Video: lynching of two brothers in Sialkot

Discussion in 'General Multimedia' started by ajtr, Aug 21, 2010.

  1. ajtr

    ajtr Veteran Member Veteran Member

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    SC orders probe into Sialkot lynching of two brothers


    ISLAMABAD: Horrified by a brutal incident of vigilante justice, the Supreme Court on Friday came down hard on law-enforcement personnel and their superior officers who stood by and watched as two young brothers were tortured and then hanged by a mob in Sialkot.

    It ordered Anti-Corruption Director General Justice (retd) Kazim Malik to investigate the matter. No-one would dare to take law into his own hands if police had the courage and command to eradicate such brutal and inhuman practices from the society, Chief Justice Iftikhar Mohammad Chaudhry observed while heading a bench which had taken a suo motu action on the matter.

    On Aug 15, dozens of people publicly beat to death two young brothers, Hafiz Mughees, 15, and Hafiz Muneeb, 19, in the presence of Sialkot District Police Officer Waqar Chauhan and eight other police officers who watched the brutal act as silent spectators. The bodies were later hanged upside down on the chowk.

    Litigants and counsel were shocked and the atmosphere became tense when the gruesome video footage aired by a private TV channel was shown in the courtroom. And it was too much to bear for the grief-stricken grandfather and father of the deceased who started wailing after watching it.

    When DPO Chauhan informed the court that the SHO concerned had been arrested, but culprits were yet to be detained, the chief justice said he (Mr Chauhan) deserved to be suspended and sent to jail straightaway. The negligence shown by police could not be ignored, the CJ observed.

    “What message have you given to the world about Pakistan,” he asked the DPO and said: “Nowhere in a civilised society such an incident takes place in the presence of police.”

    He said the country was already facing disasters and crisis with people dying of hunger, but police were indulging in extra-judicial killings.

    The chief justice deplored the apathy of top police officers and senior federal government officials who were aware of the incident.

    “Not only it was the duty of police to stop those who were beating the two brothers, but the people in the mob should also have shown moral courage by preventing the beating,” the chief justice said.

    Secretary establishment Ismail Qureshi, who had been urgently summoned, informed the court that there was no dearth of good and honest officers who could probe the matter independently.

    The court ordered him to ask the Punjab government to take strict disciplinary action against Superintendent Police (investigations) Mohammad Afzal and DPO Chauhan.

    The Inspector General of Punjab was directed to take strict action against the police officers who were present at the crime scene but did nothing to stop it. The case will be taken up again on Sept 1.

    Our Sialkot Correspondent adds: District Police Officer Sialkot Waqar Ahmad Chauhan and SP investigation were made officer on special duty on Friday by the Inspector-General of Police, Punjab.

    The police, meanwhile, registered a case against 14 policemen, including the suspended SHO, in the wake of the murder of two brothers on Aug 15.

    Inspector Rana Mohammad Ilyas was SHO Sadar when the mob tortured the two brothers to death suspecting them to be robbers.
     
