American strategic chess game in middle-east and south asia

Discussion in 'Defence & Strategic Issues' started by ajtr, Mar 24, 2010.

  1. ajtr

    ajtr Veteran Member Veteran Member

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    only posting the paragraphs concerning india

    American Strategy games

     
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  3. ajtr

    ajtr Veteran Member Veteran Member

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    For US, world is a chessboard

     
  4. nandu

    nandu Senior Member Senior Member

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    Hillary makes it loud & clear: US proud to stand with their patrons

    NEW DELHI: The US has initiated a high-level dialogue with Pakistan with the aim of broadening ties and establishing a long-term strategic relationship. As a result, Washington which earlier refused to even talk about the possibility of a civilian nuclear cooperation with Pakistan has signalled its willingness to consider the Pakistani request for an agreement and expressed its intention of supplying Pakistan with military hardware.

    Pakistan’s increased importance was signaled by US Secretary of State Hillary Clinton who praised the Pakistani Army for fighting terror after launching the strategic dialogue in Washington. Ms Clinton said at a press conference with Pakistani foreign minister Shah Mehmood Qureshi that Pakistan is no longer “unaided and that the US is proud to stand with it.”

    She pledged full support for Pakistan saying “its struggles are our struggles.” Maintaining that the US and Pakistan “have had our misunderstandings and disagreements in the past” she said “there are sure to be more disagreements in the future, as there are between any friends or, frankly, any family members...But this is a new day. For the past year, the Obama administration has shown in our words and deeds a different approach and attitude toward Pakistan.”

    The US sees Pakistan as the main ally in the fight against the Taliban and al-Qaeda. A Washington Post report said the Obama administration ``hopes that the high-level talks will consolidate the new partnership the president promised last fall in exchange for Pakistan’s cooperation in shutting down Taliban and al-Qaeda havens.’’

    In this context India’s real concerns on Pakistan sponsored terrorism are not expected to feature very high in the US calculation. Even though Washington maintained that the upgradation of ties with Pakistan would not affect Indo-US ties. Washington’s outreach to Pakistan is being seen as an attempt to make Islamabad feel that it is at par with New Delhi. Even Indian concerns about increasing military aid to Pakistan without proper checks and balances have fallen on deaf ears.

    The only area that the US is concerned about is a possible escalation of tension between India and Pakistan and that too in the context of the fallout on Afghanistan. Washington is unlikely to press Islamabad for action against the Lashkar-e-Taiba and other terror groups targeting India as it seeks to remove the trust deficit with Pakistan. “This is a dialogue designed to produce a better long-term strategic relationship between our two countries. This is not simply about asking and receiving items,” the Pentagon press secretary was quoted as saying.

    Through this week, the Pakistani leadership has been holding intensive discussions with the Obama administration. Pakistan’s Army chief Gen Ashfaq Kayani held talks with defence secretary Robert Gates and chairman of the joint chief of staff Admiral Mike Mullen. Pakistan has been lobbying US for ``shoot-and-kill’’ drones, a technology that is closely guarded by the US. Gen Kayani also met separately with US central command General David Petraeus. According to a statement, the two “discussed ways to advance co-operation and collaboration in countering extremist violence in Afghanistan, as well as US support for Pakistan’s struggle against violent extremists at home.’’

    http://economictimes.indiatimes.com
     

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