USS New Orleans (LPD 18) Prepares for AH-1Z Cobra Attack Helicopter's 1st Deployment

Discussion in 'Americas' started by Someoneforyou, Aug 16, 2011.

  1. Someoneforyou

    Someoneforyou Regular Member

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    USS New Orleans Preps for Marine Attack Helicopter's First Deployment
    UNITED STATES - 15 AUGUST 2011

    USS NEW ORLEANS, At Sea | Amphibious transport dock ship USS New Orleans (LPD 18) hosted deck-landing qualifications (DLQs) for Marine Corps AH-1Z Cobra attack helicopters during a pre-deployment exercise, Aug. 11.

    Declared combat-ready by the U.S. Marine Corps in September 2010, the AH-1Z Cobra will undergo its first operational deployment as part of Amphibious Squadron (PHIBRON) 5 later this year.

    The helicopters are assigned to Marine Medium Helicopter Squadron (HMM) 268, part of the 11th Marine Expeditionary Unit's aviation combat element.

    "The whole point of this is to prepare the aircraft to provide support for our guys on the ground," said Gunnery Sgt. Joseph Kelley. "It's a get in, hit the enemy, get out, come back, resupply, and do it again type of aircraft. It's really an awesome piece of gear."

    Kelley also stressed the importance of the pilots being able to land the aircraft on multiple platforms.

    "LHDs won't be the only ones [capable of carrying the Cobra]," he said. "It might be an LPD, LHA it might even be a frigate, or anything with the landing capabilities, so they need to get their qualifications. It's also important for (handlers) to get familiar with working with this aircraft."

    Aviation Boatswain's Mate (Handling) 2nd Class Kelley Soucy said having the Cobra on board during deployment will present the crew with a variety of new challenges.

    "We've never loaded weapons onto aircraft before," she said. "It's a very new experience for us. A lot more precautions are going to be implemented into flight quarters when missions go down because these [aircraft] have a lot of weapons."

    Cmdr. Dennis Jacko, commanding officer of New Orleans, said having the Cobra on board provides crewmembers and Marines of the 11th MEU with a unique capability.

    "The Zulus offer an unmatched lethality to the Marines," he said. "They carry twice the ordnance, farther and faster than their predecessor, the AH-1W. Coupled with our embarked Marines, a detachment of ACE aircraft gives New Orleans a potent Marine Air Ground Task Force ready for any contingency."

    New Orleans has the ability to embark, operate and maintain up to ten aircraft, including the Cobra attack helicopter.

    PHIBRON 5, New Orleans and embarked Marines assigned to the 11th MEU, are conducting PHIBRON-MEU Integrated Training (PMINT) as part of the Makin Island Amphibious Ready Group.



    PACIFIC OCEAN (Aug. 12, 2011) Sailors and Marines aboard the San Antonio-class amphibious transport dock ship USS New Orleans (LPD 18) observe a Marine Corps AH-1Z Cobra attack helicopter lift off during deck landing qualifications. USS New Orleans and embarked Marines are conducting pre-deployment work-ups as part of the Makin Island Amphibious Ready Group.
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    PACIFIC OCEAN (Aug. 10, 2011) Aviation Boatswain's Mate (Handling) 3rd Class Lawrence Lowe guides a Marine Corps AH-1Z Viper attack helicopter off the flight deck of the San Antonio-class amphibious transport dock ship USS New Orleans (LPD 18) during flight quarters. The AH-1Z Viper was declared combat ready in September 2010 by the Marine Corps and will undergo its first upcoming operational deployment as part of Amphibious Squadron (PHIBRON) 5.
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    SAN DIEGO (JULY 1, 2011) The amphibious transport dock ship USS New Orleans (LPD 18) navigates San Diego Bay and under the Coronado Bridge on its way to Naval Base San Diego.
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    The U.S. Navy amphibious transport dock ship USS New Orleans (LPD 18). Length: 208 meters.
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    Last edited: Aug 19, 2011
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  3. Someoneforyou

    Someoneforyou Regular Member

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    U.S. Marine Corps AH-1Z Attack Helicopter:

    Weapons Capability:
    *AGM-114A, B, and C Hellfire and anti-tank missiles up to 16 total
    *AGM-114F Hellfire anti-ship missiles – up to 16 total
    *70mm Rockets, 19 or 7 shot pods –up to 76 total
    *AIM-9 Sidewinder*
    (*A superior supersonic air-to-air missile with infrared target detection for fire and forget capability.)
    *LUU-2A/B nighttime illumination flare
    *Mk 77 fire bombs
    *77 and 100 gallon external auxiliary fuel tanks
    *20 mm cannon
    (With a higher muzzle velocity and flatter trajectory for better accuracy, it is capable of handling M50-series rounds designed specifically for air-to-air combat)
    *MK 76 practice bombs
    *BDU-33D/B practice bombs
    *MK 106 practice bombs

    Survivability & Crashworthiness:
    Like no other attack helicopter in the world, the AH-1Z survives combat with an advanced countermeasure suite, which includes:

    *AVR-2A Laser Warning Receiver
    *APR-39A(v) 2 Radar Warning Receiver
    *ALE-47 “Smart” Countermeasures Dispenser and
    *AAR-47 Missile Warning Device.
    ...and the latest airframe technologies, such as:

    *Energy attenuating crashworthy seats
    *Energy-absorbing landing gear
    *Self sealing fuel tanks and fuel systems
    *Fuel vapor inerting systems
    *Mass retention designs to ensure major components stay where they should in the event of a crash, and many other advanced features.

    Modern Technology:
    The AH-1Z is a design for the 21st century. Produced to meet the stringent requirements of the U.S. Marine Corps today – its aircraft design brings together proven AH-1W airframe reliability, a new composite four bladed rotor system and powerful T700-GE-401engines. With virtually identical front and rear cockpits, fully integrated weapons, avionics and communications systems the AH-1Z flies with the most advanced aircraft survivability equipment in the world. The AH-1Z is truly state-of-the-art.

    Best Targeting System:
    Target identification is critical in the complex post-cold war and urban conflict environments. The AH-1Z Target Sight System (TSS) incorporates a third-generation FLIR and currently provides the longest range, lowest jitter and highest weapons' accuracy possible of any helicopter sight in the world. In addition, the completely passive and automatic system scans the battlefield without emitting trackable radar, positively identifying and tracking multiple targets at ranges beyond the maximum range of its weapons system.

    Helmet Mounted Sight and Display System:
    The "Top Owl" Helmet Mounted Sight and Display (HMS/D) system supports improved communication and reduced cockpit workload. Manufactured by THALES Avionics, the TopOwl HMS/D is the most technically advanced helmet available. Upgradeable "in-service" and as additional requirements develop, it combines both avionics function with the aircrew life support and protection into a single unit.

    Maintenance:
    Designed for lower maintenance, with the helicopter mechanic in mind, the AH-1Z is one of the most reliable aircraft made. Maintenance features of the AH-1Z include:

    *Fault detection sensors that facilitate “on-condition” maintenance
    *Interactive Electronic Technical Manuals
    *Better accessibility
    *Elimination of certain maintenance tasks
    *Less maintenance man hours per flight hour
    *Less spares storage requirement
    *Modern Cockpit

    Identical front and rear cockpits provide the true ability to fly and fight from either cockpit, so there's no need to have separate training programs for front or back seaters.

    The Hands on Collective and Stick (HOCAS) side-stick architecture, allows pilot function without removing hands from the collective flight controls. Color displays are large, multifunctional and combined with the moving-map technology. Helmet mounted displays provide all the information required to engage the enemy more quickly and accurately.

    H1 Program Commonality:
    Shared dynamics and nearly identical cockpits vastly reduces the logistical tail, procurement and training costs required to support a large fleet of mixed type aircraft. The AH-1Z and UH-1Y have 84% commonality with identical components.

    Just as the AH-1W is being rebuilt and redesigned into the AH-1Z, the US Marine Corps Huey helicopters are being rebuilt and redesigned as well. The traditional reliability of the Huey series now contributes to the outstanding performance, state-of-the-art dynamics and avionics of the H1 Program.


    Source: Bell Helicopter Textron Inc.


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    Target Sight System (TSS):

    TSS is the multi-sensor electro-optical/infrared (EO/IR) fire control system (AN/AAQ-30) for the U.S. Marine Corps AH-1Z Cobra attack helicopter. It is a large-aperture midwave forward-looking infrared (FLIR) sensor, color TV, laser designator/rangefinder (with eyesafe mode), and an on-gimbal inertial measurement unit are integrated into a highly stabilized turret. The turret mounts to the nose of the aircraft via the Lockheed Martin-developed aircraft interface structure. TSS provides the capability to identify and laser-designate targets at maximum weapon range, significantly enhancing platform survivability and lethality.

