Uprising in Libya

Discussion in 'West Asia & Africa' started by Blackwater, Feb 20, 2011.

  1. Blackwater

    Blackwater Veteran Member Veteran Member

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    [​IMG]


    Libyan security forces opened fire on mourners at a funeral for anti-government protesters in the eastern city of Benghazi again, a day after commandos and foreign mercenaries loyal to longtime leader Moammar Gaddafi attacked demonstrators with knives, assault rifles and other heavy weaponry.
    A doctor at one city hospital said he counted 200 dead in his morgue alone since unrest began six days ago.
    The crackdown in Libya is shaping up to be the most brutal repression of the anti-government protests that began with uprisings that toppled the regimes in Tunisia and Egypt. The protests then spread quickly around the region to Bahrain, Yemen, Libya, Algeria, Morocco and outside the Middle East to places including the East African nation of Djibouti and even China.
    The latest violence in the flashpoint city of Benghazi followed the same pattern as the crackdown on Saturday, when witnesses said forces loyal to Gaddafi attacked mourners at a funeral for anti-government protesters. The doctor at a Benghazi hospital said at least one person was killed by gunshots during the funeral march, and 14 were injured, including five in serious condition. He spoke on condition of anonymity for fear of reprisal.
    A man shot in the leg Sunday said marchers were carrying coffins to a cemetery when they passed a military compound in Libya's second-largest city. The man said security forces fired in the air and then opened up on the crowd.



    http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/wor...Gaddafis-forces-fire-on-protest-mourners.html
     
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  3. Blackwater

    Blackwater Veteran Member Veteran Member

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    Col Gadafi bhi gya. Insane dictatorsss. Well guess, in which country will he flee???
     
  4. Vikramaditya

    Vikramaditya Regular Member

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    Pakistan...............................
     
  5. Blackwater

    Blackwater Veteran Member Veteran Member

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    French reviera....with 72 russian virgins.If pakistan then 72 virgins talibans lolllllllllllllllll
     
  6. Blackwater

    Blackwater Veteran Member Veteran Member

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    Libyan Army Defects And 'Liberates' Benghazi


    Members of a Libyan army unit have told Benghazi residents they have defected and "liberated" the city from pro-Gaddafi forces.

    Speaking from Benghazi, a local man named Benali, told Sky News that members of the Libya's armed forces have defected and that anti-regime protesters are now in control of the city.

    Habib al-Obaidi, who heads the intensive care unit at the main Al-Jalae hospital, appeared to confirm the reports, saying the "Thunderbolt" squad arrived at the hospital with soldiers who had been injured in clashes with Gaddafi's men.

    "They are now saying that they have overpowered the Praetorian Guard and that they have joined the people's revolt," said Mr al-Obaidi.

    The doctor also confirmed the hospital had received the bodies of at least 50 people killed in clashes on Sunday afternoon.

    Most had died of bullet wounds and another 100 others were admitted with serious injuries.

    The news of further deaths comes as Libya's representative to the Arab League tendered his resignation in protest to "oppression against protesters".



    At least 200 people have been killed in four days of anti-government protests, the most serious against Colonel Gaddafi since he came to power 41 years ago.

    However, it has been a confusing picture in Libya as foreign journalists are banned from the country.

    Furthermore, telecommunications have been interrupted and the internet cut off.

    The FCO has advised against all but non-essential travel to Libya and is helping British nationals to leave the country.

    The United States has said it is "gravely concerned" by "credible reports" that hundreds of people had been injured or killed in a government crackdown, including reports that troops have fired machine guns at crowds.



    There was also widespread speculation within Libya that the regime had hired African mercenaries to suppress any anti-government action.

    One doctor in Benghazi was quoted as saying his hospital has counted at least 200 dead since the unrest began.

    Separately, a hospital worker in the city named Abdullah told Sky News: "(On Saturday) we had a heavy attack - gunshots by the army forces, especially at night.

    "People were protesting... the forces just attacked to make them leave."

    A video posted on the internet on Saturday night apparently shows protesters in Benghazi being fired on - but it is unclear whether those shooting are Libyan troops.