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  3. ajtr

    ajtr Veteran Member Veteran Member

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  4. ajtr

    ajtr Veteran Member Veteran Member

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    Vigilante mob kills two


    SIALKOT: An infuriated mob beat two alleged criminals to death as they were trying to escape the scene of a crime.
    The two men allegedly killed two and injured four during a robbery early Sunday morning on main Daska Road near Doburji Malhiyaan.
    Police officials said that villagers chased the robbers as they tried to flee the scene of the crime.
    District police officer (DPO) Waqar Ahmad Chohan said that the mob cornered the robbers outside the street and began pelting them with stones. “A large crowd started throwing stones and bricks at the men as they tried to escape. Both men were killed in the attack,” he said.
    Chohan said that the crowd attacked the men with stones, bricks, iron rods, hockey sticks and wooden sticks.
    Later in the day, locals placed the dead bodies of the accused dacoits on the main Sialkot-Daska Road and staged an anti-police demonstration. “The Sialkot Saddar police have failed to protect the lives of the people and they haven’t arrested the scores of criminals in the area,” said resident Liaqat, adding that the people had decided to take the law into their own hands.
    Locals demanded immediate legal action against Sialkot police officials for failing to control the rising crime rate in the region.
    The incident took place in Hajipura police precincts during sehri hours, when four masked men were looting a family of six on Butter Road. When the family, including Zeeshan Qadir, his wife and four children tried to resist the robbers, they opened fire on the family.
    The robbers killed 19-year-old Bilal on the spot and Zeeshan died in the hospital two hours later.
    According to Rescue 1122 officials, several people heard the gun shots in the street. “We all gathered to ask where the sounds were coming from when we saw the men trying to escape,” said Shahnawaz, a neighbor, adding that the crowd managed to stop two of the men.
    “We found out they had killed our friends and we knew that the police would let them off so we killed them,” he said. The mob also hanged the bodies of the robbers as people came and pelted rocks at them in a public square.
    “The protestors wanted to burn the dead bodies but we stopped them and dispersed the crowd,” said Sialkot district coordination officer (DCO) Mujahid Sher Dil. DPO Waqar Ahmad Chohan, district emergency officer Sialkot Syed Kamal Abid and senior district administration officials reached the spot and negotiated with the outraged people to recover the bodies of the alleged robbers.
    DPO Chohan assured the crowd that stern legal action would be taken against police officials neglecting their duties. Four hours after being assured by police officials and the DCO, the crowd handed over the bodies to the police
    The bodies of the alleged dacoits and their victims were sent to Allama Iqbal Memorial DHQ Hospital Sialkot for autopsy. The hospital administration has said that the four people seriously injured by the dacoits are presently in critical condition.
    Published in The Express Tribune, August 16th, 2010.
     
  5. Known_Unknown

    Known_Unknown Devil's Advocate Stars and Ambassadors

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    These are routine incidents that happen both in India and Pakistan. Nothing extraordinary.
     
  6. Kunal Biswas

    Kunal Biswas Member of the Year 2011 Moderator

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    15 & 19 years, hanged??
     
  7. Rebelkid

    Rebelkid Regular Member

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    they where beaten to death, then hanged and then their bodies beaten again .... I just get insane when i keep hearing such pathetic news... Its a common problem in both India and pakistan..
     
  8. ajtr

    ajtr Veteran Member Veteran Member

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    Mourning the Sialkot killings

    BY JAWAD MUZAFFAR ON 08 23RD, 2010 | COMMENTS (255)

    Let us all mourn for the family of the two brothers who were killed by an angry mob in the presence of police officials in Sialkot last week.

    My heart compelled me to write this due to the depression and anxiety that has been looming in my mind after hearing about the brutal killings.

    Pakistan has been going through a terrible crisis situation. No one knows where this country is going, but it certainly does not feel like we are heading in the right direction. Is this is the beginning of some terrible end?

    Everyone has a heart. I wonder how can someone’s heart and mind go so numb that not even a single person out of the mob came in front to stop the brutal act. Many people were present on the sad site for hours and while making videos, they forgot their moral, social and religious duties. I can’t stop wondering how no one felt pity on the young boys who were even being beaten up after they had lost their lives. This is evidence of sheer inhumanity, rather the height of it.

    If the victims had been blamed for murdering any of the culprits’ family members such fury may be just a little bit understandable, that yes, in retaliation a person could become such animal. But what did they do?

    This incident has also proved that there seems to exist no rule of law left in this country. Those policemen, who were present at the time of this brutal killing, should be punished in the harshest way possible so that no police official in future can even think of overlooking his duties of trust, faith and security. How convenient it was for the SHO to escape from police custody is just another example of our lack of rule.

    Pakistan’s image is already tarnished, and this incident only made it worse. Media has once again acted responsibly and highlighting this incident is perhaps what compelled the chief justice to take sou moto notice. The culprits can easily be recognized by looking at the footage. There is no reason for them not be caught and brought to justice.

    I was listening to the interview of the victims’ grandfather. While crying he expressed his anguish by saying that even the butchers do not sacrifice animals in the manner these men had killed his grandsons. The father of the victims said that he came to know about his great loss just before time for Iftar; the beasts had already killed his sons during the day time.