    Features:

    - 8.55-inch aperture, midwave staring FLIR with four fields-of-view for maximum image resolution and long-range performance

    - Multi-mode (point and scene), multi-target (3 image, 10 inertial), robust tracker with coast-through-obscuration capability

    - Gimbal stabilized to <15 microradians

    - On-gimbal inertial measurement unit for reduced image blur due to jitter and precise line pointing, target geo-location, and multi-target tracking

    - A multi-mode multi-target tracker

    - Advanced image processing for optimum gain and level, sharper imagery, and algorithms for enhanced recognition and identification range performance

    - High magnification, continuous zoom, color TV with field-of-view matched to the FLIR

    - State-of-the-art 640 x 512 InSb, low-noise-equivalent delta temperature, high-modulation transfer function detector with a high-reliability cooler

    - Versatile modular architecture for future growth


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    Source: Lockheed Martin


    Videos:




     
    Last edited by a moderator: May 10, 2015
  4. utubekhiladi

    utubekhiladi The Preacher Elite Member

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    whats the name of that red colored missile?
     
  5. Someoneforyou

    Someoneforyou Regular Member

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    PACIFIC OCEAN (Aug. 15, 2011) An amphibious assault vehicle departs the well deck of the San Antonio-class amphibious transport dock ship USS New Orleans (LPD 18). USS New Orleans and embarked Marines from the 11th Marine Expeditionary Unit are conducting pre-deployment work-ups as part of the Makin Island Amphibious Ready Group.
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    PACIFIC OCEAN (Aug. 15, 2011) Amphibious assault vehicles depart the well deck of the San Antonio-class amphibious transport dock ship USS New Orleans (LPD 18). USS New Orleans and embarked Marines from the 11th Marine Expeditionary Unit are conducting pre-deployment work-ups as part of the Makin Island Amphibious Ready Group.
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    PACIFIC OCEAN (Aug. 15, 2011) Amphibious assault vehicles prepare to depart the well deck of the San Antonio-class amphibious transport dock ship USS New Orleans (LPD 18). USS New Orleans, along with Marines embarked from the 11th Marine Expeditionary Unit are conducting pre-deployment work-ups as part of the Makin Island Amphibious Ready Group.
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    PACIFIC OCEAN (Aug. 15, 2011) A Sailor watches amphibious assault vehicles depart the well deck of the San Antonio-class amphibious transport dock ship USS New Orleans (LPD 18). USS New Orleans and embarked Marines from the 11th Marine Expeditionary Unit are conducting pre-deployment work-ups as part of the Makin Island Amphibious Ready Group.
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    PACIFIC OCEAN (Aug. 14, 2011) Sailors and Marines aboard the San Antonio-class amphibious transport dock ship USS New Orleans (LPD 18) observe Sailors operating rigid-hull inflatable boats with Marines from the 11th Marine Expeditionary Unit (11th MEU) Maritime Raid Force during a practice raid. New Orleans and embarked Marines from the 11th MEU are conducting pre-deployment work-ups as part of the Makin Island Amphibious Ready Group.
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    PACIFIC OCEAN (Aug. 12, 2011) Sailors assigned to the San Antonio-class amphibious transport dock ship USS New Orleans (LPD 18) operate a rigid-hull inflatable boat during a practice mission with the 11th Marine Expeditionary Unit (11th MEU) Maritime Raid Force. USS New Orleans and embarked Marines are conducting pre-deployment work-ups as part of the Makin Island Amphibious Ready Group.
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    PACIFIC OCEAN (Aug. 10, 2011) Amphibious assault vehicles enter the well deck of the San Antonio-class amphibious transport dock ship USS New Orleans (LPD 18). USS New Orleans and embarked Marines assigned to the 11th Marine Expeditionary Unit are conducting pre-deployment work-ups as part of the Makin Island Amphibious Ready Group.
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    PACIFIC OCEAN (Aug. 10, 2011) Aviation Boatswain's Mate (Handling) 2nd Class Kelley Soucy guides a U.S. Marine Corps AH-1Z Viper attack helicopter off the flight deck of the San-Antonio class amphibious transport dock ship USS New Orleans (LPD 18). The AH-1Z Viper was declared combat ready in September 2010 by the Marine Corps and will undergo its first upcoming operational deployment as part of Amphibious Squadron (PHIBRON) 5.
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    Last edited: Aug 18, 2011

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