    Colonel Gaddafi came to power in Libya after a 1969 coup



    A resident of the city, Mary, also told Sky News there had been a fierce confrontation between protesters and the military on Saturday evening.

    "There was artillery fire back at young boys who were protesting infront of a big military compound where Colonel Gaddafi usually lives when he's here," she said.

    "The boys are trying to take this from the army but I don't think they'll have any chance because of the heavy artillery they're using against them."

    http://news.sky.com/skynews/Home/Wo..._Soldiers_As_They_Defect_From_Gaddafis_Forces
     
  7. Blackwater

    Blackwater Veteran Member Veteran Member

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    Gadafi ki puri bhaans gayi paani me.....

    [​IMG]

    MARASI SALA
     
  8. mattster

    mattster Respected Member Senior Member

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    Guys like Gaddafi, Hafez Assad, Saddam Hussein, Ben-Ali, Hosni Mubarak, the Shah of Iran, the Ayotollahs after the Shah, Kim Jong-il, all came into power claiming to be revolutionaries - but after 30 - 40 years in power, they and their protege sons/family members are now some of the biggest despotic most despised rulers.
     
  9. The Messiah

    The Messiah Bow Before Me! Elite Member

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    I bet he has dismantled his tent that he frequently uses and not to mention female guards and barricaded himself in some bunker with commandos :lol:
     
  10. The Messiah

    The Messiah Bow Before Me! Elite Member

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    Apparently he has fled the country and his sons are shooting at each other.

    what a mess!
     
  11. vijaytripoli

    vijaytripoli Regular Member

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    Continuous shooting going on in Tripoli with Heavy Weapons & all//
    Chau
     
    Last edited by a moderator: May 10, 2015
  12. Blackwater

    Blackwater Veteran Member Veteran Member

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    Libya protests: Gaddafi's son warns of civil war



    Libyan leader Muammar Gaddafi's son, Saif al-Islam, has warned that civil war could hit the country.

    His comments came in a lengthy TV address as anti-government protests spread to the capital Tripoli, and were brutally countered by security forces.

    Saif Gaddafi offered political reforms, and admitted that the police and army had made "mistakes", but said the death toll was lower than reported.

    Human Rights Watch says at least 233 people have died since last Thursday.

    It urged governments to tell Libya to stop the unlawful killing of protesters amid accounts of authorities using live ammunition against them.

    On Monday, reports from Tripoli suggested the streets were mainly quiet, with government forces still patrolling Green Square after crushing protests in what witnesses called a "massacre".

    A central government building, the People's Hall, was said to have been set ablaze and firefighters were trying to put out the flames.

    'Shot in the head'

    On Sunday evening, witnesses spoke of tear gas and live ammunition being used against protesters by the security forces.

    A man who attended a rally in Tripoli's central Green Square said snipers on rooftops had fired indiscriminately into the crowd using what sounded like machine guns.

    "People were shot in the head and in the back. I've now taken refuge in my home. I'm afraid to leave. There is a climate of fear," he told the BBC.

    Other reports say gunmen in vehicles with photos of Col Gaddafi sped through the streets, opening fire and running people over.


    This was one of the strangest political speeches I have ever watched or listened to.

    Saif al-Islam Gaddafi blamed everyone from foreigners, exiles, drug addicts, Islamists and the media for the crisis.

    He offered almost unlimited concessions - but warned of civil war if the trouble continued.

    Then came the threat: His father Col Gaddafi would fight till the last man, the last woman, the last bullet.

    The Libyan leader's son seemed completely to have missed the gravity of the crisis. It will surely only redouble the determination of Libyans to get rid of the regime. They know they face fearful retribution should Col Gaddafi somehow hang on to power.

    In the hours before Saif Gaddafi's speech was broadcast, crowds in Tripoli could be heard chanting slogans calling for the toppling of the regime.

    Earlier reports said Col Gaddafi had fled Libya, prompting crowds to come out on to the streets of Tripoli to celebrate, but his son told state TV viewers that his father remained in Libya "leading the battle".

    Security forces fired tear gas and live ammunition in the Gourghi area of the city, according to witnesses, but there were no immediate reports of casualties.