    Thinking of the Sialkot sons’ family has made me restless. This is the height of brutality.

    Like every Pakistani with a heart and mind, I too wish and pray that the culprits responsible for the deaths of the young boys are caught and punished with no political or social power intervening in their case.
     
  9. ajtr

    ajtr Veteran Member Veteran Member

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    Murder will out

    BY SHYEMA ON 08 23RD, 2010 | COMMENTS (65)

    A judicial executioner, someone whose job description in simple terms requires him to kill, covers his face when he carries out a death sentence. The reasons for this vary from law to law, but one thing is for certain, no executioner would probably want his face displayed each time he drops the rope. I am not sure however, if this sentiment applies to the angry Pakistani mobs who have boldly taken to the streets to burn, beat and kill anyone who may have allegedly done something wrong. Hiding faces or identities is not even necessary here where even the men in uniform have been clearly caught on camera amidst these barbaric mobs.

    Without sounding clichéd, I feel the desperate need to reiterate that there is something terribly wrong with our society as a whole. What happened last Sunday in Sialkot was not an isolated event. We have watched police and public alike beat people up in the name of crime, blasphemy, feuds and personal vengeances. Starved for entertainment, we record videos of people being beaten to death. Insensitive of emotions, we gaze at the camera and then turn our eyes back to the spectacle at hand – the murders in the process. Ignorant of the law, we feel invincible as we pass on the sticks and stones – accessory to murder. Oblivious of our crime, we dust our hands and go back home – pass on the story while we walk around the area. Not bogged down by the weight of what we witnessed, we fall asleep – peacefully.

    Educated or not, exposed or not, well-aware or not – there can’t be anyone in Pakistan today who feels that public lynching and communal murders can be justified in any way – granted we are a selfish nation, but the floods and terrorism have already taken away thousands of our fellow citizens, do we really want to allow barbarians to take down a couple more?

    Those boys deserved a judicial case and then appropriate punishment if any of the initial claims against them committing robbery were true. The bandits burnt to death in Karachi’s Lyari area deserved time in court and then in jail too. The Hindu boy beaten to death in a Korangi factory deserved the same and so did the two Christian brothers publicly tortured to death in Sialkot. What superiority complex do we as a society have that we feel it is okay for us to pass out and then carry out death sentences ourselves? How are we wired any differently than other nations where we watch such things happen and still have the will to go on strong the next day?

    I do not believe in generalisation and I do not believe that each member of the police force is a cold-blooded, ethic-lacking, duty-abandoning façade of an official. However, that being said, I still can’t salute the force which accommodates men who watch murders take place in broad daylight without taking any action. Unfortunately, the only time I hear myself or someone else praising and lauding the police is when some officials sacrifice their lives while protecting the public. Should we only respect officials after they’ve given their lives – nothing short of that matters? Once again – something very wrong with our wiring.

    The Chief Justice has taken notice and the leaders have promised action. Do you believe them? I don’t. But does that mean I will pick up my weapon of choice and march on to launch a massacre – most definitely not. If we had faith in the police and the judiciary, perhaps things would not be as bleak as they are today. Perhaps channelling our collective thoughts into fixing these institutions of our society might be a better idea than sitting home with a heavy heart and empty mind.

    Yes such incidents embarrass us as a nation and appal us and cause people like you to make posters and protest, while people like me type an angry note and people like Rehman Malik make false promises. I know my services to this society do not end after I am done writing this and your part does not end after you are done reading this either – so what do we do next?

    Shyema Sajjad is the Deputy Editor at Dawn.com
     
  10. Vikramaditya

    Vikramaditya Regular Member

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    criminal must be punished
     
  11. Zaki

    Zaki Regular Member

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    Must watch video
     
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  12. Rebelkid

    Rebelkid Regular Member

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    Can't watch it...rather painfull...
     
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  13. Daredevil

    Daredevil On Vacation! Administrator

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    Such barbarity should be punished no matter where it takes place. Otherwise, we are not humans.
     
