US making strategic bet on India

Discussion in 'Foreign Relations' started by Galaxy, Oct 12, 2011.

  1. Galaxy

    Galaxy Elite Member Elite Member

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    US making strategic bet on India

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    WASHINGTON, Oct 11: The future of world politics will be decided in the Asia-Pacific region, not Afghanistan or Iraq, and the United States will be right at the centre of the action, says US Secretary of State Hillary Clinton in an article she has written for the November issue of the prestigious Foreign Policy magazine.

    In the 5,500-word article, Secretary Clinton reviews the challenges that the United States is likely to face in the near future and concludes that real changes are taking place in the Asia-Pacific region, not in the Pak-Afghan region. She also places India in the Asia-Pacific region, pointing out that the US “is making a strategic bet on India`s future”.

    “As the war in Iraq winds down and America begins to withdraw its forces from Afghanistan, the United States stands at a pivot point,” she writes.

    “Over the last 10 years, we have allocated immense resources to those two theatres. In the next 10 years, we need to be smart and systematic about where we invest time and energy.”

    One of the most important tasks of American statecraft over the next decade, she argues, will be to “lock in a substantially increased investment — diplomatic, economic, strategic, and otherwise — in the Asia-Pacific region”. She notes that the Asia-Pacific has become a key driver of global politics, includes many of the key engines of the global economy, and is home to several of key US allies and important emerging powers like China, India, and Indonesia.

    “The time has come for the United States to make similar investments” in this region as it did in Europe after the World War II, she argues. “Harnessing Asia`s growth and dynamism is central to American economic and strategic interests” as the region provides the United States with “unprecedented opportunities for investment, trade, and access to cutting-edge technology”.

    The rapid transformations taking place in the region, she writes, underscores “how much the future of the United States is intimately intertwined with the future of the Asia-Pacific”.

    She proposes a six-point strategy for staying engaged with the region, which includes maintaining political consensus and helping protect defence capabilities and communications infrastructure of US allies, particularly from non-state actors.

    Describing China as one of the most prominent emerging partners in the region, she notes that the US has stayed engaged with China on all key issues, including the war in Afghanistan and on the situation in Pakistan. “The fact is that a thriving America is good for China and a thriving China is good for America. We both have much more to gain from cooperation than from conflict,” she argues. The US, she says, is also committed to working with China to address critical regional and global security issues.

    Stressing the need for both the US and China to remain honest about their differences, Secretary Clinton writes: “At the end of the day, there is no handbook for the evolving US-China relationship. But the stakes are much too high for us to fail.”

    India, she argues, is another key emerging power with which the US will work closely as the relationship between India and America will be one of the defining partnerships of the 21st century, rooted in common values and interests.

    “There are still obstacles to overcome and questions to answer on both sides, but the United States is making a strategic bet on India`s future — that India`s greater role on the world stage will enhance peace and security,” she adds. Opening India`s markets to the world will pave the way to greater regional and global prosperity.

    Indian advances in science and technology, she notes, will improve lives and advance human knowledge everywhere, and India`s “vibrant, pluralistic democracy will produce measurable results and improvements” for its citizens and inspire others to follow a similar path of openness and tolerance.

    US making strategic bet on India | Newspaper | DAWN.COM
     
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  3. SLASH

    SLASH Senior Member Senior Member

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    Sweet talks as usual. But where is the money?
     
  4. Yusuf

    Yusuf GUARDIAN Administrator

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    I think any US future strategy can be decided only after it takes some concrete steps in AfPak and then pulls out from there. Till then, that region is a major distraction for it to go the next phase of its engagement in Asia. Though what it does is not a holding factor for the US, but it is for the Asian nations and India in particular as what the US does in AfPak and its policies there will determine policies of India and the future course India needs to take. So the sooner the better for the US to come out with a concrete policy and the main concern is off course Pakistan.

    One thing that the US has to realize is that they cannot be "partners" with china. They can do business with them, but then internationally the objectives of US and China dont meet. Just like how the US uses terms like "India, she argues, is another key emerging power with which the US will work closely as the relationship between India and America will be one of the defining partnerships of the 21st century, rooted in common values and interests.", the same cannot be used in the context of China. That is the difference. So the US has to make policies keeping this in mind. It should bury the idea of sharing the world with China in the Marianas trench.

    The US has to remember that it was the US and its western allies that made China. Without these countries, China would not have reached where it has today. Its the greed of the west for more margins that drove it to China to make their stuff cheap. But then handed over all kinds of technologies to China. But still, when push comes to shove, the same tech can be transferred to other countries in Asia including India and that will screw the Chinese real bad. China without export is a huge trouble for its population and its government. The whole chinese system and with it, its govt can collapse if their exports dwindle.

    The Chinese have been trying hard to diversify, but then in the end its the west that is its major customer. China is a case of trying to bite the hand that feeds it. Sooner or later, the hand is going to be withdrawn. For the US, the sooner it takes care of its old allies who really have been weary of the US policy as pushed by Obama in the initial days of sacrificing allies to make peace with China, the better it is for the US.

    The next three years are going to be crucial for all major players at it will define the partnerships for the next 50. The war in Afghanistan will draw to a close. The chinese game plan will also get clearer both from Indian as well as US point of view. I also expect a broad in principle alliance shape up, may be not on paper but in principle.

    Both India and China will have a lot of modern weapons in their inventory. China will be going ahead with its own 5th gen fighter plus it continues to expand its missile and submarine force. The battle lines will clearly be drawn by 2015.
     
  5. Bangalorean

    Bangalorean Stars and Ambassadors Stars and Ambassadors

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    Can someone tell me off-hand, are there still Indian organizations under the so-called "entity list"? I do remember that ISRO was removed from that infamous list some years back. Any other Indian companies/entities under the "entity list"?
     
  6. Yusuf

    Yusuf GUARDIAN Administrator

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    India itself was in the "entities list". Nuke deal took care of that. These days lists are bypassed with other 123's if you know what i mean.
     

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