    Hundreds of Libyans, some armed with knives and guns, attacked a South Korean-run construction site west of Tripoli, an unnamed official at South Korea's foreign ministry told Reuters news agency.

    It sparked a clash in which at least 15 Bangladeshi and three South Korean employees of the site were hurt - two of the Bangladeshis with serious stab wounds.

    South Korean companies have worked on hundreds of construction projects in Libya in recent decades.

    Benghazi, the country's second city, appears to be largely under the control of protesters after four days of unrest. Unconfirmed reports say an army general there has defected to the opposition.

    Hospitals in the city are said to be struggling to cope with casualties, with one doctor saying he had received 50 bodies on Sunday afternoon alone.

    Fresh demonstrations have been reported in cities including Tobruk, al-Bayda and Misrata.

    In another blow to Col Gaddafi's rule, representatives of the Warfla tribe, Libya's biggest, have endorsed the protests.

    The leader of the eastern al-Zuwayya tribe threatened to cut oil exports unless authorities halted what he called the "oppression of protesters", Reuters reported.

    Libya's envoy to the Arab League, Abdel Moneim al-Honi, announced he was "joining the revolution" and its ambassador to India, Ali al-Essawi, told the BBC he was resigning in protest at his government's violent crackdown on demonstrators.

    'Drunkards and thugs'

    In his rambling TV address - the first comment on the unrest by a senior figure from the Libyan leadership - Saif Gaddafi poured scorn on protesters, talking of "drunkards and thugs" driving tanks about the streets of Benghazi.




    "Libya is not Tunisia or Egypt," he declared.

    In his speech, Saif Gaddafi criticised the foreign media for what he termed their exaggeration of the extent of the violence in Libya.

    He said opposition groups and outsiders were trying to transform Libya into a group of small states. If they succeeded, he said, foreign investment would stop and living standards would drop drastically.

    Troops had opened fire on protesters because they were not trained to handle civil unrest, he argued.

    But he warned that if a civil war started, Libyans would be "mourning hundreds and thousands of casualties", and Libya would slide back to "colonial" rule.

    On Sunday, the US issued its strongest condemnation yet of the use of force in Libya, calling on Tripoli to allow peaceful protests after "credible reports" of hundreds of casualties.

    "We have raised to a number of Libyan officials, including Libyan Foreign Minister Musa Kusa, our strong objections to the use of lethal force against peaceful demonstrators," said state department spokesman Philip Crowley.

    European Union foreign ministers were set to condemn the repression of protesters in Libya, according to the draft of a joint statement to be agreed at their meeting later on Monday.

    Spanish Foreign Minister Trinidad Jimenez said the EU was considering pulling its citizens out of Libya - along with oil company BP, which reportedly said it was preparing plans to evacuate its own staff.

    UK Foreign Secretary William Hague earlier told the Libyan leader's son in a phone call of London's "grave concern" at the escalation of violence.

    Col Gaddafi is the Arab world's longest-serving leader, having ruled the oil-rich desert state since a coup in 1969.

    The Middle East region is seeing a wave of pro-democracy protest, fuelled by the fall of Egypt's Hosni Mubarak on 11 February, and long-time Tunisian President Zine al-Abidine Ben Ali in January.


    http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-middle-east-12520586
     
  13. Blackwater

    Blackwater Veteran Member Veteran Member

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    Col Gaddafi under mounting pressure




    Col Muammar Gaddafi's regime is under pressure amid unprecedented protests in the Libyan capital and defections by senior diplomats.

    Protesters out on the streets of Tripoli late on Sunday were met by security forces using live ammunition and tear gas.

    Benghazi, the country's second city, now appears to be largely under the control of protesters.

    But Col Gaddafi's son, Saif al-Islam, has warned that civil war could ignite.

    In a lengthy TV address, he offered significant political reforms but also vowed that the regime would "fight to the last bullet" against "seditious elements".

    'Massacre'

    On Monday, reports from Tripoli suggested the streets were mainly quiet, with government forces still patrolling Green Square after crushing protests in what witnesses called a "massacre".

    A central government building, the People's Hall, was said to have been set ablaze and firefighters were trying to put out the flames.