  14. Singh

    Singh Phat Cat Administrator

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    Personally I too found this whole incident horrid, and what horrifies me further was that this happened in a rather well developed urban area of Pakistan.

    However,one must understand that if the State wasn't dysfunctional this wouldn't have happened. Basically if the state cannot guarantee security, law and order etc people refuse to trust the state or obey state's authority and consequently carry out their own notional justice. The involvement of police and politicians suggests that the judicial system is faulty and therefore they condone subversion of constitution and allow notional justice in order to maintain a facade of their authority over the citizens.
     
  15. The Messiah

    The Messiah Bow Before Me! Elite Member

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    when people sense guilty party will get away because of corrupt system then public takes law into there own hands.

    this sense of trust is eroding in India as well....due to corrupt system. Often criminals get away scot free here also....so when public gets holds of perople stealing they take out full frustration on them which is always out of proportion to the crime.
     
  16. ajtr

    ajtr Veteran Member Veteran Member

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    Pakistanis Ask What a Lynching Means




    The family of two teenage brothers who were beaten to death last month in Pakistan, after they were mistaken for criminals by an enraged mob, asked that a court-ordered post-mortem be delayed until a new medical expert can be appointed to the case, the Pakistani newspaper Dawn reported.

    The chief justice of Pakistan’s Supreme Court, Iftikhar Muhammad Chaudhry, had asked for the bodies of the two boys, Muneeb Butt and his brother Hafiz Mughees, to be exhumed because, a report said, local officials had tampered with medical evidence about the killings, which took place in front of several police officers in the city of Sialkot.

    While local authorities were initially slow to act, 28 suspects are now in custody, including 10 police officers, Dawn reported on Wednesday.

    The brutal killings, which were caught on video, have shocked Pakistanis and led to a debate about what this example of mob rule in Punjab Province says about the state of civil society in the country.

    The murders took place on Aug. 15, when the boys, who were carrying cricket equipment in a bag, were mistaken for armed robbers and beaten to death with sticks, rods and bricks. They were then strung up next to an office of Punjab Province’s emergency rescue service.

    After video of the incident was shown of television, Danish Farid Khan wrote in a letter to the editors of Dawn, “as much as making videos or taking snaps was good to bring this incident to light, one must question the intent of the people capturing the events unfolding. As a nation it would be safe to say that we are all spectators that would stare and ogle … in amazement or agony, and yet do nothing about it.”

    Days later, Fasi Zaka, an opinion columnist for The Express Tribune, an English-language newspaper in Karachi, wrote:

    ‘Pakistan, you are a failed state. Not because of Zardari. Not because of America. But because you are a failed people, all of us undeserving of sympathy. We are diseased, rotten to every brain stem, world please make an impenetrable fence around us, keep us all in so we don’t spread it to other people, other countries.’

    These were words I posted on a social-networking Web site. I have an unusually negative mindset these days. It happened after I saw the video of the two teenage brothers brutally clubbed to death by a crowd frenzied with blood thirst in Sialkot. The police watched gleefully. The video has blurs at certain parts, but even this sensible sensitivity does not prevent one from seeing mists of blood flaying from the heads of these teens as they are hit relentlessly, and remorselessly, again and again.

    The murderous crowd was truly representative of the richness of Pakistan. Some wear jeans, others shalwar kameez, some were bearded, others clean shaven. The Pakistanis had gotten together to have some fun.

    Do not be shocked. This wasn’t isolated, it’s just that the crowd wanted to make sure their orgasmic moment could be captured for later viewing, at one’s pleasure. We blame our ill-educated brethren for the barbarity we witness, but that’s a self-serving lie.
    The next day, George Fulton, an Englishman who has become a television personality in his adopted Pakistan, chimed in, arguing in the same publication that Pakistanis denouncing the crime were being hypocritical:

    Oh, the shock! Oh, the disgust! Oh, the outrage over the barbaric killings in Sialkot! The media, the blogosphere, Facebookers have been going into hyperactive overdrive to out condemn one another over the senseless killings of the two teenage boys. Some have frothed with self-righteous anger, some have put the blame on poverty and illiteracy (a self-serving defense that ignores the violent solutions advocated in many a swanky drawing room discussion), some on the breakdown of the social contract between the state and the individual. But all seem shocked by the barbarity on display. But why are we surprised? Why the denial? Hasn’t it always been thus?

