Prison for pregnant troops in Iraq!!!

Discussion in 'International Politics' started by bhramos, Dec 20, 2009.

  1. bhramos

    bhramos Elite Member Elite Member

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    Prison for pregnant troops in Iraq

    "Think before you do something", soldiers told.




    Becoming pregnant has become a punishable offence for female American soldiers in Iraq and for those who make them pregnant as well.
    General Anthony Cucolo, who commands US forces in northern Iraq, says offenders including married couples could attract punishments such as a court martial, or time in prison.
    "I have female soldiers in absolutely critical specialties and becoming pregnant takes them out of the fight," he said.
    "And so that's my message to the females - think before you do something, because I need you.
    "And for the males, if you take one of my soldiers out of the fight, well, there are consequences for that too.
    "It's black and white for me. I've got a mission to do. I am given a finite number of soldiers with which to do it and I need every one of them.
    "So I'm going to take every measure I can to keep them all strong, fit and with me for the 12 months that we're in the combat zone."
    BBC

    Prison for pregnant troops in Iraq - ABC News (Australian Broadcasting Corporation)
     
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  3. bengalraider

    bengalraider DFI Technocrat Stars and Ambassadors

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    Call me a bad guy(you with the frowns) but i believe the general has made the right decision,. If anyone is planning to get pregnant while on duty(the entire time spent in Iraq is treated as on duty)you should not have signed up in the first place.The united states government is spending a lot of money in shifting men and material to Iraq , to enlist and fly to Iraq only to get pregnant there is simply irresponsible and i would rate it as dereliction of duty, the general has the right to demand that his troops be ready to fulfill their responsibilities.
     
  4. shiv

    shiv Regular Member

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    yes thats a right dicision according to me but i am sure that the female activists back in the mainland will start shaving the generals pubic hair citing the freedom rights and undermining the feminism of those dames.
     
  5. bhramos

    bhramos Elite Member Elite Member

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    thats a good answer, but the female soldiers were also used for sex in Iraq or even being raped by their fellow soldiers.
    but why cant they use condoms or any preventive measures ?
    does the US does not provide their soldiers with such things?
    but Russia provides them.
     
  6. bhramos

    bhramos Elite Member Elite Member

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  7. bhramos

    bhramos Elite Member Elite Member

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    Military to drop order on soldiers' pregnancy in Iraq

    WASHINGTON — The controversial order punishing pregnancy among troops serving in northern Iraq will cease to exist on Jan. 1 when forces throughout the country begin operating under a new, unified set of regulations, an Army official has confirmed.

    With the transformation from Multi-National Force-Iraq to United States Forces-Iraq, Gen. Ray Odierno, the top U.S. commander in the country, is issuing a comprehensive General Order No. 1, according Lt. Col. Josslyn Aberle, spokeswoman for Odierno.

    It will draw from various orders previously in place but leave out the pregnancy punishments enacted in November by Maj. Gen. Anthony Cucolo.

    The decision to drop pregnancy from the list of prohibitions for U.S. soldiers comes less than a week after Stars and Stripes reported on Cucolo's order. The policy, which leaves open the possibility of court-martial and jail time for soldiers who become pregnant or impregnate others, drew sharp criticism from opponents, who said it infringed on basic rights of the individual.

    Among the critics were four Democratic senators who wrote a letter to Army Secretary John McHugh, asking him to rescind the pregnancy restriction.

    “This policy could encourage female soldiers to delay seeking critical medical care with potentially serious consequences for the mother and child,” said the letter signed by Barbara Boxer, Barbara Mikulski, Jeanne Shaheen and Kristen Gillibrand. ”We can think of no greater deterrent to women contemplating a military career than the image of a pregnant woman being severely punished for simply conceiving a child. That defies comprehension.”

    Cucolo this week said that seven soldiers – four women and three men – had faced administrative punishment for violating the pregnancy rule. He spent much of the last several days defending the policy, which he said was meant to stress the importance of his female soldiers and the problems created when a pregnant soldier is sent home from a war zone. He added that he had no intention of court-martialing violators.

    But by Thursday, it was clear that the pregnancy ban would not be included in the new set of general orders for troops that will take effect in 2010 when the new headquarters United States Forces-Iraq stands up.

    Aberle said the new policy will be aligned with both U.S. Central Command and Multi-National Corps Iraq’s policy, neither of which have a provision on pregnancy.

    And a statement made Thursday by Multi-National Force-Iraq indicated that the military wanted to prevent similar issues in the future.

    “All requests by subordinate units to impose further restrictions of activities addressed in General Order Number One will require approval of the USF-I Commander,” the statement said.

    Military to drop order on soldiers' pregnancy in Iraq | Stars and Stripes
     
  8. bhramos

    bhramos Elite Member Elite Member

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    Military to drop order on soldiers' pregnancy in Iraq

    WASHINGTON — The controversial order punishing pregnancy among troops serving in northern Iraq will cease to exist on Jan. 1 when forces throughout the country begin operating under a new, unified set of regulations, an Army official has confirmed.

    With the transformation from Multi-National Force-Iraq to United States Forces-Iraq, Gen. Ray Odierno, the top U.S. commander in the country, is issuing a comprehensive General Order No. 1, according Lt. Col. Josslyn Aberle, spokeswoman for Odierno.

    It will draw from various orders previously in place but leave out the pregnancy punishments enacted in November by Maj. Gen. Anthony Cucolo.

    The decision to drop pregnancy from the list of prohibitions for U.S. soldiers comes less than a week after Stars and Stripes reported on Cucolo's order. The policy, which leaves open the possibility of court-martial and jail time for soldiers who become pregnant or impregnate others, drew sharp criticism from opponents, who said it infringed on basic rights of the individual.

    Among the critics were four Democratic senators who wrote a letter to Army Secretary John McHugh, asking him to rescind the pregnancy restriction.

    “This policy could encourage female soldiers to delay seeking critical medical care with potentially serious consequences for the mother and child,” said the letter signed by Barbara Boxer, Barbara Mikulski, Jeanne Shaheen and Kristen Gillibrand. ”We can think of no greater deterrent to women contemplating a military career than the image of a pregnant woman being severely punished for simply conceiving a child. That defies comprehension.”

    Cucolo this week said that seven soldiers – four women and three men – had faced administrative punishment for violating the pregnancy rule. He spent much of the last several days defending the policy, which he said was meant to stress the importance of his female soldiers and the problems created when a pregnant soldier is sent home from a war zone. He added that he had no intention of court-martialing violators.

    But by Thursday, it was clear that the pregnancy ban would not be included in the new set of general orders for troops that will take effect in 2010 when the new headquarters United States Forces-Iraq stands up.

    Aberle said the new policy will be aligned with both U.S. Central Command and Multi-National Corps Iraq’s policy, neither of which have a provision on pregnancy.

    And a statement made Thursday by Multi-National Force-Iraq indicated that the military wanted to prevent similar issues in the future.

    “All requests by subordinate units to impose further restrictions of activities addressed in General Order Number One will require approval of the USF-I Commander,” the statement said.

    Military to drop order on soldiers' pregnancy in Iraq | Stars and Stripes
     

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