    Libya's envoy to the Arab League, Abdel Moneim al-Honi, announced he was "joining the revolution" and its ambassador to India, Ali al-Essawi, told the BBC he was resigning in protest against his government's violent crackdown on demonstrators.



    Mohamed Bayou, who until a month ago was chief spokesman for the Libyan government, said the leadership was wrong to threaten violence against its opponents.

    He made his comments in a statement obtained by the Reuters news agency which appeared to indicate disagreement within the ruling elite.

    In another blow to Col Gaddafi's rule, two tribes - including Libya's largest tribe, the Warfla - have backed the protesters.

    Human Rights Watch says at least 233 people have died since last Thursday, though in his speech, Saif Gaddafi insisted reports of the death toll had been exaggerated.

    The US, UK and French governments are among those which have condemned the harsh treatment of protesters.



    http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-middle-east-12523669
     
  14. sandeepdg

    sandeepdg Senior Member Senior Member

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    Libya in turmoil, thousands seek repatriation

    TRIPOLI: Libya's Muammar Gaddafi will fight a popular revolt to "the last man standing", one of his sons said on Monday after protests broke out in the capital for the first time following days of unrest in the city of Benghazi.

    Anti-government protesters rallied in Tripoli's streets, tribal leaders spoke out against Gaddafi, and army units defected to the opposition as oil exporter Libya endured one of the bloodiest revolts to convulse the Arab world.

    Gaddafi's son Saif al-Islam Gaddafi appeared on national television in an attempt both to threaten and calm people, saying the army would enforce security at any price.

    "Our spirits are high and the leader Muammar Gaddafi is leading the battle in Tripoli, and we are behind him as is the Libyan army," he said. "We will keep fighting until the last man standing, even to the last woman standing ... We will not leave Libya to the Italians or the Turks."

    Wagging a finger at the camera, he blamed Libyan exiles for fomenting the violence. But he also promised dialogue on reforms and wage rises.

    A Tripoli resident, who did not want to be identified, said the streets of the capital were calm early on Monday morning but that there was no sign of police, which is unusual for the city.


    He said that late on Sunday night anti-Gaddafi protesters had been replaced by his supporters, who rallied in the centre of the city around Green Square until about 5 am (0400 GMT).

    "After Saif al-Islam's speech, the pro-Gaddafi people, especially the youth, were touring the streets, particularly in the centre, cheering Gaddafi. These people stayed up the whole night, they were marching all night, some driving in cars.

    "They were in Green Square and along Omar al-Mokthar street. I would say there were hundreds," he said.

    "I talked to someone near the square where the clashes were taking place and he told me it was quiet and they (anti-government demonstrators) have now departed.

    "Last night during the rioting there were police around and they were shooting into the air. But after that there have been no police around," added the Tripoli resident.

    Saif al-Islam's cajoling may not be enough to douse the anger unleashed after four decades of rule by Gaddafi — mirroring events in Egypt where a popular revolt overthrew the seemingly impregnable President Hosni Mubarak 10 days ago.

    "People here in Benghazi are laughing at what he is saying. It is the same old story (on promised reform) and nobody believes what he says," a lawyer in Libya's second city told the BBC after watching the speech.

    "He is liar, liar, 42 years we have heard these lies." The international community must do everything it can do prevent Libya sinking into civil war, French government spokesman Francois Baroin said on Monday.

    "We're extremely worried and shocked and we strongly condemn what's happening, this unprecedented violence, which could descend into an extremely violent and lengthy civil war," Baroin said in an interview on Europe 1 radio.

    "The repression has begun and everything must be done at diplomatic level to coordinate the American and European positions to prevent something drastic happening."

    The United States said it was weighing "all appropriate actions" in response to the unrest.

    "We are analysing the speech ... to see what possibilities it contains for meaningful reform," a US official said.

    The Turkish Foreign Ministry said that around 3,000 Turkish citizens had applied to be repatriated from Libya since Friday and the first plane was sent to Benghazi on Sunday morning, with more planes to be sent once permission was granted.

    But CNN Turk reported that one Turkish Airlines plane had returned without landing amid reports that the airport had been taken over by opposition protesters. It was unclear if this plane was the same as the one mentioned by the foreign ministry.