    We are, and have always been, a barbaric, degenerate nation reveling in blood lust. Our nation was forged during a bloody partition — in which up to one million people were massacred. One just has to read eyewitness accounts of the riots, the train butchery, the brutal rapes and slaughter of that period to get a feel of the heady, almost orgasmic, delight that the perpetrators of these crimes reveled in as the nation was born.

    The lynching itself is nothing new. Read any report by the Human Rights Commission of Pakistan and you will see that this is a fairly regular occurrence. Christians, Hindus, homosexuals, suspected pedophiles and robbers have been killed at the hands of mob justice.
    In response, Mahreen Aziz Khan, a lawyer, decried what she called “The Liberal Lynch Mob,” writing in The Express Tribune:

    This past week has seen columns, in these very pages, promoting a new brand of hatred –- self-hatred –- inciting loathing amongst Pakistanis for themselves and their culture. Using the horrific Sialkot killings, these ‘Western, liberal’ columnists have labeled all Pakistanis as ‘degenerates’ and ‘barbaric,’ hurling abusive and shameful generalizations to justify a verbal lynching of Pakistan, its culture and people. …

    These columnists would not dare to write in such sadistic terms about Western cultures. No, they only prey on weak — pure lynch mob mentality — developing nations like Pakistan, battered by natural catastrophe, war and poverty. The reality is that Pakistanis are inherently no better and no worse than any other people. The best amongst us lay down our lives to rescue those in need, open our homes and hearts to complete strangers, protest peacefully for justice. The worst amongst us are as brutal as the mobs which massacred women and children in the streets of Gujarat, with the Indian police looking on, harbor as much bigotry as the preachers of hate, whether they be Christian, Hindu, or Muslim.

    When the rule of law is eroded, men, irrespective of race, turn into an unruly mob… police officers turn into executioners and ordinary people into accomplices. Pakistanis will and must maintain pressure to obtain justice in Sialkot. They will do so not out of self-loathing or in response to the verbal lynching liberals, but because they believe it is the right thing to do.
    Also writing in the Express Tribune, Salman Masood — who contributes to The New York Times — agreed that the incident revealed the weakness of civil society in Pakistan, but called the blanket denunciations of the whole of Pakistani society unhelpful. He wrote:

    Year after year, Pakistan has witnessed a gradual erosion of the state’s authority, deterioration and decay of institutions and fraying of the social and moral fiber of society. We live in a Pakistan where life has become cheaper and expendable, where law is selective and easily manipulated and where bitter realities eclipse any idealistic notions. Often, duplicitous and hypocritical behavior marks day-to-day actions and interactions in society. Tolerance is on the wane and extremism is thriving.

    But the sheer brutality of the mob lynching in Sialkot has unnerved the national conscience and there has been a massive outpouring of grief, outrage and condemnation. And, therefore, I would take an exception to Fasi Zaka’s article … where in utter bad taste he belittled Pakistanis as ‘cockroaches.’ He is right, there is a sickening sense of moral superiority in Pakistanis, but collectively denigrating and insulting the whole nation is unfair. George Fulton’s ‘Don’t Be Surprised’ (published the next day) went further in his over-the-top characterization of Pakistanis as ‘brutal’ and ’savage.’
    Mr. Masood added:

    The outrage over the Sialkot incident demonstrates that those who view the incident as a grave injustice exist in society. Such voices need to be heard, strengthened and amplified. We also need clarity on why social order collapsed in this particular episode. The culprits should be brought to justice according to the law and in absolute terms. Media and civil society should keep the momentum strong enough to force the government to take tangible, meaningful action.

    Had the pieces by Mr. Zaka and Mr. Fulton been reflective of national soul-searching, one might have given them credit. But the acerbic and demeaning stereotyping and insinuations screaming out of such articles will do nothing to prevent any future batons that hit those young brothers in Sialkot.
     
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