neutrality, what India did to Kashmir was accession (voluntarily, signed by its head of state and ratified by Britain), what Pakistan tried to do to Kashmir was annexation.
     
    Last edited: Oct 12, 2010
  17. amoy

    amoy Senior Member Senior Member

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    IT sounds like China 30years ago I guess (and China was worse then)... But back to its starting point, I mean, USSR began all that 'communist experiment' when there was no modern industrialization, no democracy (Tzar dictatorship), but a 'sick man' of Europe in 1910's. Then re-measure its 'progress' it had achieved in just a few decades . After WWII (1945) it was the world no.2 in many ways and even a lighthouse at the time exporting its ideology to the 3rd world (many were colonies) who saw its model as a viable alternative and counter-balance, and offering 'free' aid and education to the 3rd world people.

    I'm not trying to beautify USSR. But in a dimentional and dynamic measurement with the timeline in mind, USSR was a positive being in the history IMO, needless to mention that bi-polar equilibrium and valueable experience for late-comers like China.
     
    Last edited: Oct 12, 2010
  18. Ray

    Ray The Chairman Defence Professionals Moderator

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    I am sure that this will be more irritating to the CCP since it takes Taiwan to be a part of China and to imagine them not toeing the CCCP line!

    A few more missiles would be added to the ones already targeting the Republic of China.
     
  19. Ray

    Ray The Chairman Defence Professionals Moderator

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    Gorbachev won the Peace Prize because he was bold to herald the end of the Cold War.

    It was not because of heralding in liberalisation.

    If it were so, then Deng too should have got the Nobel!

    One understands China's peeve. This prize does show China in poor light when viewed with the international baselines for human rights.

    As I have said earlier, the Chinese baselines for human rights are not similar since the ideas promoted by Liu Xiaobo though laudable internationally, it is viewed by China to be subversive.
     
    Last edited: Oct 12, 2010
  20. Ray

    Ray The Chairman Defence Professionals Moderator

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    China's bid to divide Asean over territorial disputes

    Chinese Foreign Minister Yang Jiechi acknowledged that "there are territorial and maritime rights disputes" between China and some of its neighbours but, he said, "those disputes should not be viewed as ones between China and Asean as a whole just because the countries involved are Asean members".

    That statement shows that China wants to divide Asean into countries which have territorial disputes with China over tiny islands in the South China Sea -- the Philippines, Vietnam, Brunei and Malaysia -- and the six other members -- Indonesia, Thailand, Laos, Cambodia, Myanmar and Singapore.

    China's Disputes with Neighbours
     

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