    In Benghazi, protesters appeared to be largely in control after forcing troops and police to retreat to a compound. Government buildings were set ablaze and ransacked.

    "Security now, it is by the people," the lawyer said. In the first sign of serious unrest in the capital, thousands of protesters clashed with Gaddafi supporters. Gunfire rang out in the night and police used tear gas to disperse demonstrators, some of whom threw stones at Gaddafi billboards.

    South Korea said hundreds of Libyans, some armed with knives and guns, attacked a South Korean-run construction site in Tripoli, injuring at least 4 foreign workers.

    Human Rights Watch said at least 223 people have been killed in five days of violence. Most were in Benghazi, cradle of the uprising and a region where Gaddafi's grip has always been weaker than elsewhere in the oil-rich desert nation.

    Habib al-Obaidi, a surgeon at the Al-Jalae hospital, said the bodies of 50 people, most of them shot, were brought there on Sunday afternoon. Two hundred wounded had arrived, he said.

    Members of an army unit known as the "Thunderbolt" squad had brought wounded comrades to the hospital, he said. The soldiers said they had defected to the cause of the protesters and had fought and defeated Gaddafi's elite guards.

    The Libyan uprising is one of series of revolts that have raced like wildfire across the Arab world since December, toppling the long-time rulers of Tunisia and Egypt and threatening entrenched dynasties from Bahrain to Yemen. The West has watched with alarm as long-time allies and old foes have come under threat, appealing for reform and urging restraint.

    Support for Gaddafi, the son of a herdsman who seized power in 1969, among Libya's desert tribes was also waning. The leader of the Al-Zuwayya tribe in the east threatened to cut oil exports unless authorities halted "oppression of protesters".

    Libya is Africa's fourth biggest oil exporter, producing 1.6 million barrels of oil a day.

    Oil jumped by more than $1 a barrel to $103.5 a barrel on fears the unrest could disrupt supplies.

    http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/...nds-seek-repatriation/articleshow/7539422.cms
     
  15. sandeepdg

    sandeepdg Senior Member Senior Member

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    Libya's ambassador to India resigns in protest against violence: BBC

    Libya's ambassador to India has resigned in protest at his government's violent crackdown on demonstrators calling for the ouster of Libyan leader Muammar Gadhafi, the British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC) reported on Monday. (Read: Gadhafi's son warns of civil war in Libya )

    The BBC, on its Arabic service website, said Ambassador Ali al-Essawi also accused the government of deploying foreign mercenaries against the protesters. The BBC confirmed to Reuters it had spoken to Essawi.

    There was no immediate comment from the Libyan embassy in New Delhi.

    http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/...-against-violence-BBC/articleshow/7538308.cms
     
  16. sandeepdg

    sandeepdg Senior Member Senior Member

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    I read in yesterday's TOI in an article on Libya that the Libyan forces loyal to Gaddafi had fire on protesters using Anti aircraft missiles ! Holy cow !! What kind of people will fire missiles at unarmed protesters !
     
  17. prahladh

    prahladh Respected Member

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    Gadaffi is not Mubarak. He ain't going down easy. What are the world leaders doing ? I mean 300 dead & 900 injured.
     
  18. Blackwater

    Blackwater Veteran Member Veteran Member

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    Wait and Watch. who are world leaders,, Amereeeican and allies. They are enjoying the show man.
     
  19. vijaytripoli

    vijaytripoli Regular Member

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    My Father went to tripoli, Libya just two days back. We could n .t talked much about situation there on phone ( because of security reasons) but he was saying that the situation isn,t so bad as been reported by media. Could n,t got the much details though but will try through mail....///

    Chau
     
  20. S.A.T.A

    S.A.T.A Senior Member Senior Member

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    May be to your last bullet,but not to the last man and woman in Libya.rest assured Libyans are determined to fight to the last of the Gadaffi's
     
  21. Yusuf

    Yusuf GUARDIAN Administrator

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    The difference between Egyptian and Libyan uprising is the armed forces. The Egyptian army from day one was neutral, even siding the protesters. In libya, all the forces are not with the protesters. I think some in the east of the country are with them. If the army backs off, Gadhhafi will be history.
     

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